Jump to content

Rusty Greaves

Silver Membership
  • Content Count

    907
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Rusty Greaves

  • Rank
    Full Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Salt Lake City
  • Interests
    archaeology, anthropology, behavioral ecology, history, music, beer

Contact Methods

  • Yahoo
    rustygreaves@yahoo.com

Recent Profile Visitors

5,223 profile views
  1. Below is a low resolution image of a miniature of the Order of Ismail from a current Liverpool Medals auction (https://www.liverpoolmedals.com/product/order-of-ismail-commander), SKU L28804. The auction description correctly identifies it as a 3rd Class award and provides measurements of 30 mm (height) x 20 mm (width). There is no additional information except a condition statement provided in the description. The 3rd Class Commander is denoted by the silver galon and rosette on the ribbon. This example appears to be same mini I illustrated as the first of 2 miniature Order of Ismail in my post of 10 November, 2018 in very high-resolution photos of both minis. These 2 minis were listed on a 2018 auction of La Galerie Numismatique that also was featured on the Sixbid.com website (no longer archived on the internet). I also illustrated this same mini the as the 4th photo (only moderate resolution) of my post of 1 November, 2019 on this thread showing a moderate resolution image of that mini, along with the same 4th Class Knight mini that appeared in the 2018 La Galerie Numismatique auction, from an October 2018 Spink auction. The below illustrations add a photo of the reverse of this mini from the Liverpool Medals website, not present in the previous auction listings. This image of the obverse of this mini can be zoomed for a bit more detail. Compared with the very high-resolution image in my post of 10 November, 2018, the details of the rosette show that this is the identical ribbon. Other aspects of the faceted and rayed embellishment also show that this is the same miniature badge. The red stripes on the left side of the rosette show identical exposure and configuration of the blue threads with the 10 November image. Wear on the lower red stripe and the center blue one (between the upper red stripe) on the right margin of the rosette also are identical in the 10 November image of this miniature badge. Additionally, the parts of the crown suspension that appear red are the same as can be seen in the high-resolution 10 November illustration. The reverse of the same miniature Order of Ismail chest badge. None of the previous auction listings of this medal showed the reverse of this badge. No hallmarks are visible on the reverse of this low resolution image. Of interest, it shows the 2 piece construction with the facetted and rayed embellishment and crown suspension device as one piece and the gold (plated?) and enamel star as a separate component of the construction of this miniature. .
  2. Below is a low resolution image of a miniature of the Order of Ismail from a current Liverpool Medals auction (https://www.liverpoolmedals.com/product/order-of-ismail-commander), SKU L28804. The auction description correctly identifies it as a 3rd Class award and provides measurements of 30 mm (height) x 20 mm (width). There is no additional information except a condition statement provided in the description. The 3rd Class Commander is denoted by the silver galon and rosette on the ribbon. This example appears to be same mini I illustrated as the upper image of the 3rd photo of 2 miniature Order of Ismail my post of 10 November, 2018 on this thread, in very high-resolution photos of both minis. These 2 minis were listed on a 2018 auction of La Galerie Numismatique that also was featured on the Sixbid.com website (no longer archived on the internet). I also illustrated this same mini the as the 4th photo (only moderate resolution) of my post of 1 November, 2019 on the thread “Question about the Order of Ismail/Nishan al-Ismail” in this section Middle East & Arab States”, along with the same 4th Class Knight mini that appeared in the 2018 La Galerie Numismatique auction, from an October 2018 Spink auction. The below illustrations include a photo of the reverse of this mini from the Liverpool Medals website, not present in the previous auction listings. This image of the obverse of this mini can be zoomed for a bit more detail. Compared with the very high-resolution image in my post of 10 November, 2018, the details of the rosette show that this is the identical ribbon. Other aspects of the faceted and rayed embellishment also show that this is the same miniature badge. The red stripes on the left side of the rosette show identical exposure and configuration of the blue threads with the 10 November image. Wear on the lower red stripe and the center blue one (between the upper red stripe) on the right margin of the rosette also are identical in the 10 November image of this miniature badge. Additionally, the parts of the crown suspension that appear red are the same as can be seen in the high-resolution 10 November illustration. The reverse of the same miniature Order of Ismail chest badge. None of the previous auction listings of this medal showed the reverse of this badge. A comparable image of the reverse of a miniature Order of Ismail is seen in the upper photo of Owain's post of 12 December, 2017 (upper row, 2nd medal from the right) on this thread. No hallmarks are visible on the reverse of this low-resolution image. Of interest, it shows the 2-piece construction with the facetted and rayed embellishment and crown suspension device as one piece and the gold (plated?) and enamel star as a separate component of the construction of this miniature.
  3. 922F, many thanks for your comment. I am woefully ignorant of the British form of sashes. I really appreciate your information that the narrow, unpinked form of the decorative bow, and the fringed, unpinked margin of the sash is a British form. I mistakenly thought it was an Egyptian variant of the sash. In response to your comment, I have tried to look at photos of sashes for British awards and see why you posed this question. This is the only example I have seen of the Order of Ismail with this sash form. The Eisenhower example has an unpinked bow, but the form of the bow and the pinked margin of the sash is the same as all other Grand Cordon examples I have come across in my research. Unfortunately, the Grand Cordon set shown in the 15 January post is not identified with any award recipient. I know very little about how most of the individuals I have identified (either as just names or through photos) have received their Order of Ismail awards, and am afraid I do not now if the choice of such a sash form was on offer from the King of Egypt or may represent a possible after-the-fact construction by folks who wanted a British form of the sash. I have no information about who was the recipient of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Ismail from an April 2018 auction by La Galerie Numismatique (https://www.coins-la-galerie-numismatique.com/auction-xxxviii-day-1/order-ismail) that also is archived on the liveauctioneers.com website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/60483636_order-of-ismail) that I illustrated in my first post of 15 January, 2020 (and on 22 February, 2019 showing some of the hallmarks; on the sash badge the date hallmark is "B" for 1927-1928, and a date hallmark of "C" on the breast star, indicating and assay date of 1928-1929). The three British Governor--Generals of the Sudan who I discussed in my post of 25 November, 2019 (Sir Geoffrey Francis Archer, Sir John Loader Maffey, and Sir George Stewart Symes) were British citizens, but wore their Grand Cordon Class Order of Ismail awards with the standard Egyptian form of the sash. This seems logical as the awards from King Fuad I may have been given to emphasize that the Governor-Generals were serving Egypt's interests in the Sudan as a pointed criticism of Britain's condominium form of administration. They would have worn their regalia principally in relation to serving in that role. Now that you have educated me about this possibility, I will keep my eyes open should any indication that a choice of sash forms was possible in my future searches of auction examples and photos of individuals wearing the Order of Ismail.
  4. Below are the additional images of the 2nd Class Order of Ismail from the three La Galerie Numismatique auction offering that remained unsold from the March, June, and September 2013 auctions, archived on the liveauctioneers.com website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/15928155_order-of-ismail). These are the 2 photos that accompanied the image of he neck badge and breast star I included as the 3rdimage in my recent post of 1 February above. Image of the obverse of the neck badge of this La Galerie Numismatique set, again showing the anomalous/unique form of engraving on the gold and blue enameled arms of the star. As with the picture of the complete set, this image is a very popularly downloaded online image used to represent the design of the Order of Ismail. The even lighting of this photo shows the engraving in very good detail. The image can be zoomed a bit. Only the arms of the star with the different engraving raise the question about whether this may be a genuine variant form of the Order of Ismail. However, some elements of the central medallion appear to be inconsistent with several other Lattes made neck badges and sash badges. For example, this piece has a different pattern of the gold dot fruits and the red-enameled bands of the wreath are thinner and less evenly executed with all other photos of neck badges I have seen for Lattes made Order of Ismail regalia. The crown suspension device is the same as on other Lattes badges. The margin of one Egyptian gold hallmark can be seen on the right side link of the superior arm of the star to the crown suspension device, as is present in photos of all other Lattes sash badges and neck badges of this Order. I am now looking at some other minor variation in engraving on sash and neck badges and will post a more systematic comparison in the future. Image of the reverse of the neck badge and breast star of this same set. Although this photo can be zoomed a small amount, the detail is not good enough to read the gold hallmarks of the neck badge or the silver hallmarks on the breast star. As noted in my previous post about this set, it does show the location of these hallmarks. The low level of details in this photo provide no reason to suspect that there is anything odd about the reverse boss of the central medallion of the neck badge showing the Lattes maker’s mark and gold hallmarks or the facetted and rayed embellishment and reverse boss of the central medallion of the breast star. Additionally, the reverse of the arms of the gold star visible in the image of the neck badge and breast star don’t show anything that appears odd. Above is the very high-resolution image of the reverse of the reverse of the same Grand Cordon example of the Order of Ismail whose obverse is shown in the 1st photo of my post of 31 January above showing the January 30, 2020 auction listing on the Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG website, Auction 331, Lot 1704 (https://www.kuenker.de/en/auktionen/stueck/251846). The complete set of Egyptian silver hallmarks I described in the 31 January post can readily be read if this image is zoomed. The reverse of the gold arms of the star show a significant number of scratches principally in one direction on the 2:00, 5:00, and 7:00 arms and in 2 directions on the arm in the 10:00 and 12:00 positions. These arms appear to be flat on their reverse side. The best images of the reverse of these arms on unquestionably genuine examples come from eMedals excellent photographic documentation of auction pieces and hallmarks showing some preferred orientation of scratches, but not as in this Künker example. There are many fewer scratches and more random scratches. Additionally, several high-quality images from eMedals listings clearly show that the arms are slightly concave, unlike this January 2020 Künker piece (see below). Reverse of one of the arms of the gold star of a Grand Cordon Class breast star of the Order of Ismail from a pre-2016 eMedals auction showing the slightly concave form of the reverse of this arm, in contrast with the Künker example above (https://www.emedals.com/order-of-ismail-1915-w01271). It also shows the lack of the kind of scratches seen on the Künker Grand Cordon breast star. The "F" hallmark identifies a manufacturing/assay date of 1931-1932. I previously included this photo as the 5th-to-last image in my post of 11 January, 2019 in a discussion of hallmarks (and incorrectly captioned it as a Grand Officer Class breast star).
