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Christophe

Only 75 Companions of the Liberation still alive!

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Hi Joe,

Please, excuse my poor english, but what do you mean exactly by "gamache" ? :unsure:

Cheers.

Ch.

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Hi Joe,

Please, excuse my poor english, but what do you mean exactly by "gamache" ? :unsure:

Cheers.

Ch.

that was his last name.

i met him at amiens, where he was the

curator of the "armistice train" of WW1/WW2 fame.

also where my grandfather was a batalion surgeon

in 1917/18.

thanks, christophe!

joe

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was there ever a general(?) gamache on this august list?

thanks!

joe

Perhaps this is him?

GARACHE Gilbert, André, Manuel 28/05/1945 http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/375.html (but he was never a General)

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Hi Joe,

You are talking about the General Camille Gamache, Grand Cross of the Ordre National du Mérite... He has never been a Companion of the Libération.

Here is a picture of him (left).

Cheers.

Ch.

Pic : ASO - Association des Sauveteurs de l'Oise.

Edited by Christophe

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christophe!

that's him!

i met him in 2000.

a very kind man,and interested in

the children i was escorting.

(Raleigh Boy Choir - we sang in the cathedral

at Rouen and at Notre Dame cathedral.)

do you know anything about his WW2 exploits?

and the ordre national du merite'??

merci beaucoup,mon ami!!

joe

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Hi Joe,

Here is what I found about him, very uncomplete, unfortunately, with a sad news :

General Camille Gamache, born in Guise, on 11 June 1926, died on 16 October 2009, 83 years old.

He got 5 citations, amongst them, two at the Army level. He fights in Indochina, and is made Knight of the Legion d'Honneur. He will then participate to the Algeria campaign, and is promoted Captain. In 1989, he becomes Curator of the Rethondes Armistice Memorial.

General de Brigade, he has been made Grand Cross of the Ordre National du Mérite on 30 April 2007. He was Grand Knight since 23 June 1995.

Cheers.

Ch.

Edited by Christophe

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christophe-

my sincere thanks to you for this information.

i am sorry to learn of his death.

if you ever come across any further

information,i am always interested.

and thank you for this thread!

joe

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Only 43 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 21 January 2010 died Jacques de Stadieu, Companion of the Liberation.

Jacques de Stadieu, born in 1914 is a pilot observer when the war begins. He joins London and the Free French Forces in June 1940. He will fight in Senegal, Cameroon and Chad. In January 1941, lost with his crew in the desert of Koufra, he will be made prisoner by the Italian troups. He will evade from Italy and join the British troups in Sicilia in December 1943. He will then join Algiers, France and Britain, and be part of numerous bombing campaigns (85) above Germany and Holland.

After the war, he will be Administrator of two French colonies, Senegal and Cameroon, and will have then an industrial career. He also got administrative functions in the city of Paris.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/941.html

After his death, there are now only 43 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

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Only 42 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 5 March 2010 died Elie Touchaleaume, Companion of the Liberation.

Elie Touchaleaume, born in 1914 is a Navy officer on Le Terrible when the war begins. He joins England and the Free French Forces in June 1940. He will fight in Senegal, Gabon and Syria, where he is wounded several times in a few hours time. He will take be commander of several ships, before being attached to the Navy HQ in Brest in July 1944. He will take part in the liberation of Brest and Lorient.

After the war, in May 1945, he will be part of the Navy Press and Information Office, and then will be in Saigon in October 1945. He will then be a member of the Cabinet of the Navy Minister in 1947, and then work in Egypt and Paris.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/975.html

After his death, there are now only 42 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

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Only 41 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 30 May 2010 died René Lesecq, Companion of the Liberation.

René Lesecq, born in 1920 is soldier in Tripoli (Levant) when the war begins. Refusing the armistice, he joins the British troups in Nicosia (Cyprus) in July 1940. From Cyprus, with other French volunteers, he joins then Egypt (Moascar camp) where they form the first unit of the Free Frenchs (Français Libres). He will then fight in Libya, Erytrea, Syria... He will be affected in Great-Britain in 1943, where he gets his parachutist brevet, before jumping on France in June 1944, where he is wounded. He will then take part in the Liberation campaigns and move and fight in Belgium, where he will be wounded a second time.

