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Rusty Greaves

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About Rusty Greaves

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  1. Lars, Thanks for the good photos of these 2 additional miniatures of the Order of Ismail and the information about the other 2 examples from eBay. Do any of these other 2 have any manufacture's marks on the reverse? In your miniature collection, do you have any Egyptian minis of any medals (particularly Khedive or Kingdom era awards) with maker's marks on their reverse? Owain started a thread "Miniatures of the Middle East & Arab World" on 6 December, 2017 in this "Middle East & Arab States" section on GMIC. Owain mentions several manufacturers of Egyptian miniatures, but so far I have not found any images of manufactures' marks in any illustrations from auction listings. It would be interesting to see any Egyptian makers' marks if there are some in your collection. Rusty
  2. Owain, Many thanks for posting these high resolution images of 2 Order of Ismail minis. I have not seen the eBay listings (on US or UK eBay). I assume the descriptions provided no measurements? The second mini looks significantly like the obverse of the high resolution image I posted on 18 November, 2018 (same linear defect in the enamel of the superior arm of the star). The reverse of that mini is illustrated as the right hand image in my 23 March 2020 post (shown in the first image below). The staining on the reverse is identical to that seen in your 4th photo above. Both of the past images I have posted of what I think is the same mini show it with the 5th Class Knight's ribbon (with rosette and no galon). I wonder why the ribbon is not shown in this recent eBay listing? Rusty Image I posted on 23 March, 2020 showing obverse and reverse of what I think is this same miniature Order of Ismail as in Owain's post above. The reverse appears to have the identical staining as in Owain's 4th photo in the 20 April, 2020 post. From an 8 January, 2020 Auction by Heritage Auctions Europe (Lot 4592), archived on The Saleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/mpo/catalogue-id-mpo-mu10002/lot-e12f6a1a-b1cf-4f13-8be2-ab3600ab5f08) Image of the obverse of what I think is the same miniature as Owain illustrated in the 3rd photo of his recent post of 20 April, 2020. This is a higher resolution photo of the same miniature shown above from the January, 2020 Auction by Heritage Auctions Europe (Lot 4592) in my 20 April, 2020 post. I have previously included this as the lower of 2 Order of Ismail minis in the 1st photo from my post of 10 November, 2018. I also cropped this portion of that image as the 5th photo in my post of 13 December, 2018. This photo came from a 2018 auction of La Galerie Numismatique, archived on the Sixbid.com website (https://www.sixbid.com/browse.html?auction=5367&category=168960&lot=4479891). This shows the same linear defect in the enamel of the superior arm of the star near the margin of the central medallion, and a couple irregularities in the margin of the central gold & blue enamel medallion boss with the "Ismail" inscription in the 9:00 and 11:00 positions (in addition to other similarities seen in the illustration you included above). This photo can be zoomed for much more detail and to compare with the ribbon-less example in the 3rd photo of your above post. I have seen few miniature examples with the very light blue enamel on the star's arms and the central inscribed medallion boss as shown in the first of your photos above from 20 April, 2020. Above is a very small, low-resolution images that shows this lighter blue enamel from a 28 July, 2016 auction by H. D. Rauch Gmbh (Lot 332) that is archived on the acsearch.info website (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3201427). This comes from a group of 11 miniatures on a chain. This is a cropped image of what I included as the 2nd photo in my post of 10 November, 2018. Owain, you also showed a better photo of the obverse of a mini of the Order of Ismail with this lighter blue enamel in the photo posted on 11 December, 2017 on the "Miniatures of the Middle East & Arab World" thread here on GMIC.
