Dieter3

Florence Nightingale Medal

33 posts in this topic

Just recently visited the Japan Red Cross. There wasn't a lot to see, though they did have a small display that included the first Florence Nightingale medal and diploma to be awarded to a Japanese, and among those of the first group of this medal awarded in 1920. The recipient, Ms. Take Hagiwara, appears to be well-decorated judging by the photo on the description placard. I don't know enough about this medal but compared to another one on display and photos that I've seen, the ribbon is either an earlier style, or is of Japanese design. Anybody know???

post-6375-061888300 1288375106_thumb.jpg

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I'll let somebody else translate this if they really want to do so. No idea what some of the awards are, but appears like she at least has a Sacred Crown and a Japan Red Cross Order of Merit:

post-6375-088546900 1288375225_thumb.jpg

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ID: 3   Posted (edited)

Not in the greatest preservation conditions, in a glass case under a piece if plastic wrap, or so it appears, and fluorescent lightening, but here is the document with some edge wear and fade to the text:

post-6375-056806100 1288375481_thumb.jpg

Edited by Dieter3

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post-6375-071061200 1288375549_thumb.jpg

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Here is the other medal on display:

post-6375-095747500 1288375672_thumb.jpg

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Nice items, thanks for taking the time to share them. :jumping::jumping:

My wife is a Romanian Nurse and in 2008 I took her to visit the small

Florence Nightingale Museum in London, which she found very interesting.

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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My pleasure!!! biggrin.gif

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These are very rare. Sofar, I've seen 3 in 6 years or so of collecting:

- one in the war museum in Canberra Australia

- one at a dealer in Germany (awarded to a Yugoslav woman), 4-5k euro

- one was offered to me years ago, awarded to a mongolian, but i had no clue what the medal was for and ignored the offer (regret that for sure!)

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I wonder how many hours did you spend back there?

Did they called police just to get you out? :lol:

Nice photos by the way.

1920 type!!!

I believe it's Japanese style of course (they used ribbon from rising sun order) and what an unbelievable condition for the first type!!!

P.S.

- one was offered to me years ago, awarded to a mongolian, but i had no clue what the medal was for and ignored the offer (regret that for sure!)

Nice. Never heard about such mongolian group ... This one of course quasi rare...

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The ones I have seen were all mounted like the one in post #1 but on a ribbon like the one in post #5.

There was one on eBay recently. Engraved on the back. Looked original.

/Michael

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The ones I have seen were all mounted like the one in post #1 but on a ribbon like the one in post #5.

There was one on eBay recently. Engraved on the back. Looked original.

/Michael

Hi Michael

As I said the ribbon is from rising sun order. This is for sure.

About mounting style I am not so sure...

Cheers,

Nick

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The ones I have seen were all mounted like the one in post #1 but on a ribbon like the one in post #5.

There was one on eBay recently. Engraved on the back. Looked original.

/Michael

The one I saw at a dealer was also engraved on the reverse. The name was largely obscured unfortunately due to somebody trying to scratch it away.

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The one I saw at a dealer was also engraved on the reverse. The name was largely obscured unfortunately due to somebody trying to scratch it away.

That really is unfortunate! That calls for a serious flogging in my book! Wish I could have gotten a look at the reverse of that one I saw at the RC visitor's center. Maybe next time can convince them to take it out with my powers of persuasion and overwhelming charm.... :lol: ;)

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That really is unfortunate! That calls for a serious flogging in my book! Wish I could have gotten a look at the reverse of that one I saw at the RC visitor's center. Maybe next time can convince them to take it out with my powers of persuasion and overwhelming charm.... :lol:;)

Yep! Just do "your thing" on them :lol:

They will present you the whole collection just to get rid off you :lol:

P.S. Gents, I think that all medals were engraved. At least all russian recipients medals that I saw.

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ID: 15   Posted (edited)

Just to assure you Gents:

Article 4 (of Regulations for the Florence Nightingale Medal adopted by the Council of Delegates (Budapest 1991))

The Medal shall be in silver-gilt with a portrait on the obverse of Florence Nightingale with the words "Ad memoriam Florence Nightingale 1820-1910". On the reverse it shall bear the inscription on the circumference "Pro vera misericordia et cara humanitate perennis decor universalis". The name of the holder and the date of the award of the Medal shall be engraved in the centre.

The Medal shall be attached by a red and white ribbon to a laurel crown surrounding a red cross.

The Medal shall be accompanied by a diploma on parchment.

P.S. Only 1376 awarded from 1920 to 2011.

Edited by JapanX

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Nice article about Florence in PROSPECTS journal

http://www.ibe.unesco.org/fileadmin/user_upload/archive/publications/ThinkersPdf/nightingalee.PDF

Knock yourself out!

Cheers,

Nick

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ID: 17   Posted (edited)

A little add on.

Regarding the ribbon - it seems it has always been red and white with thin yellow stripe.

Regarding the mounting style - earlier medals has figured-style bows (form like in post 1) and modern medals has horizontal-style bow (form like in post 5)

Early ribbons was a little wider then modern ones.

I think that change from figure-style bow to horizontal-style bow took place in the last 20 years.

Early figured-style of the bow is here

http://en.valka.cz/files/rad_florence_nightingale.jpg

Later figured-style bow is here

For modern horizontal style bow - this short article with interesting photos

http://the100.ru/en/great-prizes/sisters-of-charity-florence-nightingale-medal.html

Cheers,

Nick

Edited by JapanX

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And another one.

Change in design of the bow most likely occurred in 1991 when the medal became medal "...for qualified male or female nurses and also for male or female voluntary nursing aides who are active members or regular helpers of a National Red Cross or Red Crescent Society or of an affiliated medical or nursing institution".

That's why we observe two types of the bow.

Early type was intended for lady's only, later style - it's a unisex style bow.

Regards,

Nick

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ID: 19   Posted (edited)

A little add on to our discussion of the Florence Nightingale Medal and its ribbon style.

Recently I came across two very interesting sources. Here they are

Anon. (Nov. 15, 1919) Florence Nightingale Medal. The British Medical Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3072, p. 645

Noyes, Clara (Sep., 1930) The Florence Nightingale Medal. The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 30, No. 9, pp. 1094+1149-1150.

Let’s study them.

Edited by JapanX

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ID: 21   Posted (edited)

1930 article (p. 1049)

Edited by JapanX

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ID: 24   Posted (edited)

Now we have another photo of the document for this rare medal + photo of the medal that was issued no later than in 1930 (at least!). On the photo we clearly see two additional thin stripes. But the color of these thin stripes looks like it is red! This is kinda strange... But then again this is black-and-white photo… Well, this thin one still looking like red to me ;)

My guess is that the medal we see on the page 1094 is the medal that was awarded to Miss Helen Scott Hay on May 12, 1920 (the document on p. 1094 dated 12 may 1920). I believe that both medals belong to the same very first vintage (in toto 42 medals were issued in 1920)!

Edited by JapanX

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ID: 25   Posted (edited)

Another strange thing – this sentence in the first article.

Edited by JapanX

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