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johannis

Austria Tapferskeitmedaille in Bronze with bar.

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johannis   

Hello.
I believe is original, but I also want the opinion
From more experienced collectors like me.
The ribbon bar has no maker marks.
Exist at all fake ribbon bars?
The ribbon does not glow under blacklight, but the hook is uncommon
and look as is from aluminum.
Please your opinion.
Every comment is welcome.
Thanks, Jannis.

 

IMG_20170607_090343.jpg

2.jpg

1.jpg

IMG_20170607_081348.jpg

IMG_20170607_081403.jpg

Edited by johannis

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spolei   

Hello,
the medal looks good, but I think the ribbon and the bars are not from WW1.
It is the first threetime-bar I see. I only know the single and the double bar..
I thougt the bar is only for the silver medal not for the bronce medal.

 

 

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johannis   

Hello.
Thank you very much for your comment.
I've tried in the web and have
no information found.
Regards, Jannis.

 

Edited by johannis

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tifes   

Hi Jannis,

 

Medal is A-H Bronze Medal for Bravery. It seems to absolutely OK. It´s one of the most common A-H decorations, awarded more than 950.000 times, not counting in so-called “second pieces” (medals purchased privately). Ribbon is older one, however it seems to be post-1918 (1930s). Bar for 4x awarding doesn’t look like original for me. These 4x bars are really rare and copies are very common.  First suspicious sign is that bar is not sewn on the ribbon and there is also no maker´s mark or hallmark (sometimes they were made of silver). It doesn’t mean that the bar without any maker´s mark must be a fake however if it is there it´s better, of course. It is also good to mention that makers´ marks could be faked too. Absolutely most common maker´s mark is the one of “Zimbler” company.

 

Bronze Bravery medal could awarded 4 times, like any other AH Bravery Medal (Silver II. Class, Silver I. Class and Gold)  

 

First picture is showing faked mark of Zimbler, second one is an original Zimbler maker´s mark.  

 

Regards,

 

Tomas

COPY.jpg

Zimbler-Original.jpg

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johannis   

Hello Tomas.
Thank you very much for your comment.
All three parts are unworn,it could be a purchased privately in the 20s - 30s,
or not, I hope one day I'll find it.
For me is a great looking medal.
Thanks again for your endeavors
Regards,Jannis.
 

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bazsi   

Hello Jannis,

IMO the multiple award bar and the ribbon looks like a modern copy. These ribboons used to be late 20st century copies. The medal is a very nice original bravery medal.

Regards,

Balazs

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spolei   

:thumbup:
very nice collection.
What is the difference between the silver bar and the bar with swords?
regards Andreas

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tifes   

Hi everyone,

silver bars were for Bravery Medals but also for Silver Military Merit Medals (2x,1x) and Iron Merit Cross with or without crown when enemy wasn´t faced directly.  Silver bars with swords were for Silver Military Merit Medals (2x,1x) when officer faced an enemy directly (mostly on battlefield).

There also had been golden bars for other decorations  - 2x golden bars with or without swords for Military Merit Cross with War Decoration (WD) and 1x golden bar with or without swords for LO-R with WD, EKO III with WD, FJO-R on the ribbon of Military Merit Cross, Golden Merit Cross with crown on the ribbon of Military Merit Cross and Large Silver Military Merit Medal.

I think that I have covered them all. Those with "K" had been for Golden/Silver Bravery Medals for Officers. Awarded originals are rare, mostly we see privately purchased pieces or post-1918 ones.

One more thing...it was quite common that NCO awarded twice or three times with Golden Bravery Medal had the bars made of gold, which wasn’t allowed by army regulations but tolerated. Those NCOs were seen as superheroes with widespread rumour (pilots, submariners, stormtroopers) and army authorities turned the blind eye on this practise.

Regards,

Tifes/Tomas

   

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