  3. I recently came across several photographs of judges and lawyers in Egypt from a group of materials curated in the New York University Abu Dhabi, Akkasah, Center for Photography’s Yasser Alwan Collection (http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/akkasah/alwan/scopecontent.html). These images were collected by Yasser Alwan, a photographer in Cairo currently teaching photography at the German University in Cairo. The collection includes more than 2,000 photos, principally from the 1920s1940s of a broad array of ethnic and cultural diversity of Egyptian society in the early–mid 20th century. Most of the images come from purchases at flea markets and bookshops in Cairo that Yasser Alwan began collecting in the 1990s. It is an eclectic collection of family photos, studio work, tourist postcards, etc. of a diversity of Egyptian ethnicities and social roles through out he country. Within this collection are several that show individuals in the legal profession. All of those I have reviewed are Egyptians, not foreign judges, lawyers, or court professionals. Of interest, is that some of these have dates. Several show individuals who are judges wearing the bi-colored sashes (red and green) with the crescent and star emblems, such as several I have posted on this thread. I have generally been unable to identify dates for those images, and have been unsure what roles these legal professionals held. I have made several errors in how I interpreted what those individuals might represent within the Egyptian legal system. With the addition of some dates, I believe that I can more securely infer that individuals wearing this particular regalia are officials of the Indigenous Courts (sometimes called “Native Courts”), that adjudicated cases that were strictly between Egyptian citizens and not the Mixed Courts, that were designed to address a range of legal concerns with the many foreigners living and doing business in Egypt in the late 19th-mid 20thcentury. I have suggested that this need partly arose from the increase in foreign commerce associated with the downturn in the American cotton industry during the American Civil War, and continued to expand through patronage and support infrastructure (i.e., the Suez Canal) promoting continued foreign investment and business activity. I’m sure this is only a cartoon characterization of these complex events. However, while there is good literature about the costume of the judges and other officials of the Egyptian Mixed Courts, I have had a number of ongoing questions about that of the Indigenous Courts. These good-resolution images from the New York University Abu Dhabi, Akkasah, Center for Photography’s Yasser Alwan Collection (some with dates) help to move my understanding of these different judicial regalia just a little bit further. I have previously encountered several low-resolution photos of individuals identified as judges, officials in the prosecutors office (Parquet), and legal advisors, and some of those images have dates (for example a few Facebook posts), but have been unable to get more reliable information about those images. I am presenting these photos as they appear in the New York University Abu Dhabi, Akkasah, Center for Photography’s Yasser Alwan Collection online catalog, not in any chronological, geographic, or especially thematic groupings. The original images in the New York University Abu Dhabi, Akkasah, Center for Photography’s Yasser Alwan Collection online catalog can be zoomed for much greater detail than the versions I was able to download here. All of the photos below are accessed using the following catalog link for Series II: Egypt 1895-1971: (http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/akkasah/alwan/dscref179.html). I then have some lower resolution images from a Facebook posting about Egyptian legal history, that provide additional dated images of Indigenous Court officials in their regalia. Finally, I want to try and correct some of the erroneous information I have posted here about other photos I have found of individuals in wearing similar insignia, before I figured some of this out a bit better. An undated image of a seated man wearing a bi-colored sash (red and green) with one of the Mixed Courts badges (probably silver). He also wears a 5th Class Knight Order of the Nile badge pinned to a western-style dinner jacket (tailcoat?) with white tie and a white vest (rather than the Egyptian stambouline), and a tarbush. This emphasis on western dress (other than the tabush) is seen worn in all of the photos I am posting here abut the Indigenous Court. While the stamboulin appears to have been intentionally selected or the Mixed Courts to emphasize the Egyptian nature of these Courts that included so many foreign personnel, the Indigenous Court emphasized Egypt's judiciary wearing more European style of dress. (AD-MC-002_ref104, Box 1 Folder 10). The catalog description states “An Egyptian official wearing a sash and medals. 