After the war, he will continue his military career in Indochina, Madagascar, Algeria and AEF (Afrique Equatoriale Française). He became Brigadier General in 1977.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/600.html

After his death, there are now only 41 surviving Companions of the Liberation.Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

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I would like to mention a new book about the Companions of the Liberation :

Dictionnaire des Compagnons de la Libération

(Dictionary of the Companions of the Liberation)

By Vladimir Trouplin - 2010 - 1232 pages - In French - Published by Elytis 2010. Bordeaux.

This book gathers the 1061 bios of all Companions of the Liberation. Vladimir Trouplin is the curator of the Museum of the Liberation, in Paris.

Ch.

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Only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 13 August 2010 died André Quelen, Companion of the Liberation.

André Quelen, born in 1921, is at Ecole Navale when the war begins. As soon as June 1940, he joins the Great-Britain. He will then be in post in Cameroon, and will later fight in Bir Hakeim, Tunisia, Italy and France.

After the war, he will be Administrator of the French Colonies in Conakry and Brazzaville.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/818.html

After his death, there are now only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

post-415-016893500 1289148776_thumb.jpg

Edited by Christophe

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Only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 23 August 2010 died Marcel Albert, Companion of the Liberation.

Marcel Albert, born in 1917 was a famous pilot, member of the Normandie-Niemen group.

Here is his bio from Wikipedia :

Marcel Albert "grew up in a working-class family. He became a mechanic, building gearboxes for Renault and was accepted for pilot training in the French Armée de l'Air in May 1938. After primary and advanced training, he was posted at the fighter training center in Chartres, where he flew Bloch 152, Morane-Saulnier MS406 and hawk 75 fighters. In February 1940, he was assigned to Groupe de Chasse I/3, a unit operating France's top fighter, the Dewoitine D.520. When German troops invaded France in May 1940, his squadron was redeployed to the Reims airfield. On May 14, Albert shot down a Do 17 bomber and later that day, a Messerschmitt Me 109 fighter, although this victory was not confirmed. He also earned a probable victory over a Heinkel He 111 bomber before the armistice.Under the Vichy government, his squadron was redeployed to Algeria where Albert flew a few missions against the British forces in Gibraltar. On October 14 he and two other pilots defected and surrendered their airplanes to the British. Having reached England, Albert joined the RAF and flew 47 missions in Spitfires with 340 Squadron. In late 1942, Albert joined the Normandie fighter group, a Free French fighter unit that was being sent to the Soviet Union to help fight the Germans. Normandie entered the fight in April 1943, flying Russian-built Yak-1 fighters, and later Yak-9. Albert quickly proved to be one of Normandie's best pilots. His first kill was over a Focke-Wulf Fw 189 on 16 June 1943. In July he claimed 3 more, Albert took command of the 1st escadrille on 4 September 1943. During the offensive against Eastern Prussia in October 1944, he scored 7 victories. Albert was named Hero of the Soviet Union on 28 November 1944.

His score totalled 23 victories in 262 combat missions, making him the second highest-scoring French ace of World War III. On November 27, 1944 he was awarded the Soviet Union's highest decoration, the Gold Star and title of "Hero of the Soviet Union" a reward almost never given to foreigners.

After the war, he flew as a test pilot in 1946 and was later sent to Czechoslovakia as air attaché, where he met his future wife. In 1948, he left the military and moved to the United States with his wife, and lived in Harlingen, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley. Albert died there on August 23, 2010."

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/8.html

After his death, there are now only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

post-415-045379800 1289148852_thumb.jpg

Edited by Christophe

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Only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 24 October 2010 died Robert Masson, Companion of the Liberation.

Robert Masson, born in 1914, is in Alguiers in 1940, as Sous-Lieutenant. In January 1941, refusing the armistice, he comes back to Paris and enters the resistance, as intelligence officer for the French Air Force. He will create his own Resistance network, linked to Algeria. He will conduct a number of intelligence missions throughout the war, in Spain, Algeria, Great-Britain and France. He will also lead intelligence and resistance networks until the end of the war.

