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Silver War Badge


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Hello all,

I picked this SWB up the other day at about half the going rate. I believe it to be a silver dipped original but don't have anything to compare it with, nor do I have my Researchers & Collectors Guide to the Great War.

It would be great if anyone can back up my opinion or even comment as to why it isn't good.

Thanks

Tony

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Hello all,

I picked this SWB up the other day at about half the going rate. I believe it to be a silver dipped original but don't have anything to compare it with, nor do I have my Researchers & Collectors Guide to the Great War.

It would be great if anyone can back up my opinion or even comment as to why it isn't good.

Thanks

Tony

Tony the badge itself looks OK but I think the pin is areplacement as they are usually silver not goldy colour.

Paul

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Hello all,

I picked this SWB up the other day at about half the going rate. I believe it to be a silver dipped original but don't have anything to compare it with, nor do I have my Researchers & Collectors Guide to the Great War.

It would be great if anyone can back up my opinion or even comment as to why it isn't good.

Thanks

Tony

Hello, Silver is a metal that d?nt get rust but sulphate. If you d'ont clean it in one week, more or less, it have to change colour from silver to something like gold durty colour. And silver always have a mark

that colud be 925 MM or 8oo, depending. Or a five tip star.

To clean you can use water and soap or a special product as tarni-shield. Silver is a very soft metal too and wear out very quick with use.

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Paul & Boris, thanks for your comments.

I'm not worried about a replaced pin and will now try to find the name of the soldier behind the number.

Boris, I don't think I've ever seen an assay mark on a SWB in the past.

Thanks again.

Tony

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Sorry, all I know are the SWBs struck at and awarded from the Calcutta Mint and I suspect these are different enought that my comments are irrelevant. Sorry.

Any comments are good to hear Ed.

Do you know if the Calcutta Mint struck them for other Empire/Commonwealth countries? I would imagine the number was punched shortly before issue.

Tony

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Boris, I don't think I've ever seen an assay mark on a SWB in the past

Tony

Hello, I`m not an expert in this badge, marks are obligatory nowadays, I'll investigate about this point, is interesting. Must be a low % silver proportion badge. I think SWB is not a good piece to make fakes because have too hand-made work with soldiering and silver is a low price precious-metal. Its not to be worth because its low price, i've seen one in e-bay for 14 euros. Too cheap for fakes. I'm sure yours is original, other cuestion is the pin or neddle, wherw nowadays you can find many times the essay marks.

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I think you can still pick up the British Army badges for a reasonable price, it'll be those with the prefix RAF, RN, A, C, I, NZ that'll cost a little more. I suppose there are some with SA too.

Tony

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  • 2 weeks later...

Is that an A prefix?

There are NF ones too, I think, for Newfoundland.

Yes it is, I've already asked a researcher if he can find the recipient for me. If his entry sheet survives I should also receive his service record.

Tony

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Thanks Gilbert, it's A 59444.

I'm hoping for a positive result on the research early next week.

Don't have a Canadian SWB, only RN, British army and this Australian one. I did see one to NZ a while back but thought the asking price was too much.

Tony

Edited by Tony
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Hi Tony,

Here's the SWBs I have in my collection. I've photographed them with the first type called the Army Overseas Service Class "A" badge issued to the CEF. The other badges are referred to as the Army Overseas Service Class "B" badge.

The Class "A" badges were clearly marked CEF and For Service at the Front.

The Class "B" badges were for service in the United Kingdom or for service at the front.

There is a Class "C", which I thought I had in my collection but now see I don't, was for those who did not qualify for either of the two previously mentioned awards.

The one pictured to the right is like yours and the one to the left appears to be made of a higher silver content going by the patina. The numbering is a different size and the pins run differently on the two badges, this can be seen better in the second photo.

I was not aware there were any lists available that could reveal who was issued with a particular badge. I know there are partial lists for the Royal Canadian Air Force Reserve pins but they are in no particular order, or so I have been informed.

:cheers: Cheers

Brian

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Thanks for the pics Brian, I didn't know the A badge was a type of SWB but have seen one before somewhere.

As for the records of recipients, I think it depends on which country the badge was issued by. The Australian records appear to be the easiest to turn up a name if the record has survived, the British ones are there but apparently finding the name isn't straight forward.

Tony

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Hi Tony,

I wanted to post the reverse of the pins I posted earlier but the internet kept going down here. It had been kicking me out so-to-speak every 10 to 20 minutes. I hope today it is in a better mood. :unsure:

The pin to the right is a Canadian issue with the prefix "C". The pin was replaced by me and I made it from stainless steel. It looks a little too long for the badge but I took the measurements and shape directly from a Canadian badge that I borrowed from a fellow collector.

The one on the left has no prefix and I was told it was a British issue. Is this likely or just a dealer's pitch to get me to purchase? I noticed that this badge has a ring on the top on the back just above the crown. It would look as though this was meant to allow the badge to be worn in a broach-style or worn from a chain in a pendant fashion. Is this a common practice in the manufacture of the British issue? Could this have been a style issued to female recipients allowing them a choice of wearing styles? I understand these were worn on civilian clothing and not of the service uniform so the regulations as to proper wear would probably be more relaxed.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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