13.6 x 8.5 cm, Unknown (Photographer)”. Below is a version of this same photo that I have enlarged and cropped. Cropped higher resolution version of the same image above. (AD-MC-002_ref104, Box 1 Folder 10). The above undated photo shows an Egyptian man wearing a lawyer’s robe (or academic robe) with silk borders on the sleeves and a silk (?) lining visible at the collar, tarbush, and the academic épitoge. He wears a crescent pin and 3 silver star pins, as seen on several images I have posted on this thread, but they are attached to the épitoge, not a sash as most of those images I’ve previously posted show. I am now convinced that the crescent and star(s) are the regalia of offcials in the Indigenous Courts. There is a very strong resemblance between this man and the previous photo (as an older man?), that may suggest this a studio portrait following his graduation from university or earlier practice as a lawyer in the Indigenous Courts before being raised to service in the Mixed Tribunals. (AD-MC-002_ref378, Box 2 Folder 13). This image is identified in the catalog as: “A man in a robe, tarbouche and sash with a crescent moon and three stars. 13.5 x 8.6 cm. London Studio, Cairo (Egypt).” A photograph date 31 October, 1941 of a man wearing a single colored (red?) sash with the decorative knot as worn by judges and some officials in the Mixed Courts with gold metallic fringe. He has a crescent and single star pins attached to his sash, indicting service in the Indigenous Courts. He is wearing the tarbush and a western (not stambouline) style coat. this image shows fairly well the same decorative knot and the gold metallic fringe of the sash as those of the Mixed Courts(AD-MC-002-ref407, Box 2 Folder 15). The catalog description states: “A man wearing a sash resting on a tall side table. 13.5 x 8.4 cm. K. Jacob, Egypt (Photographer )”. A photo dated 1 January, 1930 of a young lawyer of the Indigenous Courts wearing a legal or academic robe (with silk margins of the sleeves). He wears the épitoge with a crescent pin and 3 star pins, and tarbush. (AD-MC-002-ref1203, Box 6 Folder 11). The catalog description reads: “A young lawyer, wearing a robe and a sash”, 31.8 cm X 22.0 cm, Mitry’s Studio. Cairo.” The studio name is embossed on the mat frame of the photo (not shown in this cropped version), the handwritten name appears to be “H [L or S?] Fariq (?)” along with the date. An undated photo of officials from one of the Indigenous Courts, probably in Mansourah. I cannot tell if they would be judges or other court functionaries. In the back row, the 3 men on the left are probably guards and the other two men are dressed anomalously (the man on the far right has no tie and a more traditional rather than western-form of shirt). Almost all of these med wear bi-colored sashes (green and red) except for the men 2nd and 3rd from the left in the 1strow; and those 2nd and 3rd from the right in the 1st row (whose sashes are likely red). The man 5thfrom the right might have single colored sash (lighter color, green?), and the man 3rdfrom the left in the 2nd row may have a monochrome sash (it appears lighter and may be green?). All of the men wear a crescent and 1 star on their sashes, except the man seated in the middle of the 1st row. Above the crescent on his bicolored sash is a single larger star (same size as worn by the others) surmounted by 2 smaller stars and 2 small stars also are pinned below the crescent, making 5 stars. While all wear tarbush, none are wearing the stambouline high-collared coat, but have western style coats. (AD-MC-002-ref1299, Box 7 Folder 10). The catalog description reads: “A group of men in suits and tarbushes with sashes with the crescent and star emblem (linked ref1168 and ref1169). 41.1 x 44.5 cm. Photo Gabriel, Mansourah (Egypt)”. Undated photo (except as 1923-1952) of men in front of the Supreme Court in Cairo wearing monochrome sashes, all with tarbush, and all wearing uniformly identical western-style coats. The sash hues looks lighter-colored, suggesting it is green, which would indicate these men are judges of the Indigenous Appeals Court, or the Court of Cassation (instituted in 1930). The gold metallic fringe of some of the ends of the sash can be seen on a few of the men in the front row. There might be a few men with darker colored sashes (1st man on the left in the front row; 1st man on the left in the 2nd row; and 1st man on the right in the front row. In the original online image in the catalog that is much higher resolution it appears that all of the men (except the man 8thfrom the right or 9thfrom the left of the first row) wear a crescent pin with 3 star pins. The pins worn by the man in the centre of the front row are arranged with: above his crescent are two stars just above the horns of the crescent; and above that are 4 stars arranged in a diamond pattern; below the crescent are 2 stars oriented in line with the 2 above the horns of the crescent; and a single star is pinned below those stars centered between them; for a total of 9 stars. This man is either the President of the Appeals Court, or the Prosecutor General. All the men are wearing western style coats, not stambouline. (AD-MC-002-ref1301, Box 7 Folder 10). The catalog description reads: “A group of men in sashes with a crescent moon on them, in front of the Supreme Court, Cairo, Egypt. 