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oamotme

Miniatures of the Middle East & Arab World

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Good morning from Riyadh,

The Arabic reads, 'Al Nil' (the Nile).

The miniature of the Republican Order of the Nile is a scarce item as the order is a one class order - star, sash and sash badge. I attach an image of miniature group to a South American minister or similar which includes such a miniature.

Kind regards,

Owain

P.S. Over the years I have acquired piecemeal - a full size breast star, a sash,  a case,  but no sash badge...........if there is one out there please let me know!

 

South_America_Miniatures_Bar_2_Obverse.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Owain, thanks for your illustrations of these minis. It brings up another design aspect that I am curious whether you can help explain. This group above shows a number of "bands" or "wings" associated with the rosettes (gold-colored for the miniature Republic version of the Order of the Nile). We have had a lively discussion of these on another GMIC thread about the miniatures of the Venezuelan Orden del Libertador ("Venezuela-Order of the Bust of Bolivar-Question" started by lars001on 25 December, 2017 in the "Rest of the World: Military & History" section). First, I wonder if you know what the correct term for this decorative element is? Additionally, what do you know about any variation in the appearance or use of these "wings"? You illustrated a miniature Kingdom of Egypt Order of the Nile on 11 December, 2017 (lower left, 2nd from the left on the ribbon bar with 2 miniatures) that shows the ribbon rosette with a gold-colored set of "wings". I came across a couple images (below) from a current eBay auction showing a miniature of the Kingdom version of the Order of the Nile with silver-colored such "wings" on the ribbon. Although I've looked at several internet images of ribbons for this Kingdom of Egypt era award with rosettes (4th class), only your illustrated mini and the one below show these "wing" features. I am curious what information you can provide about these! 

large.s-l1600.jpg.466221899a4683c8e02cafbc6467554e.jpg

Image of a miniature Order of the Nile medal from a group of 7 miniatures offered for sale together on a current eBay auction.  (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ribbon-Bar-7-MINIATURES-Order-medal-Belguim-France-Marocco-Sweden-Egypt-Italy-/372219657345)

large.s-l1600-1.jpg.2d9ac019f6dd4e52d04dd194307decb6.jpg

Detailed view of the ribbon & rosette with silver-colored "wings" for the same miniature Order of the Nile medal, illustrated from a group of 7 miniatures on a current eBay auction. (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ribbon-Bar-7-MINIATURES-Order-medal-Belguim-France-Marocco-Sweden-Egypt-Italy-/372219657345)

Edited by Rusty Greaves

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In essence the wings and rosettes designate the class or degree of an order when worn in miniature:

  • Gold & rosette - 1st Class
  • Half gold / half silver - 2nd Class
  • Silver - 3rd Class
  • Rosette only - 4th Class
  • Ribbon only - 5th class

As to what their technical term is, upon reflection I have no idea - there is probably a French word for them.

Owain

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Owain, thanks for the rapid reply & clarification. I just want to confirm what you've outlined means that the wings are only worn with miniatures for designating the class of the award? 

Here is another example of a miniature Kingdom-era Order of the Nile medal with some minor design variation compared with those previously illustrated. This is from a January 2018 auction on eBay. (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/372202693345?clk_rvr_id=1487114366260&rmvSB=true).

large.s-l1600-2.jpg.6384d20fddd1ffe16af7caafb97190fd.jpg

Obverse view of a Kingdom of Egypt-era miniature Order of the Nile from a past eBay auction. It is identified as made of silver and as the "5th Class" of this award, but probably is the 4th Class (because of the rosette on the ribbon) This example has a variation in the configuration of the suspension device that is seen in some examples previously illustrated on this thread. The most noticeable design variation from other examples shown in previous posts here is the narrower width of the Khedival crown portion of the suspension attaching to the link ring. (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Miniature-Medal-Group-1WW-Coronation-1937-and-Egypt-Order-of-the-Nile-5th-Class-/372202693345?rmvSB=true&clk_rvr_id=1487114366260&nma=true&si=EdnxlJchhEz4pHCHK4ZZ5CyX0a4%3D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557)

large.s-l1600-3.jpg.0b60eeba3a82b8d6d5da78d64f71b171.jpg

Reverse view of the same Kingdom of Egypt-era miniature Order of the Nile medal on a bar exhibiting 3 other miniatures as part of this group, from a January 2018 eBay auction (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Miniature-Medal-Group-1WW-Coronation-1937-and-Egypt-Order-of-the-Nile-5th-Class-/372202693345?rmvSB=true&clk_rvr_id=1487114366260&nma=true&si=EdnxlJchhEz4pHCHK4ZZ5CyX0a4%3D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557)

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Posted (edited)

Here is another example of variant design execution on a miniature Order of the Nile. This image is from a current auction of La Galerie Numismatique/Sixbid.com

large.3837425l.jpg.16c1cab8b6e48253097da2ff61d06d9d.jpg

Miniature Order of the Nile identified correctly as the Officer version (4th Class) with some variant design elements. Unlike all other examples of miniatures shown in this thread, this medal features diamond facets only along the primary central rays of each arm on the star design and a very open set of fewer relief spheres forming the medallion margin for the inscription. This example appears to have no enamel in the inscription, it is unclear if this is a design variation or if the enamel could be missing for another reason. The given dimensions of the medal are 27 x 17 mm in diameter. Only the central medallion is identified as gilt (gold?). (https://www.sixbid.com/browse.html?auction=4662&category=133592&lot=3837425)

Edited by Rusty Greaves
correction

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Regarding use of wings and rosettes to indicate award grade, perhaps an Egyptian implementation regulation or other guidance exists to clearly define or regulate these marks.   Protocole [1947, p. 96] provides only that rosettes shall not exceed a 1 cm. diameter and that only one, of the highest award, may be worn at the button-hole in street attire.   However, Order of Ismail and Nile rosettes [at a minimum] exist in at least 7, 10 & 12 mm. diameter sizes

As Owain notes, wings and rosettes differentiate between grades of awards in many instances.  Exceptions do occur, such as addition of another type of device to suspension ribbons indicating degrees.  Examples include the U.S. Legion of Merit or Presidential Medal of Freedom.  As Owain suggests [because rosettes and wings seem to have originated in France], French seems the appropriate language to describe these distinctive class or rank indication marks.