  5. While chasing down the La Galerie Numismatique image of the strangely engraved 2nd Class Grand Officer Order of Ismail that I included as the 2nd and 3rd photos in my most recent post, I came across the image below that also is archived on the same liveauctioneers.com website. As discussed in my recent post of January 15, 2020 here addressing the form of the decorative bows for the Grand Cordon sash, I want to include this image as another example of the form of the bow configuration. Moderate-resolution photo of a cased Grand Cordon Order of Ismail from a May 2010 auction (Lot 0113) of La Galerie Numismatique that is archived on the liveauctioneers.com website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/7368616_113-order-of-ismail). This catalog page set of images shows a cased sash and sash badge for an offering that lacks the breast star for this set. The medal bed is missing showing some detail of the push release mechanism in the case (as seen in the 4th photo of my 21 October, 2019 post on this thread). The auction description provides minimal information other than confirming that J. Lattes is the manufacturer of this sash and sash badge, obvious from what is visible of the interior case lid. The auction listing notes the presence of gold hallmarks, but provides no information about those marks. The case lid shows the cipher of King Fuad I that only helps to situate the date of this piece to sometime between post-1922 (when it appears that King Fuad I's cipher changed from that used in the sultanate, as seen in my discussion of case form variation in examples of the Order of the Nile in the first post of 21 October, 2019) until 1936. The above image shows the two decorative sash bows that have pinking of their margins above a lower single bow that is hemmed. The few photos I have been able to find of sashes for the Grand Cordon Class Order of Ismail that clearly show how the bow is tied generally show this form of the decorative bow with two bows that have pinked margins overlying a single basal bow that has a hemmed edge (the 5th - 6th photos of the 15 January post), for a total of 3 bows. The only photo that shows a different configuration of this combination is the example in the 7th photo of my 15 January post that shows an example from December 2017 auction by Spink & Son, Auction that has two bows with hemmed edges below the two pinked bows (for a total of 4 bows). The Eisenhower example in the 4th photo of that post also has 3 bows, although none have pinked edges. That also appears to be the configuration of the complete cased set from the April 2018 auction by La Galerie Numismatique that is shown in the 2nd photo of the 15 January post. As seen for most of the sashes for the Grand Cordon of this order, the ends of the above La Galerie Numismatique example's sash also show pinking.
  6. I just came across an odd example a 1st Class Grand Cordon breast star of the Order of Ismail breast from a January 30, 2020 auction listing on the Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG website, Auction 331, Lot 1704 (https://www.kuenker.de/en/auktionen/stueck/251846). This includes very high resoltion images of the obverse and reverse of this breast star and pretty good cropped images of the hallmarks from the reverse, The same offering also is archived on the NumisBids.com website (https://www.numisbids.com/n.php?p=lot&sid=3630&lot=1074). The Numisbids.com listing has the same high-resolution image of the obverse, but only a washed out, partial image of the reverse. No image of the hallmarks is in the Numisbids.com archived listing of this auction. The breast star is not associated with its neck badge or a case. The auction listing identifies the dimensions as 82.0 mm x 80.5 mm, without any clarification of which measurement represents the wider dimension. This is consistent with the size of the Grand Cordon breast star given for most other examples where measurements are provided. There are no gold hallmarks visible on the reverse of the gold arms in the high-resolution image provided. The silver hallmarks are detailed in the description and shown on a photo of the reverse of the breast star and in smaller close-up cropped image. A full set of 3 Egyptian silver hallmarks is present on the left principal embellishment ray to the left of the main central ray. No hallmarks are present on other portions of the embellishment and none are visible on the tunic pin. The description correctly identifies the Cairo assay office silver purity mark as 900 silver. The second hallmark is the cat (with raised tail), which is associated with marking Egyptian made silver between 1916-1946. The auction description (and photos) show the date hallmark to be “Y”, but the listing identifies that as indicating 1948 (which would have technically been associated with a lotus blossom Egyptian silver mark, but also see the commemorative coin example I illustrated for the closing of the Egyptian Mixed Courts in October, 1949 that employed the cat hallmark rather than the “correct” lotus blossom hallmark for Egyptian silver made after 1946 on the last photo [14th] in my post of 22 February, 2019 on this thread). The “Y” hallmark actually was used for 1923-1924. The description does identify Lattes as the manufacturer of this breast star and the hallmark close-up image provided in the listing on Numisbids.com does illustrate this. The strange(st) thing about this example is the form of the engraving decoration on the gold floral designs on the obverse of gold arms of the five-pointed gold star with blue enamel. I previously encountered a different image of a similar engraved 2nd Class Grand Officer breast star on flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/8843698381), and of that same 2nd Class breast star and neck badge in another image on the same flickr photostream (https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/8844318688/), but failed to notice the anomalous engraving on the arms. Other than these 2 examples, I have not seen another photo of any Order of Ismail regalia with this kind of engraving on those gold floral patterns. Comparing the January 2020 Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG photo, I thought this might be a chimera mix of some genuine, but potentially unassociated, elements with the seemingly anomalously engraved arms of the gold and enamel star. Either this represents a genuine variant of the Lattes execution of the Order of Ismail, or a wily workshop fabricating odd pieces for sale to an unsuspecting market. Because I have only seen 2 such examples in my research, I am unsure which scenario is more likely. On all other examples I have seen, this engraved decoration conforms with the general style shown in the examples starting as the 4th photos below for the all breast stars, sash badges, neck badges, and breast badges in all classes of the Order of Ismail. When I reviewed other examples, I did see some variation in how this engraving was executed across other genuine examples of Lattes-made pieces. As shown below, the more common form of engraving on Lattes Order of Ismail regalia is essentially the same as that used for the Tewfik Bichay examples and even the recent monarchy-in-exile ELM-made breast stars (I have not yet found photos of sash or neck badges that ELM might have made). The only significant difference I have seen in execution of this engraving of unquestionably genuine Order of Ismail regalia is the apparent lack of any engraving on the gold floral elements on a few illustrations of pieces made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay (i.e., on Owain’s 3rd class neck badge example that can be seen in the 4th photo he illustrated in his post of 5 April, 2018 on this thread; and possibly on a set made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay from a Sixbid.com auction of November 2012 shown in the 2nd-to-last photo of my post of 11 January, 2019, however that photo is not high-enough resolution to confirm a lack of engraving; I discussed this lack of engraving in my post of 21 April, 2018 in this thread). Perhaps this has made me overly suspicious, but I also think there may also be some anomalies in the form of the “LATT…” letters on the reverse compared with most illustrations I have seen of the LATTES maker’s hallmark. However, a few additional aspects of the obverse design, detailed below, also are outliers among a few illustrated auction examples of Lattes-made Grand Cordon and Grand Officer breast stars of the Order of Ismail. Very high-resolution image of the obverse of the Fritz Rudolf Künker Auction 331, Lot 1074 example, identified as a Grand Cordon breast star, that has completely anomalous engraving pattern on the gold floral decorations of the 5 gold & enamel arms of the star. This image can be zoomed to see this more clearly. The form of this engraving can be contrasted with the other examples illustrated below (that I have previously posted on this thread) for comparison. If I use the superior arm of the star for reference (although the light angle makes aspects of the left upper arm’s engraving clearer), the lowermost central stem portion exhibits a double line outlining the margins only at the superior portion. On all other examples, this portion of the design has a single engraved line extending from the inferior portion of this element to the superior portion, and that engraving is broader at the superior end. While the engraving on the lateral arms extending to each side of this portion of the design is similar with other examples, they originate higher on the central stem (touching each of the double lines on the central portion. They also show a more curled termination at the lateral end of each of these elements. It also is apparent that these laterals are thicker than seen on the examples I illustrate below, having almost the same width along their entire length. In contrast, those shown below, have the engraving originating near the inferior portion of the central design element. The Pinterest example below does show a tighter curl at the lateral margins, but the Bukowski and eMedals examples do not. It also is apparent that these “tendrils” are thinner at their origin and expand at their terminations (however, the ELM example shown below does not have this graceful expansion, and the Tewfik Bichay example has a less pronounced terminal expansion than the Lattes examples). The most obvious other difference, and this pertains to all of the engraving on the Künker example, is the much greater shallowness of all of the engraved lines compared with every other example I have seen. The lozenge superior to this element, where the 2 central flowers originate, is broader than seen in the photos below, and is concave, rather than engraved, the stems of the 2 central flowers have engraved lines, which are completely absent in the other Lattes examples, Tewfik Bichay, and ELM photos shown below. The engraving of the 2 central flowers is completely different than seen on the examples below. The 2 Lattes and one ELM examples have 3 simple engraved marks expanding from their inferior origin extending to each lateral margin and one engraved line running to the superior end of the medial petal portion of the design. The Tewfik Bichay example below only exhibits 3 engraved lines within these 2 blossoms. In contrast, the 3 simple, deeply engraved lines are elaborated in the Künker example with additional curls and outlines of the terminal petals. The 2 tendrils supporting the superior distal blossom are more similar in the Künker example to the others shown below, but