Jump to content
laurentius

Luxembourg Military and Civil merit order

Recommended Posts

Dear fellow collectors

I recently came across this beautiful piece up for auction at auctionhouse Carsten Zeige from Hamburg. Although my collection-area is Germany in WW1 I also have an interest in WW2 awards and awards from different European states, since there was a lot of cross-awarding between states (germans like Max Becker, Ernst zu Lippe-Weißenfeld and Franz von Chauvin  received the award for example despite the fact that the order is not-german). When researching this cross I saw a lot of examples, but not a single one of them had their swords crossed in this bavarian style (MVO for example). Other pieces I saw had their swords crossed between the arms. At Emedals I found the same class with the swords crossed in the regular way. Could any of you give me some info on this piece, and on whether it is authentic? I will attach some examples.

Kind regards and thanks in advance, Laurentius

adolph.jpeg.b75c3924ae68aef60ab44b501b235ddc.jpeg

image.jpeg.a486764c3a0ccad172514f03d4ade09e.jpeg

image.jpeg.1d3ec54bc1c0094adf200af56b446f08.jpeg

Edited by laurentius

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's decidedly unusual to have crossed swords mounted this way!

There's no maker's mark that I can see (Carsten Zeige Auction 59, 2018-03-24, lot 339 if anyone's interested) but it could be a  foreign-made one commissioned by the recipient back home if, perhaps, he was German.

Or it could indicate a civil award at a higher level than a previously-awarded military award of the Order.

Some thoughts.

Megan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Megan

I would expect atleast a mark for the silver and the gold since the grandcross is made from silver-gilt and gold. Perhaps you are right about the foreign-made commisioned piece, seems like a viable option.

Kind regards, Laurentius

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Gentlemen,

Nowhere in the Luxembourg legal text concerning award, there is a mention of swords crossed above center of a breast star. In the german, romanian, & bulgarian system, it would indicates an award to a military in peace time. But no such things exist in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. 

Obviously the breast star is guenuine , but typical manufacture from Arthus Bertrand. 

We can assume that this breast star is a "freak" as Ernst Blass had had manufactured items that never existed, in the purpose to deceive collectors. 

I remember having seen this star at the time of the auction, better if no body has bought it.

Regards.

     Emmanuel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, heusy68 said:

Hello Gentlemen,

Nowhere in the Luxembourg legal text concerning award, there is a mention of swords crossed above center of a breast star. In the german, romanian, & bulgarian system, it would indicates an award to a military in peace time. But no such things exist in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. 

Obviously the breast star is guenuine , but typical manufacture from Arthus Bertrand. 

We can assume that this breast star is a "freak" as Ernst Blass had had manufactured items that never existed, in the purpose to deceive collectors. 

I remember having seen this star at the time of the auction, better if no body has bought it.

Regards.

     Emmanuel

Out of curiosity.... how would we be certain the star is genuine and not just a genuine breast star where someone added swords that were never there. If swords on top is not a "legal" version within this order my assumption would be added later to enhance value or to get credit for services not rendered or I could see that a jeweler/producer created the star that did not have the tools to make it and made it in a non confirmative fashion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's a typical early Arthus Bertrand breast star of Grand Officer, just the crossed swords above the center, doesn't exist.

So yes it was added later to try to "bait" a potential collector, who would have believe in the "fairy tale" that he was going to get a unique item.

People who lives far away from Europe, and far away from Belgium or Netherlands, or France where most of these Order have been awarded got rarely the occasion to get to see variation of insignia of Order Adolph Nassau, and believe me, there is, but mainly there is variation in low ranks. For the 2 higher grades of the Order, there is very very few variation. And crossed swords above the center of the 2nd Class breast star, it doesn't exist.

Even if one, can admit, that a manufacturer may have presented what would look like such an insignia, in case the Grand Duke of Luxembourg would have agreed to changes the legislation of the Order, and open provision "For Military Merit in Time of Peace"......but it never materialized in the facts.

As that breast star was for sale by Carsten Zeige, everybody should exerce caution.

Regards to all.

     Emmanuel

Edited by heusy68

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Thanks for your reply Patrick, just in case some might not know what the Belgian WW1 Medal you were referencing looks like I have included one here. I understand that the small crown on the ribbon denoted the recipient was a volunteer.  
    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
×
×
  • Create New...