Jump to content
Gunjinantiques

Show Your Japanese Medal Hallmarks & Maker's Marks

Recommended Posts

So it seems clear that the "M" is an Osaka Mint mark. But what might be the significance of the other marks? Are these possibly similar to the way Japanese weapons have been marked where characters denote a specific series for a serial# range, arsenal, or an actual person's personal inspection mark? Were there other mint locations operating under supervision by the Osaka mint?

Edited by Dieter3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So it seems clear that the "M" is an Osaka Mint mark. But what might be the significance of the other marks? Are these possibly similar to the way Japanese weapons have been marked where characters denote a specific series for a serial# range, arsenal, or an actual person's personal inspection mark? Were there other mint locations operating under supervision by the Osaka mint?

The short answer is that nobody knows. This requires a level of original research which is almost akin to what is done with ancient coins in trying to identify mint issues etc. I have not been able to find any information on this in the public domain in Japan so I suspect the information may be lost to time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anybody ever tried contacting the current mint? I know a lot of records were destroyed during the war years, but I wonder if connections remain to people that may have worked there (if anybody is still living!)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There always has to be "something" left; it couldn't have all been destroyed. Records would have been duplicated to some point and some records probably exist somewhere. The problem is (only my opinion and don't mean sh1t), this is virtually a non-priority for anyone in government that might have access to records and then, where do you start?

Who cares about something that is half a centrury old already and of a time that most current population could honestly care less about or want to forget. One day, some old guy cleaning out some storage shelf in some old government building will come across some old archive documents and by chance someone else that collects, or knows someone who does, will "discover" the ultimate source of information. Until then, unless someone with a buddy that could authorize access and have a lot of time on their hands to really DIG for this information, it will not happen.

Again, only expressing my view. Government is government, doesn't matter what country we're talking about.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who cares about something that is half a centrury old already and of a time that most current population could honestly care less about or want to forget. One day, some old guy cleaning out some storage shelf in some old government building will come across some old archive documents and by chance someone else that collects, or knows someone who does, will "discover" the ultimate source of information.

And if it does exist, you can only hope that the one involved don't discard it as old garbage..... :speechless1: Wouldn't it be nice to know people in power? Need an inside person!! I think you're right, information is likely to exist somewhere, either on paper, or in the back of some person's mind.

I do know information like this can be difficult to obtain with regards to weapons/small arms, but many of the books do cite human connections that have garnered information - people that knew, were there, or otherwise had something to do with manufacturing, at least in the days leading up to WWII....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dieter,

Well, considering we see so many near pristine Japanese awards and documents for sale all the time is a testament that some things did in fact survive the war and in decent shape. I know when I was stationed in Yokosuka back in the 1990's, I would talk to communication types that worked up "on the hill" that said all kinds of stuff WWII related was still being found in various underground tunnels in and around the area. I know they were doing a lot of underground construction at the time I ws getting short, so who knows how many of these underground facilities there were spread throughout the country?

Has to be something, maybe nothing more than a booklet or a notice sent from the mint to one of the distributors with a list of names and authorized marks similar to what the Germans did with LDO numbers. You would think anyway.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another 1914-15 War Medal, looks like this mark is pretty common....??

IMG_6557.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got one of these with the "M" as well - wonder if they were all marked in this way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A men's Red Cross Life Member medal with the very common "井" hallmark, but nonetheless a nicely stamped one (kinda cool inside the circle) with the matched hallmark on the lapel rosette:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A men's Red Cross Life Member medal with the very common "井" hallmark, but nonetheless a nicely stamped one (kinda cool inside the circle) with the matched hallmark on the lapel rosette:

NICE ONE! Never seen that one before! Thanks for posting, now I gotta go check my rosettes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a special member's medal/rosette, both with the matching "井" kanji. Others that I have seen, though I do not have myself, are the "ス" hallmarks on both medals and rosettes - so I'm guessing there's a likelihood that these would typically be matched too. It makes sense a medal and rosette would have matching hallmarks. But then again, maybe just coincidence? All part of the mystery that makes the collecting that much more enjoyable! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...