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Anyone read Japanese?


Claudius
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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

That tag belonged to Hans Eggebrecht, born in Steglitz

He was working at Illies & Co. in Kobe, Japan as sales staff when the war broke out and he volunteered in August of 1914

as a Seesoldat in the 6th Company of the 3rd Marines Battallion. He became a POW of the Japanese in Nov 1914, first in

the POW camp in Matsuyama, where he was prisoner 2835. He was then moved to the Bando POW camp on April 9th,1917

He was released in December 1919. He obviously spoke Japanese as he was one of the 4 German interpreters during his

stay in Matsuyama. Your tag is from his days in Bando

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That tag belonged to Hans Eggebrecht, born in Steglitz

He was working at Illies & Co. in Kobe, Japan as sales staff when the war broke out and he volunteered in August of 1914

as a Seesoldat in the 6th Company of the 3rd Marines Battallion. He became a POW of the Japanese in Nov 1914, first in

the POW camp in Matsuyama, where he was prisoner 2835. He was then moved to the Bando POW camp on April 9th,1917

He was released in December 1919. He obviously spoke Japanese as he was one of the 4 German interpreters during his

stay in Matsuyama. Your tag is from his days in Bando

Hello Nick;

This is a great Christmas present! :jumping: My sincere thank you! This tag was among other personal effects I recently purchased. Originally, they were attributed to belong to one person, but now I can see that they belong to at least two Tsingtau individuals. I will post the items as soon as I can organize and photograph them.

Thank you for reading the name for me. I was not having any success. I really like being able to know the name on the tag. How did you know that he was one of only four German interpreters at Matsuyama? You must have a great source for WWI German POWs in Japan.

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Yes, I've had a head start on the subject of WW1 German POWs in Japan while writing an article for the Wehrmacht Awards Forum. Sorry, but I don't know how to insert links here. There in the Japan Forum, the article is titled "Beethoven’s Symphony Number 9, Odes to Joy in Captivity ".

Basically all the POWs can be looked up. A great number of them remained in Japan after their release and quite a few famous Japanese brands today owe their existence to the Germans, who became members of Japanese society, Bridgestone Tires being an example. Anyway, it is a fascinating area of study for me, which is why I made an exception and posted on this forum for the first time.

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I had thought his name was on the rear side of the Bando tag you showed first, but now I understand it was not. The latest photo shows he was prisoner 32, and as that was not his number in Matsuyama, we can assume it was his number at Bando. So what was the item in the first photo with the branded Bando Camp name?

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Sorry Nick;

There are TWO wood blocks; one larger, one smaller.

I did not possess the items when I posted the larger, engraved wood block in Post #1 and #3.

I have it now and I was able to flip it over.

The wood block in Post #1 and #3 is the larger. The engraving in the obverse is "Bando Prisoner of War Camp" -Thank you Jktu.

I will post photos of the reverse of the larger wood block when I can, but it is a;

simple engraved "S" inside a square,

and a "4"

and then a "113".

The wood block in Post #6 and #12 is the smaller wood block.

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Here is reverse side of the Large Wooden block.

The patch was with the Lot of items to this gentleman (or gentlemen as there may be more than one person's belongings here). As you can see, the patch as the identical "4" and "113" numbering.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I finally found the film about the Bando POW camp on the net. They must have used a translation program for the English subtitle, as it is full of horrible mistakes, but if you understand German, half the movie is in German anyway. The set used for the movie is a pretty faithful recreation of the real thing and the daily life of the POWs is well portrayed. In the film, the historical concert takes place with the participation of the local residents as audience, but the real event was only for the inmates. The 4 on the wooden tag must be the barracks number. Here is the link to the movie..

http://www.veoh.com/watch/v19512431wEnaEjn8

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I finally found the film about the Bando POW camp on the net. They must have used a translation program for the English subtitle, as it is full of horrible mistakes, but if you understand German, half the movie is in German anyway. The set used for the movie is a pretty faithful recreation of the real thing and the daily life of the POWs is well portrayed. In the film, the historical concert takes place with the participation of the local residents as audience, but the real event was only for the inmates. The 4 on the wooden tag must be the barracks number. Here is the link to the movie..

http://www.veoh.com/watch/v19512431wEnaEjn8

Excellent. Thank you for the link.

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