lack the delicacy seen in the Lattes example below. They are more similar to the form in the Tewfik Bichay and ELM examples, but have broader engraving in the more distal portion than any examples seen below. The terminal blossoms’ engraving is completely unlike the simple 7 wedge marks on the Lattes engraving and the slightly different form of the engraved marks of the ELM piece. The Tewfik Bichay engraving has a longer central engraved line that is stylistically slightly distinct from the others. The number and placement of the gold dot fruits in the wreath are different than all of the other examples illustrated below. The red enamel portion of the wreath bindings are thinner than seen in the first 3 Lattes examples below, and resemble those in the illustration of the 4th Lattes example from an eMedals auction. Also, there are differences in the calligraphic inscription of “Ismail” on the central boss compared with the first 3 Lattes examples below. While slightly different than the calligraphy on the eMedals example, this offering from the Künker auction also has an additional mark near the margin of the central boss in the ~7:00 position, compared to the calligraphy of the first 3 Lattes breast stars shown below. There is some chipping damaged to the highest relief portions of the enamel of this central medallion. The several anomalies in this piece may suggest a chimera of some original components rather than an outright fabricated imitation. This is a moderately high-resolution image of a similarly engraving example of the Order of Ismail breast star. This comes from a flickr image on Hassan Kamal-Kelisi Morali’s flickr site and is identified as measuring 70 mm in diameter, and weighing 81.25 g. The dimension identifies the size as that of a 2nd Class Grand Officer breast star (https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/8843698381). He provides a partial link to the La Galerie Numismatique website (the source of the measurement and weight), however the link no longer works (but see the text for next image below about the LA Galerie Numismatique listing with this image). There also looks to be damage to the enamel of the central medallion’s so that I though it might be the same example, but it appear to have different damage. Additionally, on closer inspection there are other differences between the design elements on the above January 2020 Künker example of a Grand Cordon sized breast star and this Grand Officer Class piece. The central medallion of this image from flickr lacks the addition mark on the inscription “Ismail” near the margin in the 7:00 position seen on the above Künker breast star. There also are differences between the number and placement of the gold dot fruits in the wreath, and in the form of the red-enameled bands binding the wreath compared with the Künker piece. There also appears to be wear to some of the enamel on the leaves in the wreath that is not apparent in the Künker photo. The photo angle seems to be slightly angled from the viewer’s right in the first photo of the Künker example is. The flickr breast star above does looks as though it has a slight offset between the base embellishment and the star, most apparent to the viewer’s right of the superior arm of the gold and enameled star. The camera angle on this image seems to be perpendicular to the breast star. Above is another photo (of moderate resolution) of the same 2nd Class Grand Officer breast star and what is probably the associated neck badge (showing the same style from another image on Hassan Kamal-Kelisi Morali’s flickr photostream (https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/8844318688/). It can be zoomed slightly, but does not provide as clear detail as seen in the flickr image of just the breast star image above. This is also from a La Galerie Numismatique auction listing. Hassan Kamal-Kelisi Morali identifies it as made by Lattes. This also shows the associated neck badge, that exhibits the same style of engraving on the gold floral elements on the gold and enamel arms of the star. This particular image is a very common photo of the Order of Ismail to encounter on internet searches, but I have never before noticed the engraving differences compared with most examples on auction sites. I included this photo as the 6th illustration in my post of 6 December, 2017 for comparison of the design of full-sized pieces ( in hindsight, misguidedly) with a few genuine and unusual miniatures of the Order of Ismail on the “Miniatures of the Middle East & Arab World” thread begun by Owain (oamotme) on 6 December, 2017 in the Middle East & Arab States” section here on GMIC.I also included this same image as the 2nd photo in my post of 13 December, 2018 outlining the 4 classes of the Order of Ismail. While there is a chance that this is a variant form of the Order made by J. Lattes, it is not the best example to characterize the desing of the 2ndClass Grand Officer neck badge and breast star of the Order.I was able to search and found the La Galerie Numismatique auction listings archived on the Liveauctioneers website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/search/?keyword=Order%20of%20Ismail&page=1&pageSize=24&sort=-relevance&status=archive) that include 3 listings for this set (Lot 0185 of 3 March 2013; Lot 0442 of 23 June, 2013; & Lot 0300 of 20 September, 2013). The auction description provides the measurement of the neck badge as 60 mm and its weight as 48.6 g. The breast star is 70 mm in diameter and weighs 81.25 g, and is identified as a Grand Officer set. Two additional photos in each of these listings provide an image of the neck badge and ribbon (showing in better detail the same kind of engraving better than in the image above) and an image of the reverse of both the neck badge and breast star showing the Lattes manufacturer’s marks on each, but is not of high-enough resolution to distinguish any of the 3 Egyptian hallmarks (below the Lattes mark on the neck badge and to the right of the catch of the tunic pin on the breast star). I cannot yet download these photos, but will keep trying. Interestingly, all three lots from March, June, and September were passed and remained un-purchased. Did collectors have doubts about the authenticity of this set? High-resolution image of the obverse of a 2nd Class Grand Officer breast star that I initially encountered on a Pinterest board of (https://www.pinterest.com/offsite/?token=628-525&url=https%3A%2F%2Fi.pinimg.com%2Foriginals%2F61%2F61%2Fd1%2F6161d133bc0d01101e125d81f8dc7e27.png&pin=7881368074139698&client_tracking_params=CwABAAAAEDQzNTc1MzU5NzQxNjkzODUA~0&aux_data=%7B%7D) that I previously included as the 2nd photo in my post of 21 April, 2018. I selected this example because it can be zoomed for comparison with the engraving on the Künker and La Galerie Numismatique examples above. There was no information about the manufacturer or date hallmark on this breast star associated with the Pinterest image of the breast star and neck badge of this set. However, I located the auction listing for this image archived on the acsearch.com website (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=1430371) from a Stack’s Bowers Galleries auction from November of 2012. I posted this image as the 2nd photo in my post of 19 October, 2019 along with the auction information that provided dimensions confirming it is the 2nd Class of the Order of Ismail, that it was made by Lattes, and identifying of the date hallmark as “C” indicating manufacture in 1928-1929 (although no photos of the reverse were provided). Although the engraving is simpler than the more elaborate detailing of the flowers in the January 2020 Künker and La Galerie Numismatique auction examples, the form of the engraving is more elegant in its overall effect. Also note that some of the examples shown below here have slight variation in the number and placement of the gold dots representing fruit, and the red & gold bindings on the wreath framing the central gold & enamel boss with the calligraphic inscription “Ismail”. A high-resolution image of a 2nd Class Grand Officer breast star made by Lattes from an April 2017 auction by Bukowskis, archived on their website (https://www.bukowskis.com/en/lots/906508-the-order-of-ismail-nischan-al-ismail-22k-gold-and-silver-lattes-in-kairo-1928-1929-weight-ca-81-g#). This photo can be zoomed to compare with the Künker and other examples shown here. I previously included this photo as the 1st image in my post of 2 November, 2018 on this thread. The gold fruit dots in the wreath and the red-enamel binding of the wreath match the Pinterest/Stack’s Bowers Galleries example precisely. Although the reverse of this piece is not illustrated in the auction listing, that description identifies the date as 1928-1929. Ah, here again is the very damaged 2nd Class Grand Officer breast badge from La Galerie Numismatique (https://www.coins-la-galerie-numismatique.com/auction-33-day-1/order-ismail) that was awarded to Dr. Giovanni Quirico, physician to King Fuad I. I have previously illustrated other images of this battered example in its case as the 4th photo in my post of 14 November, 2017 (and again as the 2nd -to-last [23rd] photo in my post of 19 October, 2019 in a discussion of variation in cases for the Order of Ismail), the brevet envelope as the 5th photo and the brevet in the 6th photo of that same 14 November post on this thread. I posted this photo as the 14th image in my post of 11 January, 2019 addressing hallmarks. The 16th image in that post shows the “Z” date hallmark on the silver tunic pin of this piece, indicating a date of 1924-1925 (the same as the date hallmarks on the neck badge of this cased set). This can be zoomed for comparison with the other examples in this post, showing damage to the enamel and other elements of the star. I am sorry to illustrate this abused example again, but the high-resolution image also illustrates some interesting differences within Lattes-made examples. Note that the stems of the central 2 flowers exhibit engraving on their stems not seen in the above 2 Lattes examples. Additionally, there is a 5th engraving mark on the central 2 blossom elements that effectively outlines the central petal of the 3 terminal margins of the flower. Neither of these engraving elements are present in any other of the high-resolution images I have seen of the Order of Ismail breast stars made by Lattes (nor by Tewfik Bichay). The most distal flowers on the arms of Dr. Quirico's breast star exhibits only 5 rather than 7 engraving marks. The gold fruits in the wreath and the red-enameled bindings of the wreath are however the same as in the above 2 examples. Because the sample of photos available with reliable dates (photos clearly showing the date hallmarks) is relatively small, I also do not know if the revisions to this Order made in 1922 and 1926 might have affected any aspects of the execution of designs. My suspicion for most of these relatively minor differences shown here among a small number of Lattes examples is that they are likely to represent workshop differences reflecting die replacements and in staff skills more than any intentional re-design. A moderately high resolution image of a 1st Class Grand Cordon breast star made by Lattes from a pre-2016 auction archived on the eMedals website (https://www.emedals.com/order-of-ismail-1915-w01271). This photo can be zoomed, but does not provide the same detail as the above photos. I previously posted this as the 1st image in my initial post of 7 November, 2017, and again as the 1st photo of my post of 13 November, 2017 on this thread. I