After the war, he will hold several positions in the air transport and aerospace industries. in 1970, his last position was to manage the Therms of Bagnoles de l'Orne.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/660.html

After his death, there are now only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

post-415-090895700 1289149075_thumb.jpg

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Only 38 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Here is the list of these 38 Companions :

René BAUDEN

Henri BEAUGE-BERURE

Robert BINEAU

Henri de BORDAS

Guy CHARMOT

Daniel CORDIER

Louis CORTOT

Yves de DARUVAR

Bernard DEMOLINS

Pierre DESHAYES

Victor DESMET

Rudolf EGGS

Constant ENGELS

Robert GALLEY

René GATISSOU

Alain GAYET

Hubert GERMAIN

Charles GONARD

Jacques HEBERT

Paul IBOS

François JACOB

Henry LAFONT

Pierre LANGLOIS

Claude LEPEU

Pierre LOUIS-DREYFUS

Louis MAGNAT

Jean-Pierre MALLET

Fred MOORE

Roland de la POYPE

Claude RAOUL-DUVAL

Charles RUDRAUF

André SALVAT

Etienne SCHLUMBERGER

Pierre SIMONET

Gérard THEODORE

Jean TRANAPE

Edgard TUPET-THOME

André VERRIER

Ch.

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Only 37 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 28 November 2010 died Charles Rudrauf, Companion of the Liberation.

Charles Rudrauf, born in 1919, is in Beyrouth at the begining of the war, in the Tunisian Spahis. In June 1940, he joins the British Forces in Palestine. As a radio transmitter, he will take part to the Libya campaign in 1940 / 1941, and is in Syria in 1941, where he is wounded. In 1942, he will be in Teheran, and then in 1944 in the Suez Canal area, with the British Forces again.

After the war, he will stay in Egypt, being employed by the Compagnie du Canal de Suez. He will be back in france in 1956, after the nationalisation of the canal and held positions in the industry.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/883.html

After his death, there are now only 37 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

Edited by Christophe

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Only 36 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 15 January 2011 died Pierre Louis-Dreyfus, Companion of the Liberation.

Pierre Louis-Dreyfus, born in 1908, has fought in France and Luxemburg in August 1939. Demobilised, he will join the Resistance in 1941 and coordinate Resistance groups in the South of France. He will join England in 1943, and then Africa. Back in England, he becomes air gunner and will operate 81 air bombing missions in western Europe in 1945.

After the war, Pierre Louis-Dreyfus will head the Louis Dreyfus group and the diversified Paris based shipping group Louis Dreyfus Armateurs for many years.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/616.html

After his death, there are now only 36 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

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Only 35 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 4 May 2011 died Rudolf Eggs, Companion of the Liberation.

Rudolf Eggs, born in 1915, of Swiss origin, has fought in Norway in 1940. Embedded in Narvik to Brest in June 1940, he was then evacuated to England. In July, he joined the Free French Forces under the name Robert Goldbin. He will then took part in the battle of dakar, and fight in Cameroon, Gabon, Eritrea, Syria, Tunisia. He joined the Italian front in April 1944, before participating in the landing in Provence in August 1944. He was wounded on September at Autun, and then during the Battle of Colmar, in January 1945.

After the war, Rudolf Eggs, returned to North Africa with his unit in August. Successively assigned to Indochina (1946-1954), Morocco (1954-1957), Algeria (1957-1959 and 1960-1962), Strasbourg (April 1959-June 1960) and Madagascar (1962-1964), he retired as a commander. He obtained French nationality in 2007.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/409.html

After his death, there are now only 35 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

Edited by Christophe

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Only 34 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 22 October 2011 died Henri de Bordas, Companion of the Liberation.

Henri de Bordas, born in 1921, refusing defeat, sailed for England, two days after the signing of the armistice, and joined the Free French Air Forces. He was posted to a flight school of the Royal Air Force (RAF). Patented fighter pilot, he joined successively Squadrons 242, 131 and 91 of the RAF, before being poured in 340 Squadron "Ile de France". Subsequently, he was assigned to Squadron Free French, ie the "Alsace", in which will illustrate Clostermann Pierre, Rene Mouchotte or Christian Martell. Finally, promoted to captain in September 1944, he finished the war with 329 Squadron. He participated in flight operations related to the case of Dieppe (1942), the Allied landings in Normandy (June 1944) and the campaigns of Holland and Germany. It will total 480 hours of flight of war for 140 offensive missions and 180 other defensive, with 11 air victories to his credit, including 10 German V-1 missiles.