29.5 x 34.8 cm, Unknown (Photographer)”. The following images are from Facebook site dedicated to some information about the history of Egypt’s legal systems. It appears to focus on the Indigenous Courts and does not present information about the Mixed Courts. (History of Egyptian Judicial system -تاريخالقضاءالمصري). Several of the images are identified as part of the Indigenous (or “Native”) Courts. All of them are moderate to low-resolution with minimally greater detail available by zooming them. Moderate-resolution photo of the legal advisors for the Indigenous Court of Appeals in Cairo in 1895. The 50th Anniversary Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume I have used for information about the Mixed Courts (Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926) uses this term (Conseillers) to refer to legal advisors of the court, not judges of those courts, although many of the legal advisors have been judges or later served as such. All of the men wear monochrome (green) pleated sashes, the stambouline, and tarbush. All wear a crescent and single star pin, except the man seated in the middle of the front row of men in chairs. His sash appears to exhibit a single large star centered above the crescent (same size as those worn by the other men) surmounted by 3 smaller star pins, and having 3 small stars pinned below the crescent for a total of 7 stars. This individual may be the President of the Appeals Court, or some other head of the legal advisors to the Appeals Court. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/pb.292684487584798.-2207520000.1550685816./292919867561260/?type=3&theater) A moderate-resolution photo of the legal advisors (Conseillers) to the Indigenous Appeals Court in Cairo from 1909. Except for the 2 men in military uniform at the far right and left of the 3rd row (guards?), all of the officials pictured wear a monochrome pleated sash (green), tarbush, and western-style jackets. All of their sashes include the crescent and a single star. The building behind the group is the old home of the Appeals Court. (From:https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/pb.292684487584798.-2207520000.1550685816./961717970681443/?type=3&theater) Low-resolution image of the Judges of the Cairo Indigenous Court of the First Instance, 31 December, 1933. Again, all of the men wear tarbush and western-style jackets. All of their sashes appear to be monochrome (red?) in this low-resolution image. The gold metallic fringe of the sash worn by the judge on the far right in the 2nd row can be distinguished. It is difficult to be certain, but all the insignia on the sashes appear to be crescents with a single star, it is not apparent whether any of the men have more than one star. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/a.292686157584631/292686144251299/?type=1&theater) Portrait of the Parquet (the prosecutor’s office) of the Indigenous Court from 1926, with low-resolution. The Parquet members all wear tarbush, the same style western jackets, white ties, and white waistcoats. Except for the man 5th from the right in the 2nd row (with no sash), they all are wearing bicolored sashes (red and green). The sash of the man at the far left does not show the 2 colors well, but it is most probably also a red and green sash. The poor resolution of the image makes it difficult to identify the variation in the sash insignia on the Parquet officials, but all of the men in the 2nd and 3rd rows appear to wear crescents with single stars, while all of the seated men in the first row, except that on the far right (?) appear to have multiple star pins, above and below their crescents. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/pb.292684487584798.-2207520000.1550685816./526293057557272/?type=3&theater) Low-resolution copy of a portrait of the Prosecutor General of the Indigenous Court Parquet and his chief staff officials in 1932. All wear tarbush and identical western style coats with white tie and white vests. Only the 2nd man from the left in the second row, wearing either a 4th or 5th Class Order of the Nile medal, is not wearing a sash. The man third from the right in the 1st row is wearing a monochrome sash (green or red?), but all of the other sashes are bicolored (red and green). Other than the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd seated men from the right in the first row, most appear to be wearing a single star wit their crescent pin. The first man on the right in the 1strow appears to have 3 stars above the crescent (1 near the middle of the upper portion of the crescent and two above that) and possibly 2 stars below the crescent (?). The 2nd official from the right in the 1strow wears 3 stars above the crescent (also oriented with one between the horns of the crescent and 2 stars above that spaced more laterally) and possibly 2 stars below the crescent). The man 3rdfrom the right, probably the Prosecutor General, has 3 smaller stars just within the superior portion of the crescent and another symbol above those stars. This is probably a royal crown pin, as seen below in the portrait of Adbel Aziz Fahmy. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/pb.292684487584798.