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Alfred Ernest SCHOLES 
Born in Derbyshire on the 31st December 1864.
Joined Metropolitan Police on the 27th February 1888 - Warrant number 73418
Having completed his training and being posted to D Division, he lodged in a property within Allsopp Mews, in the Marylebone district of London. With two other Constables. 
At some point possibly as early as the 8th September 1888, following the Anne CHAPMAN murder, SCHOLES was seconded to H Division, to assist in the hunt for Jack the Ripper. He certainly appears to have been on duty in H Division on the night of the 29th/30th September 1888 for the double event murders and states in his memoirs that " he was patroling his beat on Tabbard Street East on the furthest end of his beat on Mile End Road, it was a memorable night there had been a Lord Mayors show, whilst I was on duty Jack the Ripper committed two of his murders in the very street that I was."
http://www.gsburroughs.com/ripper-story/
6th January 1896 PC225D posted to D Division CID.
3rd August 1898 promoted to Sgt 3rd class D Division.
23rd June 1903 promoted to Sgt 2nd class D Division. 
21st January 1908 promoted to Sgt 1st class Y Division.
27th June 1910 promoted to Detective Insp Y Division. 
In 1911 Alfred and his then family of wife and three children were resident at 17, Mark Road, Noel Park, London.
Pensioned 14th  July 1913 as Detective Inspector Y Division and joins the Port Authority 
Police at the same rank.
Finally retires in 1924
In 1939 he and his wife lived at 55, Whitehall Road, in the Grays area of London. Alfred was then working as a Private Enquiries Agent.  
It is believed that he died in the Battersea area of London in 1946. 
Entitled to 1897 Jubilee Medal as PC D Division, 1902 as PS D Division.

PC Scholes was just six months into his career with Scotland Yard when he, along with hundreds of other officers, were drafted into the dangerous and dark slums of Whitechapel to hunt for the killer that had been dubbed ‘Jack the Ripper.’ In his memoirs he recalls numerous occasions that he stopped and questioned innocent pedestrians, and led to comparative safety the many ‘fallen’ women who ran into his arms convinced that they had met ‘Jack’ and were next to be slaughtered. It is hard today to imagine the Whitechapel of 1888, with its narrow, unlighted streets, dirty alleys and slum buildings that housed some of London’s most unfortunate and desperate people. It was also a world of multiple races and nationalities all squeezed into a small, heavily populated district. It is also hard to imagine the terror that gripped the people of this poor part of London, and the terror and fear that swept the country as a whole. People genuinely feared for their lives and at the height of the scare, around September and October 1888, the streets of Whitechapel became deserted. 


Old Bailey pages
Famous cases from the book 

Housebreaking - 8th February 1897 as a Detective in G Division
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18970208-213&div=t18970208-213&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Robbery - 25th February 1901 as a Sergeant in D Division
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19010225-213&div=t19010225-213&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Robbery - 25th March 1901 as a Sergeant in D Division
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19020310-260&div=t19020310-260&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Libel - 10th March 1902 as a Sergeant in D Divison
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19020310-260&div=t19020310-260&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Forgery 3rd April 1905 as a Sergeant 
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19050403-301&div=t19050403-301&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Theft 11th September 1906 as a Sgt in D Division
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19060911-99&div=t19060911-99&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Fraud 21st October 1910 as a Sgt G Division
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19100208-35&div=t19100208-35&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Forgery 31st May 1910 as a Sgt
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19100531-21&div=t19100531-21&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Murder 28th March 1911 as an Insp
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19110328-46&div=t19110328-46&terms=Alfred Sholes#highlight
Theft 7th November 1911 as an Insp
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19111107-48&div=t19111107-48&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Theft 30th January 1912 as an Insp Y Division
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19120130-33&div=t19120130-33&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight
Fraud 4th February 1913 as an Insp
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19130204-32&div=t19130204-32&terms=Albert Scholes#highlight
Theft 4th March 1913 as an Insp
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19130304-65&div=t19130304-65&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight


http://www.gsburroughs.com/current-book/


 

Scholes portrait.jpg

Scholes 1897 Jubilee Medal.jpg

Forum 2.jpg

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  • 11 months later...
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Have been fortunate enough to be able to reunite SCHOLES’s 1902 Coronation Medal with his 1897 Jubilee Medal and his 1911 Coronation Medal and complete his full trio entitlement. 

F98B48EB-5EC4-462B-857C-73BBB4324870.jpeg

7F03CD30-1391-40FA-8D9F-8587D5CBB0C0.jpeg

241ED662-6F8F-4D71-8717-F694A3BA6818.jpeg

8C7E02F5-69AF-4024-B639-EF3E38F20125.jpeg

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Hi,

To re-unite any group of medals is great but to have managed to do this with '''Scholes's medals''' is fantastic and you now have one superb and stunning group of medals.    

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