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Original Great East Asia War Medal


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No! That's not true!

Check the symbol below your post "American Numismatic Society ..." and you'll see "something different" ;)

Aha!

After all my multi-language typing ...

After all these songs and dances ...

You gave me " ;) " hidden inside the quote of my own post! :lol:

P.S. Don't worry. It isn't over yet .... I'll return soon with more posts about original GEAWM and its ribbon

657c1a9f7aa711e754e343900b08ea11.gif

Keep your " ;) " in full readiness! :whistle:

Edited by JapanX
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Aha!

You gave me " ;) " hidden inside the quote of my own post! :lol:

Don't worry - just like to show you, that I'm hanging on your every word - :rock on:

I love reading your posts and even more, seeing your photos!!!

I wish, I could pay back somehow... :anmatcat:

Too bad, that the current owner of this Numismatic Society medal didn't show up here yet... :whistle::D

Chris

Edited by Gensui
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I wish, I could pay back somehow...

Don't worry - we'll think something out 331734f709fd9ed3057dd63f366f0ea5.gif

Too bad, that the current owner of this Numismatic Society medal didn't show up here yet... :whistle::D

:anmatcat:

Edited by JapanX
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So where we were?

Aha!

Medal from collection of American Numismatic Society…

Yes.

The one that was sold on April 26, 2007 (somewhere between 10.00 am and 2.00 pm) in London (Morton & Eden of course).

Sold for 1150 pounds (without commission).

But why ANS did such a terrible thing…

Sold its “precious”?

Because “…despite this "avalanche" of new artifacts, both public and institutional interest was increasingly limited. From the 1970s on, the orders and decorations, especially the non-American portions of the collection, were exhibited less frequently. While the fine collection of American medals and badges were still occasional subjects for study, researchers largely ignored the European and Asian orders and decorations. The Decorations, Insignia and War Medals committee became inactive and by the late 1990s, was officially discontinued. Consequently, the Society ultimately made the difficult decision to de-accession the non-American portions of the collection and to make them available for the benefit of other museums, collectors and scholars”.

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So currently there are three different pieces with "authentic" ribbon known (excluding the one from Peterson)?

While the remaining pieces of 9,997 medals (according to Morton & Eden info) are "somewhere" - what do we know about the (quantity) of the ribbon? Were the medals stored at the Osaka mint together with the ribbon? Adjusted?...

An intersting topic with a lot of questionmark...

BR, Chris

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