did not provide any information about this breast star in those posts. However, I included images of the reverse and hallmark data about this breast star in the 28th - 30th image of my post of 11 January 2019. The date hallmarks on this piece are “F”, indicating a manufacturing/assay date of 1931-1932. The engraving on this piece, while following the pattern of the above 3 Lattes designs, appears less gracefully executed, it may be shallower, and has a less flowing calligraphic feel. However, it is more elegant than the workmanship on the Tewfik Bichay example illustrated below. This example shows some differences in the placement and number of gold dot fruits in the wreath compared with the above Lattes examples. The width of the red-enameled bindings of the wreath are thinner than those shown in the Lattes pieces above as well, but those elements are more even in their execution than the thinner windings of the Künker example in the 1st photo above or the Tewfik Bichay example shown below. There are a few differences in the calligraphy of the central inscription of “Ismail”, note especially the additional mark near the margin of the central boss in the ~7:00 position that also appears on the Künker example (and in the Tewfik Bichay example below). This breast star is more recent than the other 3 Lattes examples shown above, and may reflect changes in dies and staff compared with those earlier pieces. High-resolution photo of a 1st Class Grand Cordon set of the Order of Ismail made by Tewfik Bichay. This picture can be zoomed for greater detail. This image is cropped from a photo I illustrated as the only image in my post of 30 April, 2018 on this thread and the uncropped original shows the obverse and reverse of both the sash badge and breast star of this set. This comes from fall 2014 auction by Künker Münzauktionen und Goldhandel (https://www.kuenker.de/en/archiv/stueck/58396). I illustrated a cropped version of that image showing only the reverse of the sash badge and breast star as the 4thto last image in my post of 11 January, 2019 discussing hallmarks. I also included a cropped image of the obverse of the sash badge as the 3rdto last photo in that same post. The Arabic letter date hallmark on the right side of the reverse of the crown suspension device is the most legible, however, even in zoomed views, the date hallmarks shown on the reverse of the pieces are unclear to me. The auction description suggests an Arabic letter hallmark that would indicate 1946-1947. My best inference from viewing the image is that it may indicate an assay date of 1949-1951(?). I cannot read the silver or gold date hallmarks present in the photo of the reverse of this breast star. The auction description states that it is the letter “D” hallmark, indicating an assay date of 1929-1930, and would indicte that this is not an actual set of sash badge and breast star. The gold floral patterns on the arms of the gold & enamel star are less gracefully executed than the Lattes examples. The same is true of the engraving on the gold floral designs on the arms of the star. The placement of the gold dot fruits in the wreath is different than any of the Lattes breast stars shown above (including the eMedals example that is different from the first 3 illustrated Lattes breast stars). The red-enameled bindings of the wreath are thinner than the first 3 Lattes examples, less regular than on the eMedals Lattes breast star, and more closely resemble the workmanship on the January 2020 Künker auction example. The calligraphy on the central boss also has the additional mark (at ~7:00 near the frame of the central medallion) on the calligraphic inscription of “Ismail” as seen on the eMedals Lattes breast star and the January 2020 Künker example. Photo of an ELM version of probably the 1st Class Grand Cordon monarchy-in-exile modern version of the Order of Ismail breast star. This image can be zoomed for some additional detail. The ELM version shows the adherence to the form of engraving seen in every example except the initial Künker and La Galerie Numismatique breast stars. This comes from a former version of the ELM website (https://instarix.com/p/1449052170103257288_4325996166#) but this image is no longer part of their advertisement. I expect several differences in execution on such a modern medal, however it is useful in emphasizing how anomalous engraving on the January 2020 Künker auction example and the set from La Galerie Numismatique shown in the first photos may be. Obviously, the design for this medal adhered to the most common form of that engraving and this may suggest that is the official design and the unusual form on the examples at the top of this post is either a very uncommon variant or a perhaps a rogue impersonation. Although to my eye not as finely executed, I won’t go through all the design distinctions from pre-1952 pieces, it is an inelegant copy of a beautiful award. However, note that the wreath is markedly less 3-D in not having leaves with relief underneath the enamel, the gold dot fruits in the wreath and the bands on the wreath also are flush with the rounded ring that mimics the form of a wreath without the dynamic presentation of that design element, and it lacks the delicate movement implied by the width variation in portions of the floral design’s tendril or leaf components. The finials at the ends of each arm of the gold star obviously have a more robust gold casting with a smaller amount of enamel (almost certainly more durable than the original design and construction by Lattes and his successors). Images provided on the January 2020 auction listing showing the hallmarks on the reverse of the Künker example. Again, I may be reading more into the form of the “LATTES” maker’s mark because of the odd engraving on this piece, however the first 4 letters appear to possibly be more regular than most I have seen, especially in comparison with the last 2 letters. The “…ES” show irregularity in their form comparable to seen in many of these marks. However, the “LATT…” letters do not (the crosses onto "T"s look like separate elements rather than as integrated components of even a slightly worn punch). Perhaps it is my paranoia, but in comparison with the last 2 images of Lattes maker's hallmarks below, the "...ES" appear more sculpted so as to appear worn than actually showing some of the irregularity. Certainly some of the Lattes marks have crisp letters (see the reverse of the 4th Class knight badge shown below), however the combination of some letters that look to have a “worn” form and those that are sharp merits additional scrutiny. Punches that are used for multiple marking of jewelry pieces in a workshop often develop irregularities, and detection of unusually regular letters, or inconsistent wear across the entire set, in makers’ names is a common way to identify suspect imitations. There are no apparent anomalies in the 3 silver hallmarks shown on the right. Again, this Künker breast star may be a bonified, but very uncommon, variation in the Lattes-designed Order of Ismail regalia. However, why then are there only 2 examples that I have found so far circulating in the auction world that can be sampled through online listings? Why did the 2nd Class Grand Officer set I illustrated above from La Galerie Numismatique remain unsold over 3 listings? Why do Tewfik Bichay and the ELM examples all employ a form of the engraving on these floral design elements that is consistent with the other Lattes pieces I illustrated in the 4th - 7th photos shown above? If there is monkey business about the construction of this piece, I feel that the facetted and rayed silver embellishment is authentic and the date hallmark in the January 2020 Künker would indicate the work of Maison Lattes. The anomalies in the obverse design elements of this piece (and the La Galerie Numismatique set of Grand Officer regalia) compared to other Lattes examples are hard to reconcile. If not the work of Lattes, I would suspect the central medallion portions to be later components made by Tewfik Bichay, Fahmy Tewfik Bichay, or another manufacturer that I have never seen. If the “LATTES” hallmark on the reverse boss of the January 2020 Künker piece is not genuine, it would suggest trying to manufacture a mark consistent with the date hallmark on the rayed & facetted embellishment and potentially represent an older version of such a breast star (of course, an isolated authentic Lattes reverse boss to the central medallion could also have been combined in this way). There is something seriously hinky about the obverse gold and enamel star arms that leads me to suspect a chimeral creation mimicking a valuable 1923-1924 Grand Cordon breast star. In this case. The presence of 2 such examples seems insufficient to postulate good evidence for a variant in the Order of Ismail design of the engraving by Lattes. But the scarce appearance of 2 pieces with this anomalous engraving may suggest efforts by a workshop to combine some genuine but not valuable bits & pieces into saleable items. It may be ironic, that internet borrowing has selected the 3rd photo of the Grand Officer set as one of the most commonly duplicated examples used to illustrate the design of the Order of Ismail. Reverse of a 4th Class Knight chest badge of the Order of Ismail showing the Lattes mark with even and crisp letters. What is different about this compared with the mark on the January 2020 Künker example is that all the letters are of similar definition, suggesting a relatively new punch. This comes from an October 2017 eMedals auction (https://www.emedals.com/egypt-a-french-made-order-of-ismail-officer-by-lattes). I illustrated an un-cropped version of this photo as the 21st photo in my post of 11 January, 2018 on this thread. Lattes maker’s hallmark on the reverse of the same 2ndClass Grand Officer Order of Ismail breast star as shown above from the April 2017 Bukowskis auction (https://www.bukowskis.com/en/lots/906508-the-order-of-ismail-nischan-al-ismail-22k-gold-and-silver-lattes-in-kairo-1928-1929-weight-ca-81-g#). Note that all the letters exhibit similar size and possible deformation from use of the punch. I have confined myself here to a couple examples of consistent wear across LATTES marks on the silver reverse of pieces relevant to the January 2020 Künker mark. However, several illustrations I have included on this thread of the gold Lattes marks on sash badges (1st Class) and neck badges (2nd & 3rd Classes) also illustrate the more common association of consistent letter morphology across al letters in the mark. I have avoided including some of those gold hallmarks here because 18 carat gold is softer than 900 silver and may respond slightly differently to marking and wear of the maker’s punch. Lattes maker's hallmark on 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail from a December, 2015 auction by Thies Auction that is archived on the invaluable.com website (https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/egypt-order-of-ismail-knight-s-badge-269-c-2744c6ab2c). I just recently posted this image as the 2nd photo on my post of 15 January, 2020 here on this thread. This also shows the more comparably similar size and imperfections in the punched mark. Also of interest, the "...ES" appear very similar to those on the January 2020 Künker Lattes mark; however, the irregularity of the "E" in this example is opposite to the appearance of that letter on the Künker piece. I may be imagining this, after all both "E' and "S" are often difficult letters to create and often show irregularities on a range of jewelers' hallmarks.