-2207520000.1550685816./526293057557272/?type=3&theater) Low-resolution portrait of Prosecutor General and other chief officials of the Indigenous Courts’ Parquet, 31 December, 1933. This photo was taken on the same day and the same location as that above of the Indigenous Court of the First Instance. All are dressed in tarbush and western-style jackets. Most appear to be wearing bi-colored sashes (red and green) except the man seated 4th from the right in the front row with no sash. The man standing at the far right in 2nd row and the man standing 5thfrom the right (behind the man without a sash) may have monochrome sashes (?). It is hard to make out the number of stars pinned to their sashes, even the crescent is difficult to distinguish on some individuals. The seated man 2nd from the right in the front row has 3 stars above the crescent (a single star just above the center of the crescent and 2 stars superior to that more laterally placed). The seated man at the far right in the front row appears to have 3 stars similarly pinned above the crescent and probably 3 stars below the crescent. The man standing furthest right in the 2nd row appears to have three stars above the crescent, a single star above the open middle of the crescent and 2 stars superior to that more laterally pinned. He may also have 2 or 3 stars pinned below the crescent, 2 laterally-placed stars may be apparent below his crescent pin. The 2 colors of his sash The man standing 2nd from the left in the 2nd row appears to have 3 stars above the crescent, a single stars surmounted by 2 more laterally places stars. Note that all the men in this portrait are wearing medals. The resolution is too poor to hazard any guess about what they may be. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/pb.292684487584798.-2207520000.1550685816./526294207557157/?type=3&theater) An unspecified group of officials of the Indigenous Court in an undated low-resolution portrait. Most appear to be wearing monochrome sashes (red?) and only the man seated 3rd from the left in the 1st row, seated furthest right in the 1st row, the man on the far right in the 2nd row, and the 2 men standing 2nd and 3rd from the right in the 3rd row are wearing bicolored (red and green) sashes. The man standing furthest to the left in the third row does not have a sash. The back row appears to be guards or other non judicial staff. Except for these men in the back row, all of the others wear tarbush with western-style jackets, not stambouline. From what is visible in this image, all appear to be wearing a crescent and a just a single star. Text associated with this image discusses some aspects of variation in sash from and use prior to 1952, but mostly that after the establishment of the Republic. Of possible relevance to some of the pre-1952 Indigenous Court regalia, the Facebook text suggest that in modern usage, the head of the Judicial Council and the Prosecutor General wear 7 stars and in addition to the Eagle of Saladin (instead of the monarchy era use of the crescent). (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/a.939182679601639/945654215621152/?type=3&theater) Portrait of Abdel Aziz Fahmy, one of the founders of the Wafd party in one of the most common portraits of him. This shows him wearing a monochrome sash (green) sash showing a small portion of the crescent pin, one star, and a royal crown pin (as seen on the sash of the Prosecutor General seated in the middle of the 1st row in the above picture of the Parquet in 1932). Although an important early original proponent of a parliamentary system in Egypt, Abdel Aziz Fahmy Pasha was also a monarchist. He was made the President of the newly created Court of Cassation by King Fuad I, in 1930. I have not identified a date for this photo, but it is certainly after his appointment as President of the Court of Cassation (essentially a Supreme Court above the Indigenous Appeals Courts that could hear appeals from defendants or public prosecutors), likely 1931 or just a bit later. He was awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of Ismail and the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Nile. The medal ribbon visible in this image however, is not either one of those awards. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/a.939182679601639/971223233064250/?type=3&theater) I have previously made several mistakes about the crescent and star regalia as post-1949 court regalia, following the closure of the Mixed Courts on 14 October, 1949. I posted photos of some individuals with sashes and the crescent and star pins who are actually judges or officials with the Indigenous Courts, and some of these individuals may have been photographed during the pre-1949 period (as is the case for the 2 individuals in the dated photos from the New York University Abu Dhabi, Akkasah, Center for Photography’s Yasser Alwan Collection [the 4th and 5th photos in this post]) and the dated group portraits form the Facebook History of Egyptian Judicial system, shown above. I wish to include those images I previously made erroneous assessments of here in this post, so that the information is in one more correct placement. I apologize for duplicating these images. Except for those of lawyers, I do not know whether any of these individuals were judges or other officials in the Indigenous Courts. Among my continued questions about this regalia is what the insignia variation between the crescent and a single star (common), the crescent and 3 stars (common), and the crescent and multiple stars (7-9) may indicate about rank or roles of these different officials of the Indigenous Courts. Undated portrait of an Indigenous Court official in a bicolored sash (red and green) with a crescent and single star. He wears a western-style jacket and white tie, and is not wearing his tarbush. This image shows particularly well the decorative knot and gold metallic fringe on his sash. The glossiness of the green portion of his sash suggests it is made of silk. I included this as the 4th photo in my post of 12 September, 2018, and mistakenly identified the man as a post-1949 judge. When I created that post, I