Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Guys,

This came out of the same container as the photo album. I am unsure what it is supposed to be as it states log book but is more informal like a diary? It has a lot of interesting bits in it. I will post some of the more interesting bits. I can't read his hand so if anyone can feel free. I can make out he was on board the Line Ship Schlesien in what capacity I am unsure, perhaps a cadet or such like hence the diary/log? I am sure it would be worth decyphering his entries as he has put a lot of effort into it. I like the U1 picture, I have seen the image on the net so no doubt a commercial image you could buy at the souvaneer stands, it is embossed at the lower right with a firm name from Keil.

Any ideas as to why he has this book going on?

Jock :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Jock.

Thank you for posting this.Interesting Log Book of and then for Matrose ( sailor) Luetjens.who apparently started his navy enlistment on bord of the old battleship of the line (Linienschiff) "Schlesien". His handwriting is easy to read only the size gives me some trouble. He gives the particulars of the ship which they learned to become familiar with it including the officers complement and their assignment ( First Officer, Engineering Officer etc). The ships armament, speed.and all things important.

So this is a personal log rather than anything official. He gives info on a trip to Spain while it seemingly is still a republic. The picture of U 1 shows the ship's flag still to be the Weimar flag not the new "Reichskriegsflagge" with the swastica.

The last page you show describes the new year 1936 just being entered.

The "Schlesien" was a training vessel and obsolete but still useful together with the "Schleswig Holstein" and both performed credibly during the between war years having been allowed by the Versailles Treaty to be kept by Germany and then during the WW II.

I wish I could read more of the pages but that is a pain...

Bernhard H. Holst

BTW: name Luetjens is a coincidence with the Admiral who died on the "Bismarck"

Edited by Bernhard H.Holst
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bernhard,

It is well filled out, perhaps if I scan it in if I get a spare couple of hours it may be an interesting read for some of the KM types. Thanks for your thoughts thus far. So it is a diary in end effect and not an official document, I thought not anyway but nice to know for sure. It was in the bin so I am glad I found it but it always bothers me that I haven't found everything on a big skip like todays. Such a shame people would bin historical items such as this.

Jock :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Jock.

Yes, a shame what has been and is still being discarded. But then who would want articles such as this except weird folks like us???

I will save above pages in my Documents and diddle to perhaps enlarge it in order to easier read them. What I was able to make out Matrose Luetjens was an eager and willing young fellow. There were a lot more of them. Bearing in mind that the U-Boats never had a lack of volunteers in the sailor ranks however officers had to be ordered more and more to fill slots, one can only wonder...

Bernhard H. Holst

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Blog Comments

    • As a theology student my professor, a much published former Naval chaplain, set us an essay, saying that if we could answer that successfully we would be guaranteed  a good degree "Which of the gospel writers was the biggest liar, discuss."   I got a good mark, but  don't want to be burned for heresy.   P
    • As my father used to say: "Tain't so much Pappy's a liar - he just remembers big."  
    • Brian: First, let me say that I always enjoy reading your blog and your "spot on" comments.  Another fine topic with such a broad expansion into so many different facets.  I had watched this a week or two ago and when reading your blog, it reminded me of this great quote.   There is a great video on the origins of "Who was Murphy in Murphy's Law"   Anyway, about mid way through this video, there is this great quote and I think it sums it up quite well to your statem
    • I've received word from the Curator that she has permission to re-open this summer.   We're already making plans for a November event at the Museum.   Michael
    • I recall I did the same on hot days at Old Fort York back in 1973-74 - wool uniforms, and at 90F they would let you take your backpack off.   Michael
×
×
  • Create New...