  7. I have identified an individual who is wearing the Order of Ismail in a photo I included in my post of 2 April, 2019 on this thread. That post showed some of King Farouk I's chamberlains wearing chamberlain's pins in response to illustrations that Owain provided of such pins in his posts here of 26 March and 29 March, 2019; 2 photos of named individuals wearing the Order of Ismail; a couple low-resolution images of King Farouk I's Order of Ismail from theAlexandria National Museum; and the image duplicated below of an individual I could not identify at the time I posted this photo. Above is the final image (11th) in my post of 2 April, 2019 showing the man seated 3rd to the viewer's left of King Farouk I wearing the Order of Ismail (the sash is probably that of the Grand Cordon Class of this award). This shows a royal banquet honoring Crown Prince Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran (the wedding banquet?) seated to the viewer's left of King Farouk I, probably in 1939. Unfortunately I cannot read Arabic and had no volunteers to translate the captions. I have now been able to identify this recipient of the Order of Ismail. The woman seated to the viewers right of the Crown Prince of Iran is Lady Lampson, the 2nd wife of the British Ambassador to Egypt, Sir Miles Lampson, from 1934-1946. Next to Lady Lampson on the viewer's left is the Iranian Ambassador to Egypt from 1939-1943, HE Ali Akbar Bahman wearing the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail. This image came from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43829903@N02/4047823450/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/ Above is another photo from this same banquet that is posted on flickr in a photostream of Ahmed S. Kamel (https://www.flickr.com/photos/askamel/400176241/in/photostream/). On Ahmed S. Kamel's flickr, this image is identified as copyrighted by askamel (and the same image also is on a flickr photostream of Almorgh that is identified as copyrighted by almorgh: https://www.flickr.com/photos/8168043@N03/807345293/in/dateposted/). The Ahmed S. Kamel version of this image identifies Lady Lampson by name, but only identifies the man next to her as "HE the Iranian Ambassador". This made it straightforward to check a list of ambassadors to Egypt and identify him as Ali Akbar Bahman (also known as Mizra Ali Akbar Khan) who was the Ambassador to Egypt from 1939-1943, and confirm that with other photos of Bahman. This photo does not show the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail breast star in as good detail as the previous image above (that can be zoomed). As noted above, the images probably dates to March 1939 when Princess Fawzia (sister of King Farouk I) married the Crown Prince of Iran. The marriage is considered to have been a political union conceived by Reza Shah of Iran to legitimize his non-royal origins. King Farouk I was apparently convinced by his advisor Aly Maher Pasha to approve of the match to benefit Egypt's power in the Middle East against Britain. Ali Akbar Bahman arranged the marriage. The 1939 date of these photos indicate that Bahman was awarded the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail probably very early in his appointment as Ambassador to Egypt. The presence of Ali Akbar Bahman suggests these photos are from the elaborate wedding banquet sponsored by King Farouk I at Abdeen Palace. Ahmed S. Kamel's notes on this photo also identify that King Farouk I wears the breast star of the Iranian Order of Pahlavi and the Iranian Crown Prince wears the Grand Cordon breast star of the Order of Mohammed Ali. A photo of Alii Akbar Bahman (second from the left, wearing glasses) at the 1943 Cairo Convention (November 22-26) that Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Chiang Kai-Shek attended with their diplomatic corps to strategize post WW II treatment of Japan and power relations in Asia (including Russia's role, although Stalin and his staff did not attend this conference). Bahman may be wearing the sash and breast badge of the Order of Ismail in this photo, although the breast badge is barely visible. (From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Akbar_Bahman#/media/File:Ali_Akbar_Bahman_with_delegation.JPG). Another photo associated with Iranian Crown Prince Mohammad Reza Pahlavi coming to Egypt in March, 1939 for his marriage to Princess Fawzia of Egypt. This photo is from the same flickr photostrem of Ahmed S. Kamel and also is copyrighted by him on flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/askamel/400176235/in/dateposted/). It shows the Iranian Crown Prince on the left saluting as the Imperial Iranian Anthem is played on the Egyptian Royal Yacht H.M.S. Mahroussa (see my post of 30 April, 2019 on this thread that briefly discusses the H.M.S. Mahroussa in relation to identifying the portrait of Rear Admiral Galal Eddin Allouba Bey , who was the commander of the H.M.S. Mahroussa, wearing the 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail in that portrait). This image is of interest here as the man behind the Crown Prince appears to be wearing the neck badge of the 3rd Class Commander Order of Ismail. I have not yet identified this individual.
  8. I have a couple odds & ends to add - illustrations of one additional 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail and a good resolution image of a Tewfik Bichay interior case lid marking from an Order of the Nile. Obverse of a 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail from a December, 2015 auction, Lot 269, by Thies Auction that is archived on the invaluable.com website (https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/egypt-order-of-ismail-knight-s-badge-269-c-2744c6ab2c). No measurements or other data are provided in the auction description. The Lattes hallmark on the reverse of this 4th Class Order of Ismail from the 2015 Thies auction. The hallmarks on this same 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail showing (L-R): the Cairo assay office hallmark for 18 carat gold; the ibis hallmark identifying Egyptian-made gold; and the date hallmark "D" indicating the manufacture and/or assay date as 1929-1930. Tewfik Bichay manufacturer's mark printed inside the lid of a 3rd Class Order of the Nile from a 27 February, 2016 auction of Centurion Auctions, Lot 15138, archived on the Liveauctioneers website. (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/43639112_egypt-order-of-the-nile-badge-with-sash-and-box). This cased Order of the Nile is mistakenly described as having a sash, rather than the neck ribbon. No date or assay hallmarks are visible in the 2 images of the reverse of the Order of the Nile neck badge in this case, but the Tewfik Bichay hallmark is visible on the reverse of the central boss of the badge. This is a good quality image of this interior printed case label (It can be zoomed). It is comparable to that shown in the 2nd photo of Owain's post of 5 April, 2018 on this thread of his cased example of a 3rd Class Commander neck badge of the Order of Ismail; to the 4th phot of my post of 17 September, 2019 of the 1st Class Grand Cordon Order of Ismail awarded to Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1947; and to a blue ink version of this mark with a blue-line frame in a case that I illustrated as the 6th to last photo (20th image ) in my post of 21 October, 2019 of the case for an Egyptian 3rd Class, Devotion to Duty medal in bronze from an eBay auction. The royal cipher on the exterior lid of this case is that of King Farouk I.