had recently been researching a commemorative medal and stamp regarding the closing of the Mixed Courts in 1949. However, I had also encountered information about a British judge who had served both on the Mixed and Indigenous Courts. As noted in my post 19 April, 2019, Alexander Cockburn McBarnet was one of the few men I could identify with service on the Native Courts who also was associated with a silver Mixed Courts judicial badge of the Froment-Meurice design. I therefore assumed it likely that at least some officials of the Indigenous Courts wore this same regalia (and as there were many more members of the Indigenous Courts, it might also partly explain why so many more silver badges were appeared on auction sites than the gold and silver badges [of the Mixed District Courts] or the gold badges [of the Mixed Appeals Courts]. A November 2017 auction by Brightwell’s included a number of medals and clothing belonging to McBarnet, including a silver Froment-Meurice designed Mixed Court badge. The auction listing states that McBarnet had been appointed as a judge of the ‘Native” Appeals Court after serving as a District Judge in Asyut (probably also in the Indigenous Courts that had courts there which the Mixed Tribunals did not). Information from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 50th anniversary volume about the Mixed Courts indicted that McBarnet was a legal advisor to the Indigenous Appeals Court and later served the Mixed Tribunals Appeals Court (also as legal advisor?). In hindsight, it is likely that McBarnet’s Froment-Meurice designed badge came from that court service, and not as a conseillerto the Indigenous courts. Only later, with my stumbling on additional photographic material of a range of officials other than judges of the Mixed Courts also wearing the Fromenet-Meurice designed badges, did it become apparent that such badges were more common than just the numbers of the judiciary of the Mixed Tribunals. That is when I started t realize that the crescent and star insignia likely designated officials in the separate Indigenous judiciary, but not before I had muddied the water here on GMIC. For that reason, I wish to try and correct some of my erroneous statements, although there is still a great deal about the Indigenous Courts and its costume variation that is opaque to me. The above image comes from a former eBay auction. (From: https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-A-small-judge-wearing-a-scarf/312191646480?hash=item48b0127b10:g:UMcAAOSw0S9bThIn) Undated portait of another official of the Indigenous Courts with a bicolored sash (red and green) and a single crescent and star pin. The western jacket (and its lapel configuration), white tie, and a white waistcoat is identicla ot the standardized dress of the men shown in the Facebook image illustrated above of the Indigenous Court Parquet form 1926, who also wear a bicolred sash and the majority have a crescent and single star as well. I previously posted this as the 5th photo in my post of 12 September, 2018. Again, I mistakenly identified him as a post-1949 judge, although I have no way of knowing when this images dates to. This studio portrait was made by Photo Varjadedian, Zagazig. From a past eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-Armenian-photographer-in-Egypt-Judge-with-the-scarf-PHOTO-VARIJABEDIAN/273203620917?hash=item3f9c346c35:g:zm0AAOSwf95a80zw). A dated portrait of a man identified as a policeman, Ali Arafa of Port Said, wearing a bicolored sash (hand-tinted in green and red) with a crescent and single star. His wearing a white uniform surprises me, especially given that almost every photo of individuals of the Indigenous Court wear civilian westernized dress. There is a strong probability that the subject chose to be depicted this way as a vanity combination of 2 roles he held, rather than it representing an accepted combination of the court regalia with his police uniform. The date written on the lower right of the photo, “١٩٢٠”=1920. I previously posted this image as the 1st photo of my 6 November, 2018 post on this thread. From a past eBay auction, of a 23 x 188 cm. (From: https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-POLICE-OFFICER-Judge-HAND-COLOR-ALI-ARAFA-PORT-SAID-/273502359767?_trksid=p2385738.m4383.l4275.c10) Undated portrait of an Indigenous Court official in a bicolored sash (red and green) with crescent and 3 stars. He wears a western-style jacket. I previously posted this as the 1st photo, 1 November 2018, again spuriously identifying him as a post-1949 judge. The photo shows well the decorative knot and gold metallic fringe of the sash. This 14 X 9 cm original print was made by Studio Vart, in Cairo. From a past eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-Armenian-photographer-in-Egypt-Judge-With-a-medal-and-scarf-STUDIO-VART/273500934866). Undated portrait of a young Indigenous Court official wearing a bicolored (red and green), pleated sash with a crescent and 3 stars. He wears a western-style jacket and his tarbush is resting on the prop table with book, common in many of these studio images of court officials. I previously posted this as the 2nd photo of 1 Novmber, 2018 post. 23 x 16 cm original print, Studio Abdel. This comes from a from a past eBay auction offering (From: https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-A-young-judge-with-scarf-studio-adel/273502381828) Undated