bigjarofwasps

British Palestine Police?

11 posts in this topic

How did the British Palestine Police work between 1936 & 1948. Where they British Bobbies seconded to the roll from the UK or where they a force in their own right? 

Are there any books about them? 

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There appears to be loads of different ranks as well. Some suggest a military system?

ranks.png

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ID: 3   Posted (edited)

.............and if this isn't confusing enough. The medals to British Constables certainly is? How on earth did he end up in the Atlantic?  

646 British Constable K. Bourne, Palestine Police 

 

 

bpp medals 001.jpg

and yet this chap?

434 B/CONST. J.A. McMURTRIE. PAL. POLICE

Constable McMurtrie served with the Palestine Police as a British Constable during the Palestine Emergency between 1945-48.

He is confirmed on the Roll as qualifying for the medal and clasp, which was issued to him in 1950.

The Roll also states that his service in Theatre was from 19 April 1943 - To Date.

This service means he would also be entitled to a 1939-45 Star, Africa Star, Defence Medal and War Medal for his service in Palestine during WWII.

bpp medals 002.JPG

and then there's this example found on another thread on this forum...

"B/Constable Frank WINTER - He joined the Palestine Police c. 1940, his date of discharge is not known."

bpp medals 003.jpg

bpp medals 004.jpg

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Colonial Police Medal, George VI, 1st issue, for Gallantry (British Sgt. Dennis B. Richards, Palestine Police Force), India General Service Medal 1908 clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (Tpr., 15-19 H.); G.S.M, 2 clasps, Palestine, Palestine 1945-48 (1127 T/2/B/Sjt. Pal. Police). Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry was published London Gazette 30 December 1947. Dennis Baily Richards joined the Palestine Police on 15 May 1932, having previously served in the 15th/19th Hussars in India. He served in the Palestine Police until the stand down on 15 May 1948. Served as a Sergeant in the Mounted Section.

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1939-45 War Medal                                                          Unnamed 
General Service Medal Palestine 1945-48                 2739 B. CONST. G.D.C. EVANS. PAL.POLICE. 
1977 Queen’s Jubilee Medal                                         Unnamed
Police Long Service & Good Conduct Medal (QEII) CONST. GEORGE D.C. EVANS
Original documents, photos, copy service papers. 
George David Charles Evans was born in Blaenow, Monmouthshire 10 December 1926. He joined the army 1 January 1945 but was discharged 6 June to join the Palestine Police 7 June 1945. On 14 June 1946 he was in charge of a Police armoury when he issued a rifle and 10 rounds of ammunition to a fake Temporary Constable. He was fined 7 days pay and the cost of the rifle and ammunition. 
24 August 1947 while on motorbike patrol he had an accident and was admitted to the Government Hospital, Jerusalem. He was reported to be seriously ill and his mother unsuccessfully applied to fly to Jerusalem to be with him. He made a full recovery and the investigation found that “B/Constable Evans was injured in the execution of his duties. That such injuries were not due to his own default. That B/C Evans suffered a fractured pelvis,”
He was discharged from the Palestine Police 21 May 1948. His discharge certificate stated “Smart, reliable and hardworking.” Another document “Constable Evans carried out his duties in a very satisfactory manner. During his service he passed the M.C. drivers test. A reliable police officer.” (He passed the Motor Cycle Test 12 September 1946.) He returned to the UK on SS Strathnaver, leaving Haifa 22 May 1948. 
31 March 1950 he joined Oxford City Police
30 January 1958 he transferred to Berkshire Police. In 1977 he was awarded the Silver Jubilee Medal (Thames Valley Police). Retired 18 November 1979. His reports stated that he was “highly regarded by the younger members of the station” and that his conduct had been “Exemplary”. He died March 1993 in Metheringham, Lincolnshire. 

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Detective Superintendent Thomas James (Tom) Wilkin. Kings Police Medal for Distinguished Service, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service, General Service Medal clasp Palestine,(1936-1939), Defence Medal and War medal.

Born 1909 in Aldeborough, Suffolk, he joined the Palestine Police on 10th April, 1931 as Constable 956 and gained promotion on merit. A well respected officer, decorated for his arrest of Irgun and Stern Gang members.

bpp medals 007.jpg

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That's a rare group not many police got the silver jubilee medal. And for a PC rare as hens teeth

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ID: 6   Posted (edited)

The information on Richards suggest what I would have supposed, that most of th 'British Constables' were ex-military.   The Police Mobile Force established in 1944 was made up of British servicemen and the whole force was made laibel for military service during WWII, which argues military rather than police origins, IMO.

It was very much a paramilitary force and previous service and hence 'reliability' were probably more important than extensive police experience.  It's also likely the case that not a lot of British coppers would have been lining up for work out there, for various reasons and ex-servicemen have always provided a ready pool of 'good men' in the far reches of the Empire!

My tuppence worth.

Peter 

Edited by peter monahan

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19 hours ago, peter monahan said:

The information on Richards suggest what I would have supposed, that most of th 'British Constables' were ex-military.   The Police Mobile Force established in 1944 was made up of British servicemen and the whole force was made laibel for military service during WWII, which argues military rather than police origins, IMO.

It was very much a paramilitary force and previous service and hence 'reliability' were probably more important than extensive police experience.  It's also likely the case that not a lot of British coppers would have been lining up for work out there, for various reasons and ex-servicemen have always provided a ready pool of 'good men' in the far reches of the Empire!

My tuppence worth.

Peter 

 

Thanks Peter, I think you might be right. From what little information I've been able to ascertain on them, they appear to be a police force in the loosest possible sense on the term and were more readily a military force as you have suggested. 

On 2/4/2016 at 09:46, Craig said:

That's a rare group not many police got the silver jubilee medal. And for a PC rare as hens teeth

I wonder how many Silver Jubilee Medals were issued to the police? From what I've heard from military circles it was persons like the CO, RSM and the youngest solider in the regiment that were awarded one...?

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If you want to know about the Palestine Police read the definitive history, "A Job Well Done" by Edward HORN. There is a copy currently on eBay. An outstanding book!

Dave.

 

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Thanks, dave, for that info.  Given the political situation in Palestine, and the British Imperial tradition of 'police forces' who were actually soldiers, I think it a safe bet that many if not most of the Palestine Police were ex-Army.

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3 hours ago, peter monahan said:

Thanks, dave, for that info.  Given the political situation in Palestine, and the British Imperial tradition of 'police forces' who were actually soldiers, I think it a safe bet that many if not most of the Palestine Police were ex-Army.

Many thanks Peter.

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The search to track down a copy of this book, that isn't going to require a remortgage of my home, nearly got one for just under £30.............

 

But going down another avenue of the Palestine Police if I may, can anyone tell me what range of numbers they used for collar numbers and did they re use them? I've found examples of medals to men with just two digits right up to 3000? I assume they started at 1 in 1920 so to have got to 3000, by 1948 isn't unrealistic. Assuming that they didn't reuse numbers, is there a roll by which you can put a name to a number? 

 

 

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