  9. Below are four higher resolution images of a Grand Cordon set of the Order of Ismail from an April 2018 auction, SKU 560, by La Galerie Numismatique (https://www.coins-la-galerie-numismatique.com/auction-xxxviii-day-1/order-ismail) that also are archived on the liveauctioneers.com website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/60483636_order-of-ismail). I previously illustrated this set in the 1st-3rd photos and the 8th photo of my post of 22 February, 2019 in a continued discussion of hallmarks and their placement on the Order of Ismail. I also illustrated this first Class Order of Ismail in its case in the last photo (24th image in that post) of my post of 19 October, 2019 discussing cases of the Order of Ismail. Those images all came from the liveauctioneers.com website, and I only recently was able to download these higher-resolution images from the La Galerie Numismatique website. These are slightly more detailed images than photos in the 22 February post. The description in the La Galerie Numismatique auction listing is the same as that for the liveauctioneers description. This set was made by Lattes and the sash badge measurement is given as 62 mm wide x 85 mm high, the breast star is stated to measure 82 mm in diameter. I originally illustrated this cased set to show that the sash badge and breast star had overlapping but slightly contrasting date hallmarks. The sash badge is hallmarked with "B" date hallmarks indicating a manufacturing/assay date of 1927-1928. The breast star is hallmarked "C" for manufacture/assay in 1928-1929. Apparently, the Cairo assay office either received each component at slightly different times, or the staff performed the assays of each under adjacent temporal periods when the date hallmark was being changed so that each piece in the cased set bears a different date hallmark. Another reason I wanted to illustrate this set again is that it appears to show a variant form of the decorative bow of the sash that does not have the pinking (zig-zag) edge as shown in the illustrations of most other examples of the Grand Cordon sash of the Order of Ismail. As noted in my post of 15 October, 2019, the Eisenhower 1st Class Order of Ismail sash bow lacks pinking of the bow (shown in the 1st photo of my post of 17 September, 2019 and in the 1st and 2nd photos of my post of 17 September). The decorative bow also may have a slightly different tied configuration that I do not know if it is principally an artifact of more recent re-tying or folding of the sash or some other form of the intended bow configuration. The ends of the sash of this example are frayed and do not exhibit the pinking edge, but that may just have been cause by wear. Higher resolution image of this Grand Cordon Class of he Order of Ismail from the April 2018 auction by La Galerie Numismatique in its case. This is a better detailed image than the versions I previously illustrated in the 1st photo of my post of 22 February, 2019 and in the last photo of my post of 19 October, 2019. (this image, and the three photos below, are from: https://www.coins-la-galerie-numismatique.com/auction-xxxviii-day-1/order-ismail) Higher resolution image of this La Galerie Numismatique Grand Cordon Order of Ismail than the version I posted in the 2nd photo of my post of 22 February, 2019, showing the lack of pinking on the decorative sash bow. It also illustrates the frayed margins of the sash that lack pinking. While some sashes for other Egyptian Orders also exhibit a lack of pinking of the bow and sash margins (see the 1st illustration that 922f included in his post of 22 April, 2018 on this thread showing one of Fuad II's Monarchy in Exile example of the Nishan al Noor; also see the Monarchy in Exile examples of sashes for the Order of Women and the Order of Mohammed Ali made by Worth in Markus post of 28 November, 2018 in his thread "Interesting Egyptian orders in Spink Auction" in the Middle East & Arab States section here on GMIC). However, such a configuarion is unusual compared with most examples of the Grand Cordon sash of the Order of Ismail. Higher resolution photo of the sash badge from the La Galerie Numismatique April 2018 auction than I posted in the 3rd photo of my post of 22 February, 2019. The auction description states this badge is 62 mm wide x 85 mm high, and date hallmarked "B" = an assay date date of 1927-1928. The identified height of 85 mm seems too large, most reported height dimensions for the sash badge range from 80-82 mm, but I cannot be certain where on the Crown suspension device that dimensions was measured (or if it may have included the clip to the sash?). Higher resolution photo of the breast star from the La Galerie Numismatique April 2018 auction than the version I posted in the 8th photo of my post of 22 February, 2019. The auction description identifies the diameter of this star as 82 mm. Although most reported examples are consistently 80 mm in diameter, some 1st Class stars are identified as ranging 81-82 mm. Images of the reverse of this breast star show a "C" date hallmark for manufacture or assay in 1928-1929. I am including a few additional images below (most I have previously posted on this thread) showing configurations of the bow on the Grand Cordon sash of the Order of Ismail. Unfortunately, there are not a lot of good mages of the sash bow on auction sites nor in some of the few photos I have found of individuals wearing the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail. Image of a Grand Cordon Class Order of Ismail sash and sash badge (there is no breast star associated with this example) from a past eMedals auction. This example was made by Lattes. The sash badge is identified as measuring 61.5 mm wide x 80 mm tall, including the crown suspension device. The sash badge has a date hallmark of "A" indicating manufacture in 1925-1926. I previously posted this image as the photo in my post of 13 November, 2017. This example shows the pinking of the central 2 bow margins of the decorative bow (and the outermost/lowermost portion of the bow is hemmed, not pinked). The sash margins also have pinking of the fabric ends. No length or width dimensions of this sash are give in the actuation description. (From: https://www.emedals.com/africa/egypt/egypt-order-of-ismail-w0269) Image of another sash for the Gand Cordon Class of the Order of Ismail from a past eMedals auction. This sash is not associated with any sash badge or breast star, but the suspension swivel clip device is present). Although slightly crushed from storage, this photo clearly shows the 2 central portions of the decorative bow exhibiting pinking above the lowermost single bow that is hemmed. This configuration also is seen in the above eMedals Grand Cordon sash, and in the next image below from a 2017 Spink & Son auction. The width of this sash is identified as 112 mm, its length is not given, although it is stated to be "full length". I previously illustrated the sash suspension swivel clip device of this example in the 6th photo of my post of 22 August, 2019. (From: https://www.emedals.com/order-of-ismail-1915-a-sash-w01278) A Grand Cordon Class Order of Ismail from a December, 2017 auction by Spink & Son, Auction 17003, Lot 28, (https://www.spink.com/lot/17003000028) archived on The Salesroom website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-us/auction-catalogues/spink/catalogue-id-srspi10156/lot-3b07acb4-542f-4733-93a3-a83200b99892). This example was made by Lattes and the auction description identifies the sash badge as 62 mm wide x 80 mm tall (Including the crown suspension device) and the breast star as 80 mm in diameter. This example has a date hall mark of "Y" (manufactured in 1923-1924) and was associated with its case. I previously posted this image as the only photo in my post of 6 December, 2017 on this thread, and as the 1st photo of my post of 13 December, 2018. This is probably the best auction image of the decorative bow showing the pinked margins of the uppermost 2 portions of the bow underlain by the 2 bows with hemmed margins (and the pinking of the sash end). The Eisenhower Grand Cordon sash showing the lack of any pinking of the decorative bow, although the margin of the sash shows pinking of its edge. Photo provided by the Archvist at the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum & Childhood Home, Abilene, Kansas, USA (https://www.eisenhowerlibrary.gov/eisenhowers/awards-medals). I included this photo as the 1st image in my post of 17 November, 2019 on this thread. The date hallmark probably identifies the manufacturing date as 1945-1946 for this example made by Tewfik Bichay (the award date to Eisenhower is 1947). The JOMSA article on the Order of Ismail (2006. Journal of the Orders and Medals Society of America (JOMSA) 54 (4): Fig 15, pg. 20) appears to show a decorative bow that lacks pinking, however the image of the bow itself is incomplete. The JOMSA description gives the width of the sash as 100 mm, and the 9 mm red stripe are inset from each edge of the sash by 2 mm. No length of the sash is identified. I included this illustration in my post of 27 August, 2019. The portrait of Sir John Loader Maffey wearing the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail with his uniform as Governor-General of the Sudan that I included as the 6th photo in my post of 25 November, 2019. This is the only image I have currently found showing someone wearing the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail that shows the decorative bow of the sash. The National portrait Gallery version of this image (https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw114845/John-Loader-Maffey-1st-Baron-Rugby) can be zoomed and appears to show pinking of the 2 uppermost margins of the decorative bow and the hemmed lowermost bow portion, as seen in several photos above. Unfortunately, the resolution of this version of the portrait (from: http://royalisticism.blogspot.com/2015_12_23_archive.html) is not high enough to see the pinking on the margins of the decorative bow. This photo was taken on 27 June 1931, and is a whole plate glass negative, curated in the National Portrait Gallery (NPG x150079).
  10. The Archivist at the Sudan Archive at Durham University just got back to me about the unlikely date of 1930 for Sir Geoffrey Francis Archer's award receipt of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Ismail. Apparently the catalogue entry was incorrect, identifying the Hijra date as 25 Shawwal 1348 as the award date of the award to Archer (26 March, 1930). The correct date on the brevet for Archer's Order of Ismail is 6 Shawwal 1344 AH, which is 20 April, 1926. This dates fits within Sir Geoffrey Archer's time as Governor General of the Sudan (he was forced to resign on 6 July, 1926). The Archivist step that the date is unclearly printed on the brevet, and he will double check in February with a group of Arabists.
  11. 922F, Many thanks for identifying this breast star and for providing the links with information about this award. Where would I be without the education you keep providing through significant information related to my stumbling along in the dark about the Order of Ismail and my feeble forays into identifying other decorations? I have passed your identification along to the Archivist at the Durham Univ. Sudan Archive as well. We'll see if the Archivist can clarify the possibility of an earlier date for Sir Geoffrey Francis Archer's Order of Ismail that makes a bit more sense in terms of the potential date for the portrait of him wearing the Grand Cordon sash with badge and breast star. In the meantime, to veer back into the Order of Ismail lane (albeit a low velocity philatelic rather than purely phaleristic one), below are a few Egyptian stamps that use one of the best known official photographic portraits of King Farouk I showing him wearing the Order of Ismail. I posted a version of this portrait as the 3rd image of my post of 24 March, 2019 on this thread (and accidentally inserted it a second time at the end of the post). In that portrait King Farouk I wears the Collar of the Order of Mohammed Ali along with the Sash and breast star of the Order, The breast star of the Order of Ismail, and the breast star of the Order of the Nile, all worn in correct order of precedence. Although the portrait has sometimes been identified as c 1948 (and I repeated this in my post of 24 March. 2019) it is used in several stamps below that were issued before that date. This s a sheet of imperforate 4 mills King Farouk I stamps in green ink from David Feldman International Auctioneers (https://dsy73arn0qite.cloudfront.net/2019/05/159770ex1_full.jpg). The King's portrait has been cropped so that it only displays a small portion of the Order of Ismail breast star to the viewer's left of the Order of Mohammed Ali. 1944-51 military King Farouk I £E blue and sepia ink stamp with the breasts stars of the Order of Mohammed Ali, the Order of Ismail, and the Order of the Nile visible (as are the other stamps and one FDI envelope illustrated below). These may be a valuable imperforate set. This is from David Feldman Auctioneers (https://www.davidfeldman.com/de/dfsa-auktionen/egypt-2017-online-auction/global-catalogue/80120/egypt-definitives-1936-1952-king-farouk-1944-51-mi/?soff_session_category=6410). This is the 25th Birthday of King Farouk I stamp in purple ink issued in 1945 celebrating the King's 25th birthday (11 February, 1920). This is a valuable imperforate example set of this 10 mills stamp. (From: https://findyourstampsvalue.com/rarest-stamps/most-valuable-egyptian-stamps). 50 pi military stamp of King Faoruk I issued in 1944-51 in green and sepia ink. It shows a much greater amount of the King Farouk I portrait. Note the King's crescent and 3 stars from his coat-of-arms surmounted by the crown at the superior margin of the stamp. This is considered to be one of the most handsome Farouk I stamps by collectors, and this imperforate examples is quite valuable. From: https://findyourstampsvalue.com/rarest-stamps/most-valuable-egyptian-stamps This 30 mills stamp is identified as having been issued on February 11, 1952 (the King's birthday) in green and sepia as part of a series commemorating the abrogation of the Anglo-Egyptian treaty, before King Farouk I was overthrown on 26 July, 1952. From the cornet.com website (https://colnect.com/en/stamps/stamp/321721-King_Farouk_and_Flag-Abrogation_of_the_Anglo-Egyptian_treaty-Egypt). Commemorative first day of issue envelope (10 January, 1946) for the royal visit of King Adulaziz Ibn Saud of Arabia to Egypt. I illustrated a photo of this event (with the associated date of 11 January, 1946) showing both King Farouk I and Ahmed Hassanein wearing the 1st Class Order of Ismail as the 6th photo of my post of 24 March, 2019 on this thread. From an August 2019 eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/1946-Cairo-Egypt-The-Royal-Visit-King-of-Saudi-Arabia-First-Day-of-Issue-Cover/392384361280?hash=item5b5bee3340:g:4dgAAOSwPqFdVeqH). There are several other Egyptian stamps that feature versions of this portrait. Many are cropped and do not show the Order of Ismail. There are some additional stamps that repeat the cropped versions seen in the 4 mill green stamp shown above (i.e., a 1 mill orange/brown ink 1945 issue; a 2 mills red ink 1948 issue; a 10 mills purple ink 1944 issue; a 13 mils red ink January 17, 1952 issue; a 10 mills military Gaza stamp in green ink). I have illustrated above the best quality examples I can readily find online, and those my uninformed philatelic tastes consider interesting uses of this King Farouk I portrait with the Order of Ismail.
