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This is my first question or comment,only joined this morning.

Do the service records survive for colonial police officer's? especially Jamaica and Uganda.

Thanks,

Iain.

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I worked somewhat closely with the Jamaica Constabulary Force and Commissioner Ricketts from 1986-9.  JCF's National HQ [address:  101-103 Old Hope Road, Kingston 6] had almost complete personnel records from about 1870 until Hurricane Gilbert [1988].  Before Gilbert, some materials, especially including those from the 1880's. 1890's and 1920's, were missing or damaged.  Very likely Gilbert ruined additional items.  I left Jamaica in 1989 and do not know the current state of JCF records or access rules.   As might be expected, customary Commonwealth time period/privacy embargos on personnel records prohibit release of certain materials.  

It may be that copies of records exist in British  Foreign & Commonwealth Office holdings.

 

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Thanks for quick reply,I will try writing to the commissioner,let you know how I get on.In the meantime I will try the foreign and commonwealth office.

Thanks for the information.

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George F. Quallo [I do not know him] is the current JCF commissioner.  A Deputy Commissioner responsible for public information position exists if the JCF organization retains the same structure as in the '80's.  Likely, an on-line search will reveal email points of contact but a snail mail inquiry may obtain better results.  

I've no idea whether 'historical' police personnel records remain in Kampala archives.  A late 1990's visit there suggested that various regime changes resulted in destruction of many old records.  FCO may be a viable option for these.   Some African countries have 'old boy' uniformed services organizations which may offer another research option.

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You might try contacting the Ugandan Embassy as well, to enquire whether or not those records are available in country if kew doesn't have them.  I know that, for Inida, the records stayed in country and are, sadly, almost inaccessible, but perhaps you'll get lucky!  Good luck in the hunt.

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