Donc, d'un vendeur de détail français, en français: 

Pour Chevalier : un ruban fin de 1 à 3 mm de large à coudre au niveau de la boutonnière (existe également en « prêt à fixer » appellé fixe-ruban qui est un ruban monté sur agrafe (longueur du ruban apparent : 1,5 cm). Il existe une version spéciale pour dame, il s’agit d’un nœud qui permet de le fixer sur tout vêtement.

pour Officier : une Rosette de 6mm sur bouton ou pin qui se fixe au revers de veste au niveau de la boutonnière.

pour Commandeur : une Rosette sur galon blanc

pour Grand Officier : une Rosette sur galon blanc et or

pour Grand Croix : une Rosette sur galon tout or

 

Sizes for these appurtenances may be set by respective decoration description or statute but more often by practical usage or personal preference.  Galon translates as braid.  Usually galon blanc equates to silver braid and galon or to gold braid.  Cheaper substitutes may be used as well.

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Merci beaucoup. In addition to being worn on miniatures, the 'galon' (new word to me) is also worn in undress uniform when only the ribbons are worn.

With regard to the Order of the Nile, from my experience the badge of the 4th and the 5th class is the same with the class being differentiated by the rosette on the ribbon and the designation on the case of the award.

I attach another miniature group which I displayed in a Romanian thread on GMIC last year - there is also a Nile here - from the 'galon' it is a 2nd Class award.

Regards, Owain

Minis_France_Diplomatic_Romania_11_Obv_.jpg

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Below is a photograph identified as the Grand Officer Class miniature of the Egyptian Order of the Republic. Owain has illustrated a miniature of this medal here in this thread on 12 December, 2017, that may have some greater detail in its execution compared with this medal (2nd photo, 4th medal from the right, with a green, white & red colored ribbon). That example shows at least 2 divisions in the blue enameled frame of the central medallion, possibly some differences in the length of the enameled arms compared with the rays of the embellishment star below, and has the Republic's eagle on the suspension device. Owain's example has slightly different ribbon colors from the correct colors illustrated below. 

Egypt Order of the Republic mini.jpg

From: the Liveauctioneers website, an auction listing of 23 November, 2013, Lot 0214. It is identified as silver gilt, 17 mm in diameter, with original suspension ring, ribbon, & rosette with galon exhibiting gold on L and silver on R, correct for the Grand Officer Class. Manufacturer is not specified.  (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/21114502_order-of-the-republic)

Below are a few examples of the full-sized Order of the Republic award to show design differences of the miniature. 

Order of the Republic Grand Cordon 1st Class Type I c 1953.jpg

For comparison, here is a full-sized example of the GrandCordon (1st Class ) Order of the Republic in its earliest Type I form (1953-1958?) with light blue enamel on the arms and an arabesques suspension device. Made by Tewfik Bichay. From eMedals, identified as c.1953, the sash badge measures 62 mm wide X 79 mm high. the chest star measures 92 mm wide X 93 mm high. (https://www.emedals.com/egypt-republic-an-order-of-the-republic-1st-class-grand-cordon-c-1953)


Order of the Republic type II 1958-71.jpg

Picture of 1st Class breast star of the Order of the Republic, Type II from eMedals. Made by Tewfik Bichay, measures 79 mm X 79 mm in diameter. Note dark blue enamel on the arms and the eagle suspension device. This design is identified as covering 1958-1971. (https://www.emedals.com/an-early-egyptian-order-of-the-republic-1958-1971-w1756)

Order of the Republic Grand Cross 1sr Class 1984-persent .jpg
 

Image of 1st Class Order of the Republic full-sized sash badge (R) and chest star (L) from eMedals. Made by Tewfik Bichay, the sash badge measures 63 mm wide X 83.5 mm high and the chest badge measures 79.5 mm wide X 84.5 mm high. This is identified as the 1971/72 - present form of the design. It is nearly identical to the previous Type II example except for a few differences in the form of the eagle suspension device: the form of the eagle compared with the earlier example, the lack of the 2 stars in the central white enamel stripe in the shield on the eagle, and a slightly longer legend under the eagle. (https://www.emedals.com/the-egyptian-order-of-the-republic-grand-cross-set-w1759)

Full-sized examples of an interesting variant of the Order of the Republic also can be seen on the thread "An Egyptian Unit Award: The Military Order of the Republic", started by ChrisW on 27 January, 2017 here in the Middle East & Arab States section. In that thread, ChrisW describes & illustrates a variant of the Order of Republic awarded to military units, issued in a single class, that is identical in form with the 1st Class of the individual award (except for a 5-pointed star on the lower portion of the medal). ChrisW also provides several useful details on this award. His example of the Military Order of the Republic is a Type II example, with dark blue enamel on the arms and an eagle suspension device. Owain illustrates an earlier version of this same award (Type I) in his post of 8 April, 2017 on that thread, which has the light blue enamel on the arms and an arabesques as the suspension device. 

 

 

 

Edited by Rusty Greaves

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