  12. Jah Jim, I've included the other portrait of Sir George Stewart Symes from the Durham University Sudan Archive that you wished to look at to perform some "fuzzy logic" medal identification. At second glance, I am very uncertain whether the breast star to the viewer's right of the neck badge of the 3rd Class Order of the Nile may be an Ethiopian Order of the Star. I expected to see some of the openwork of the execution if it is an Order of the Star. My guess was based on the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Vol 53, pg. 585) listing that Symes’ foreign honors include Hedjazi and Ethiopian decorations, in addition to the identified Turkish award (the 4th Class Order of Osmanieh) and Egyptian awards (the 1st Class Order of Ismail and the 3rd Class Order of the Nile). I look forward to your opinion on this breast star. Autographed portrait photo of Lieutenant-Colonel Sir George Stewart Symes in his uniform as Governor-General of the Sudan with a slightly contrasting set of decorations from the portraits shown in the last 2 images of my recent post of 25 November. This photo is dated to approximately 1939, although that is not a secure date association. The portrait is identified as having been taken in London. This photo is from the Palace Green Library Special Collections, Durham University Library’s Sudan Collection (GB-0033 SAD.1/11/5) in materials of the Symes, G. S. Collection, and is copyrighted by the archive and should be used for research purposes only.
  13. One of the most illustrious Europeans to be awarded the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Ismail is the Norwegian jurist Michael Hansson (1875-1944). Unfortunately, I have not found any photographs of him wearing this award, nor any documentation regarding where this award currently resides. Hansson had a 25-year career on the Egyptian Mixed Courts and then worked with the Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague as well as other international arbitration commissions. Hansson received the1938 Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the Nansen International Office for Refugees and presented the acceptance speech for the1938 Nobel Prize as the President of that organization from 1936-1938 (https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/1938/nansen/lecture/). Michael Hansson was appointed in 1907 to the District Court of Mansourah, transferred to the District Court of Alexandria in 1913, promoted to Conseiller (legal advisor) of the Mixed Court of Appeals in 1915, made vice-President of the Mixed Court of Appeals in 1924, and served as the President of the Court of Appeals from 1927 until his retirement from the Mixed Courts in 1931. I have posted 4 images of Hansson in his judicial regalia in the 6th-9th photos of my post on 18 April, 2019 that discusses the biographies of judges whose badges or photos of them in their regalia are useful in my research on the badges worn by the judges and some other officials of the Mixed Courts (see the thread “Egypt Khedival Judges’ Badge question” that I started on 17 November, 2016 here in the “Middle East & Arab States” section of the GMIC Forum). Hansson was a very well-respected jurist, and his promotion to the most prestigious position in the Egyptian Mixed Courts (President of the Appeals Court) is evidence of the esteem in which he was held by his peers. Hansson also was awarded the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of the Nile, but I do not know the date of that award. I do not have any photographs of Hansson wearing his Order of Ismail, and do not know the precise date of the award. Hansson had probably not yet received the Order of Ismail or Order of the Nile by 1926. His biography in the 50th Anniversary publication celebrating the Mixed Courts (Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le :journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, on page v of the appendix listing the personnel of the Appeals Court) makes no mention of these honors. Jasper Yeates Brinton wrote in his memoir of his time serving on the Mixed Courts (and eventually as the President of the Appeals Court from 1943-1948) that honors from the Egyptian throne to judges of the Court often were not awarded until after their retirement, to avoid any appearance of biased influence during their term on the bench (pg 87 of Brinton, Jasper Yeates, The Mixed Courts of Egypt, 1930. Yale University Press, New Haven). This practice may not have been entirely exclusive of some individuals receiving ranks and honors from the Egyptian King, however it does appear to be so in relation to Hansson’s receipt of the Grand Cordon of the Order of Ismail. Hansson had a sterling reputation both for his legal acumen and professional behavior that is consistent with not accepting any distinctions from the Egyptian Government while serving on the courts. I can find no evidence that he received his Order of Ismail honor prior to 1931. Hansson also received the Norwegian Knight 1st Class of the Order of St. Olav in 1915, and the 2nd Class Commander of this Order in 1926, and was a Commander of the Swedish Order of the Polar Star (date unspecified). Photograph of Michael Hansson taken in 1912 showing him in his judicial regalia (stamboulin coat with a red sash with the gold & silver judicial badge of a District Court, and maroon tarbush) at the time he served on the District Court of Mansourah. I posted this image as the 6th photo in my post of 18 April, 2019 on the GMIC thread addressing research on the judicial badge of the Mixed Courts, referenced above. This photo is from the Norwegian biographical website Norske Biografisk Leksikon of the Store Norske Leksikon (https://nbl.snl.no/Michael_Hansson) and is the 2nd photographic plate in Hansson's posthumous autobiography: Hansson, Michael, 1946. 25 År I Egypt (25 Years in Egypt), Forlagt Av H. Aschehoug & Co., Oslo, opposite page 17. Photo of Michael Hansson (L) accepting the 1938 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo on behalf of the Nansen International Office for Refugees from Frederik Stang (R), Chairman of the Nobel Committee on December 10, 1938. Captions of this photo do not unambiguously identify which man is Hansson. Although both men look similar in this photo, other photos of each man show that Stang parted his hair on the left and Hansson parted his hair on the right. Additionally, the photo is supposed to document Hansson receiving the award for the Nansen International Office for Refugees, so I believe I have correctly identified their positions in this photo. (From: https://evian1938.de/en/norway/?a=2&d=0&o=0)
  14. I have some doubts about the alleged award date of 1930 for the Archer Grand Cordon Order of Ismail noted above. Although the Palace Green Library Special Collections in the Durham University Library’s Sudan Collection. (GB-0033 SAD. 430/7/6) identifies the award date as 26 March, 1930 in the “Catalogue of the Papers of G. F. Archer”, I think this date is problematic. Archer resigned under duress in 1926. The above portrait of Archer from the Sudan collection (GB-0033 SAD. 1/11/4) is used as the first plate of Archer's autobiography Personal and Historical Memoirs of an East African Administrator, 1963, Oliver & Boyd, Ltd. Edinburgh. Archer titled the image “The Author as Governor-General of the Sudan”. As Archer was forced to resign in 1926, this raised question about the date associated with the brevet for his Order of Ismail as 26 March, 1930. It is certainly conceivable that King Fuad I may have awarded Archer the Order of Ismail after his term as Governor-General. However, it seems unlikely that Archer would pose in the official uniform of Governor-General 4 year after his resignation (and despite the acrimonious attitudes of many British administrators about Archer’s meeting with Sayyid Abd el-Rahman al Mahdi that precipitated his resignation, although historically his position about al-Mahdi proved to be prescient). I believe there is a good chance that the 1930 date in the catalogued information for the brevet may be incorrect. Archer’s forced resignation was considered a disgrace, and I would be surprised if he could have posed for this portrait, and titled it “The Author as Governor-General of the Sudan” in his autobiography, wearing his uniform and this award after that unpleasant event. I am corresponding with the Archivist of the Sudan Collection to see if this question can be resolved. I also wish to add the above image of another example of the 'Mon J. LATTES, Le Caire" label inside a medal case that is identical to that shown in the 2nd photo of my first post of 21 October, 2019 on this thread (although the above image is much higher resolution than that shown on 21 October) from a past eBay auction archived on the Worthpoint.com website for a 2nd Class Silver Egyptian Devotion to Duty medal. The above interior case lid is illustrated in an October 2019 auction listing (Lot 855) on the Saleroom website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/arthur-johnson-and-sons-auctioneers/catalogue-id-ibart10723/lot-f891320e-5a2e-40be-b3f5-aada00f02ed1) for a 2nd Class silver Egyptian Medal for Meritorious Action. The auction description does not identify the medal, but shows illustrations of the obverse, reverse (both showing a purple ribbon), an illusion of the interior case lid (cropped in the above photo), and the exterior of the case showing the cipher of King Fuad I. Other than dating prior to 1936, there is no additional information to try and situate the temporal use of this form of Lattes' interior case marking. The other similar J. Lattes marking shown in my post of 21 October is not associated with any reliable dating information.