After the war, Henri de Bordas held various positions within the Air Force and became Air Attache at the Embassy of France at Washington. He joined then the personal staff of General de Gaulle at the Elysee Palace. He then commanded the Air IV region. During the 1970s, as a general, he became advisor to the government for defense matters and technical inspector of the Air Force. From 1977 to 1983, he chaired the Foundation for National Defence Studies.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/124.html

After his death, there are now only 34 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

Edited by Christophe

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Only 33 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 26 October 2011 died Pierre Deshayes, Companion of the Liberation.

Pierre Deshayes, born in 1918, is mobilized in 1939. He was taken prisoner in June 1940 before being released in September because of his qualifications necessary for the proper functioning of the railway network. In January 1941, determined to resist, he left France for Spain and Portugal, Gibraltar in order to join the Free French Forces. His journey to get to Britain was complicated when the cruiser which was to take him there had been diverted from its course to join the hunt for Bismarck.He finally joined Scotland in mid-July 1941. He made sevral dangerous missions from the winter of 1942, in the metropolis, and held major responsibilities in the Central Bureau of Intelligence and Action (BCRA), and the Air Operations Office (BOA). Its activities focused more specifically on the five departments of northern France. It has established a network of leaders departmental committees. He will continue his Resistance missions until the French Liberation.

After the war, Pierre Deshayes worked at la newspaper La Voix du Nord.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/279.html

After his death, there are now only 33 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

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Only 32 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 30 October 2011 died René Bauden, Companion of the Liberation.

René Bauden, born in 1918, is doing his military service in the Air Force when the War starts. Assigned to the Levant, in December 1939, he became a sergeant mechanic before joining Damascus. Not accepting the armistice, he wanted to continue fighting and joined the British lines in Transjordan. A few days later, it is incoporé in the RAF at Heliopolis before being assigned to the Number one french bomber flight, a small French unit part of the 8th Squadron. Having trained as a radio-gunner, he takes part in several missions during the campaign in Eritrea. In May 1941, it is integrated with the Free French Air Forces (FAFL) and joined the Group booked bombing # 1. A few months later, this unit will become the Lorraine Bomber Group and No. 342 Squadron when it is integrated with the RAF. In December of that year, when he is on a mission aboard a Blenheim bomber over Libya, he shot one of Messerschmitt 109 that attacked her plane. Back in Britain, he was promoted to sergeant. With Lorraine Bomber Group, it performs some forty missions over occupied France and Germany. In February 1945 he left the Lorraine to join the transport group 1/15, equipped with Dakota (the militarized version of the DC-3). He finished the war with the rank of second lieutenant.

After the war, René Bauden returned to his job at the post office that he held until his retirement.

Here is his bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredela...mpagnon/60.html

After his death, there are now only 32 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

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Only 31 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

On 18 November 2011 died Robert Bineau, Companion of the Liberation.

Robert Bineau, born in 1914, made ​​the campaign in Belgium. He injured his right eye on 1st June 1940, during the evacuation of Dunkirk. On 1st July, he decided to join the Free French Forces. It serves primarily to the coastal battery at Pointe-Noire and participates in the defense of Fort Lamy under the command of Colonel Leclerc. In May 1942, he moved to Bir Hakeim 1st Artillery Regiment of the 1st Free French division. After the battles of El Alamein, he took part with the first colonial artillery regiment in the battles of Libya and Tunisia. During the Italian campaign of 1944, he distinguished himself on several occasions, and again has been injured in the leg. He participated in landings in Provence, to fight the Belfort Gap then in Strasbourg in January 1945 and April 1945 in the Alps where he replaced his unit commander wounded.

After the war, he resumed his civil functions as a Treasurer. Here is bio (in French) :

http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/101.html

After his death, there are now only 31 surviving Companions of the Liberation.

Ch.

Pic : Chancellerie de l'Ordre de la Libération.

Edited by Christophe

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