  15. I have a few diverse contributions in this post, principally identifying some advertisements for manufacturers of the Mixed Courts' judicial badges. I want to begin with another portrait of Judge Pierre Crabitès during his tenure on the Cairo District Courts. I have finally come up with an additional mention of Laurencin & Cie. who is identified as the manufacturer of one judicial badge shown in a November 2012 auction by La Galerie Numismatique (Lot 323) that is archived on the sixbid.com website (I illustrated this badge in 3rd-to-last image in my post of 28 February, 2019 on this thread). I have found no other information about Laurencin other than this auction mention until I came across the advertising for a well known Cairo Jeweler, L. Kramer, identifying Laurencin & Cie. as an agent of his business. I do not know if this means that the Laurencin & Cie. badge identified in the 2012 La Galerie Numismatique auction may have been made by L. Kramer or by Laurencin. A portrait of Judge Pierre Crabitès from 1930 or earlier used in a plate showing three American judges of the Egyptian Mixed Courts from: Brinton, Jasper Yeates, 1930. The Mixed Courts of Egypt. Yale University Press, New Haven, opposite page 300. An advertisement for Rudolf Stobbe from The Sphinx Vol 13, No. 189, 20 January, 1906, (Societe Orientale de Publicite), page 33 (from the American University of Cairo digital Collections: http://digitalcollections.aucegypt.edu/cdm/ref/collection/sphinx/id/620/). Compare this advertisement with the 3 that I included as the 3rd, 4th, and 5th images of my post of 24 September, 2019 on this thread. Advertisement for the well-known Cairo jeweler L. Kramer that identifies Laurencin & Co. as an agent of this jeweler in Alexandria. Laurencin & Cie. is identified as having a shop on rue Chèrif Pacha, Alexandria, the same street where two other manufacturers of Mixed Court judicial badges had their shops (W. Horowitz and Zivy Frères & Cie.). L. Kramer is one of the most commonly identified jewelers of Cairo from advertising and guide book listings from the late 19th-early 20th century. This advertisement is from: The Sphinx, Vol 26, No. 422, 29 March, 1919, (Societe Orientale de Publicite), page 3 (from the American University of Cairo digital Collections: http://digitalcollections.aucegypt.edu/cdm/ref/collection/sphinx/id/3763/). I have found only one Mixed Court magistrate's badge that is identified as having been "made" by Laurencin & Cie., from a November 2012 auction by La Galerie Numismatique (Lot 323) that is archived on the sixbid.com website (https://www.sixbid.com/browse.html?auction=515&category=11656&lot=539484). The auction listing identifies the cased badge as being in a case marked “M. Laurencin & Cie, Alexandrie, Egypte”. No photographs are included to determine whether other maker's marks are present of the reverse of the badge nor of the Laurencin & Cie. name in the case for this badge. I included the one photograph from this auction listing as the 3rd-to-last image in my post of 28 February, 2019 on this thread, in a discussion of hallmarks and the different manufacturers identified for these Mixed Court badges. An advertisement for L. Kramer on the same page as the above advertisement for L. Kramer as a watchmaker, from The Sphinx, Vol 26, No. 422, 29 March, 1919, (Societe Orientale de Publicite), page 3 (from the American University of Cairo digital Collections: http://digitalcollections.aucegypt.edu/cdm/ref/collection/sphinx/id/3763/). As noted above, advertisements for the L. Kramer workshop are among the most commonly seen in a range of late 19th - early 20th century online documents about Egypt. It is unclear if Adolphe L. Kramer (see below) is another family member of the Maison Kramer business, but that is also a well recognized name in Cario and Palestine as a jewelry and watch business. In this advertisement, L. Kramer's business is identified in the Muski market region on the same street, el-Manakh Street, where the J. Lattes business was located at address of J. Lattes shop as "Sharia el-Manâkh 30" (see my post of 24 April, 2019 on the thread "Question about the Order of Ismail/Nishan al-Ismail" in the section here on "Middle East & Arab States"). Below are 7 advertisements for L. Kramer spanning 1898-1928. All are from the the www.925-1000.com website, in the the Middle East Trade section (http://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=53896&p=170910&hilit=kramer). Advertisement for L. Kramer from 1898 with an address at Mousky and Shawadliyah Streets in Cairo. Advertisement for L. Kramer from 1899. Advertisement for L. Kramer from 1904, giving the address as rue Mousky, Cairo. Advertisement for L. Kramer from 1918 with the shop identified in the Muski at the intersection of Mousky Street and El-Manakh Street, Cairo. Advertisement for L. Kramer from 1923 with shops in Cario, Alexandria, Jerusalem, Jaffa, and Haifa. . Advertisement for L. Kramer from 1928 identifying shops in Cairo, Alexandria, Jaffe, Jerusalem, and Haifa. Advertisement for L. Kramer as a representative of the Parisian jeweler A. Marchak from 1928, located at 4 rue de la Paix 4 in Cairo with a shop in Alexandria as well. Example of an L. Kramer manufacturer's hallmark on a cigarette case with assay hallmarks that are not Egyptian (From: http://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=53896&p=170910&hilit=kramer). Example of a silver Tavanne Swiss-made chronometric watch marked with the L. Kramer & Co. name as the distributor of this watch. This watch is identified as probably having been made between 1910-1919. It measures 44.45 mm wide and 7.84 mm thick (no height is provided). From a current eBay auction (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tavanns-chronometer-pocket-watch-L-kramer-co-silver-900-frame-as-coins-Rare/163908716525) Image of one of the L. Kramer shops in Cairo, identified as from 1901 on the www.925-1000.com website's Middle East Trade section. The source of the illustration is not identified. (http://925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=53896#p171422). Adolphe L. Kramer, who is identified in the 1943 edition of Le Mondain Egyptienne: The Egyptian Who's Who: L'Annuaire de l'Elite d'Egypte, F. E. Noury & Fils., Le Caire on page 165 as a jeweler located at 6 rue Malek el-Afdal, Zamalek, Cairo who started his business there in 1893, may be a successor to L. Kramer. Adolphe L. Kramer appears to have had several shop locations for selling watches and possibly jewelry other than the rue Malek el-Afdal location as well. Below are a series of 7 different advertisement designs that Adolphe L. Kramer used in the the 1939 edition of Le Mondain Egyptienne: The Egyptian Who's Who: L'Annuaire de l'Elite d'Egypte, F. E. Noury & Fils., Le Caire, as examples of his company's visibility. Kramer paid for the use of these designs multiple times throughout this particular edition, and was the only jeweler to advertise in this Who's Who publication. Only one other watchmaker (Tavannes) advertised in this 1939 social listing. The image of each advertisement shows the page number on which it first appears. All of these advertisements from the 1939 Who's Who identify the el-Mankh Street as Kramer's former business address, with his 1939 address as 41 rue Maleka Farida, Cario. Kramer did not place any advertisements in the 1941 or 1943 editions of Le Mondain Egyptienne, although he is listed in the 1939, 1941, and 1943 editions (complete pdfs of these are available online) and his photo is included in his listing in the 1941 edition. The Adolphe L. Kramer business is noted as formerly having been located on Manakh Street (see below), suggesting he is a successor to L. Kramer. Adolphe L. Kramer is identified in that 1943 Who's Who listing as having been awarded the British War medal and Victory medal with an MiD. From page 35. From page 38. From page 44. From page 53. From page 74. From page 79. From page 108. A Zivy Frères & Cie. advertisement for a manufacturer I have seen identified for only one example of the Mixed Courts' judges' badges. This advertisement is identified as from 1918. See my discussion of this manufacturer in my post of 24 April, 2019 on this thread that a business card and an advertisement for Zivy Frères & Cie. in the 7th and 8th images in that post. Of interest, the above advertisement identifies the date of the establishment of Zivy Frères & Cie. as 1863, something not seen in the materials I posted on 24 April. The above advertisement is from the www.925-1000.com website, in the the Middle East Trade section (http://925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=53896#p171422). Another advertisement for Zivy Frères & Cie. from a 1911 guidebook to Alexandria: A Few Lines About Alexandria: Its Climate, Antiquities, Beauties and Monuments, 1911. Issued by the Municipality of Alexandria, Egypt. Whitehead, Morris & Co. Ltd. Alexandria. (http://www.cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000039_w.pdf) Image of the Cesar Zivy jeweler's store from the www.925-1000.com website's Middle East Trade section (http://925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=53896#p171422). The illustration is identified as having been published in 1901, but the source of the photo is not given. Jules Cesar Zivy, who may be (or have been?) one of the Zivy brothers in the business identified as having made judicial badges for the magistrates and other functionaries of the Mixed Courts. Jules Cesar Zivy is credited with founding the Le Nil Masonic lodge in Alexandria.
×
×
  • Create New...