studio portrait of a man wearing tarbush, western-style jacket, a monochrome pleated sash (green?) with a crescent and 7 stars. I previously included this illustration as the 3rd photo in my post of 28 April, 2018. This portrait comes from the Photo Ramses Studio, Cairo. This man is likely a high-ranked individual (president or Prosecutor General?) in either the Indigenous Appeals Court or possibly one of the Courts of the First Instance (in which case his sash would probably be red). (This image comes from a Piccssr link that no longer funcitons: http://picssr.com/photos/kelisli/interesting/page21?nsid=7892156@N08) An interesting undated portrait of an Egyptian Indigenous Court official in traditional clothes and a uniquely configured sash. The tricolored sash (probably with red border stripes and a green central stripe) is not seen on any other photos of court officials I have encountered. A Pinterest image of a sash with 3 stripes (red borders and a green central stripe) appears in a Turkish Pinterest site with a set of crescent and 3 star pins (shown below) that I also have previously illustrated on this thread. The 9 star pins arrangement with the crescent also is quite unusual. Only the individual described in the undated group photo in front of the Supreme Court building in Cairo photo (shown above) from the Yasser Alwan Collection exhibits this many star pins. The nine star pins on that man’s sash have a different configuration: first, all the star pins on his sash are the same size (“small”); above his crescent are two stars just above the horns of the crescent; and above that are 4 stars arranged in a diamond pattern; below the crescent are 2 stars oriented in line with the 2 above the horns of the crescent; and a single star is pinned below those stars centered between them. I previously included this as the 6th photo in my post of 12 September, 2018. I also posted this portrait as the 1st photo in my post of 7 November, 2018 along with 2 additional photos of this same man. All photos of this man show him in a turban rather than a tarbush, and wearing the traditional gallebaya. The appearance of this high official in traditional, but unofficial, dress in this portrait, that in his large and well-appointed office, and the 3rd photo of him dressed equivalently seems surprising. Again, the emphasis on court officials wearing tarbush with a European-syle jacket (compared with the intentional shift in the Mixed Courts toward having foreign and Egyptian judges all wear he stamboulin and tarbush to emphasize the Egyptian nature of this International Tribunal) contrasts markedly with the 3 photos of this man. I don’t know if there is a chance he may represent a cleric, or just a very traditional (and influential) individual? It is unfortunate that no dates are identified for these three portrait photos. While the Indigenous Courts developed from Egyptian Islamic Courts, it is apparent that by the early 20th century the institution had a pronounced stamp of westernized modernity, and conformity to that “progressive” norm. I previously mistakenly identified this individual as a post-1949 judge, again assuming that the crescent and star configuration replaced the possible use of badges similar to those worn by judges and other officials of the Mixed Courts. This image comes from a past eBay auction of an original 14 x 9 cm matted print (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-OLD-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-Judge-with-the-scarf/273147885787?hash=item3f98e1f8db:g:5lkAAOSw13ZayXDv). A color image of a used tricolor sash similar to that worn by the man in the above portrait. This Pinterest image includes regalia of both the Mixed Courts (the silver Froment-Meurice sash badge) and the Indigenous Courts (the silver crescent and 3 star pins). The text associated with this Pinterest post does not provide any useful information. I initially thought perhaps the association of this sash with both sets of regalia implied use by an Egyptian functionary of the Mixed Courts who continued to work for the courts and retired his Mixed Courts badge for the Indigenous Courts insignia after the dissolution of the Mixed Courts in October of 1949. That could be possible, but, if they did belong to one individual, it might equally well indicate an Indigenous Court functionary transferred to serve on the Mixed Courts. Such a scenario is suggested by the 1st and 3rd photos in this post (if they do represent the same man) that might represent a young lawyer beginning his career in the Indigenous Courts and then being re-assigned to the Mixed Courts. As noted, the British judge to the Indigenous Courts, Alexander Cockburn McBarnet, whose auction materials included a Mixed Courts silver Froment-Meurice designed badge, but also should have employed the crescent and star(s) devices during his roles on the Indigenous Courts, also served both the Indigenous and Mixed Courts during his career in Egypt. I previously posted this as the 1st photo in my post of 28 April, 2018. (From: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/475340935664787041/) Undated portrait of the same Indigenous Court official in a sumptuously appointed office. I previously included this as the 2nd photo in my post of 7 November, 2018. From a past eBay auction of a 14 x 9 cm original print (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-OLD-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-Judge-in-his-office/273147887546?hash=item3f98e1ffba:g:k~oAAOSwlJlayXGK:rk:30:pf:0). The same Indigenous Court official standing on a boardwalk in traditional garb with no judicial regalia in an undated portrait. I previously included this as the 2nd photo in my post of 7 November, 2018. This is from a past eBay auction listing of a 14 x 9 cm original print that was still being offered into at least the end of 2019 (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-OLD-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-Judge-standing-on-the-bridge/312105737674?hash=item48aaf39dca:g:OPsAAOSwH1VayXIX:rk:31:pf:0). I previously posted the above undated, hand-tinted image of a female Egyptian lawyer working on the Indigenous Courts wearing a lawyers’ or academic robe with an épitoge that has a crescent pin with a single superior star pin. This was the last photo in my post of 22 August, 2019, that principally addressed the jurist and expressionist painter Mahmoud Saïd. I have not been able to identify this woman. Again I mistakenly thought she might represent a post-1949 lawyer. (From: https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-OLD-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-CUTE-LAWYER-WITH-THE-SCARF-HAND-COLORED-/273361632578?nma=true&si=mpDX%2FvmJ3j93DINpvfI%2FS1m09vQ%3D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557) Above and below are a couple images of the first woman lawyer in modern Egypt, Naima el-Ayoubi. She was among the first five women who attended King Fuad I University in 1929. Those first women women law students were: Sahir al-Qalamawi, Naima el-Ayoubi, Fatma Salem, Zahira Abdel Aziz and Fatma Fahmy. They graduated in 1932 and Naima el-Ayoubi was admitted to the bar in 1933. In this image she is wearing a lawyer’s robe, rabat (scarf), and an épitoge adorned with a crescent and 3 stars. (From: https://www.facebook.com/292684487584798/photos/a.939182679601639/954572224729351/?type=3&theater) Naima el-Ayoubi on the cover of ““Al Aroussa” Magazine in 1933. (From: Women of Egypt Mag: https://womenofegyptmag.com/2018/10/18/egyptian-women-in-the-workforce-then-and-now/) Undated image of a Republic period judge showing the monochrome (green) pleated sash with the insignia of the Eagle of Saladin (replacing the Ottoman crescent) and 3 star pins of the Highest Court.The stars are placed in a different arrangement than in the recent photo below. I previously posted this as the 3rd photo of my post of 12 September, 2018. From past eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-OLD-VINTAGE-PHOTOGRAPH-Judge-with-the-scarf/273416587171?hash=item3fa8e607a3:g:dKkAAOSwK6NbebRb) Modern Egyptian judges of the Supreme Judicial Council in front ( with green sashes) and judges of Lower Courts (2 men with red sashes are visible behind the front group of judges). This shows the pleated sash of the Supreme Judicial Council (similar in style to those of the Appeals Courts of both the past Mixed and Indigenous Courts), the probably unpleated red sash of the lower courts, and a consistent placement of the gold Eagle of Saladin pin with 3 gold stars superior to the eagle. This is a photo taken of Egyptian judges during protests, March 4th 2006. I previously posted his image as the 4th photo of my post of 28 April, 2018 on this thread. (From: http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/3388/941/1600/IMG_2412.jpg)
  4. gfh, Many thanks of the additional information and illustrations. Have you encountered images of any of the other executed badges made from the designs shown in the lower panel? I also want to thank you for the very informative eBay listings for your FFL pins and the very thorough photographic documentation you provided. As a non-collector, I rely on a lot of auction sites for some comparative images in my amateur research, and of course, the quality of photos and information runs the full range from excellent to drek. I was very impressed with the effort and knowledge you put into those eBay listings. Military issue (1941) identity card for Fahmy Tewfik Bichay (spelled "Fahmi Tawfik Bishay") from a section of the MP Antique et Militaria website that illustrates and identifies a number of South African Air Force squadron pins that the site moderator obtained personally from Fahmy Tewfik Bichay in the 1950s after he had emigrated to Canada (http://www.militaria.qc.ca/air-force/south-africa.html). I previously posted this ID as the last photo in my post of 21 October, 2019 where I was illustrating some variation in J. Lattes cases (mostly for the more common Order of the Nile in that post) & labels as well as the fewer examples of labels I've encountered for Tewfik Bichay and Fahmy Tewfik Bichay, on the thread "Question about the Order of Ismail/Nishan al-Ismail", started on 8 November, 2017, in the "Middle East & Arab States" subsection, under the "Rest of the World: Medals & Military" section here on GMIC. Are the illustrations in your last post from Sadek Tewfik Bichay? He designed a medal commemorating the closing of the Egyptian International Tribunals (the Mixed Courts) on 14 October, 1949. One of the requirements for service as a judge on those Courts was fluency in French.
  5. I was interested to see this Cairo-made Free French Forces badge. I mostly dabble in research on a small number of Egyptian medals (I'm not a collector), but Fahmy Tewfik Bichay, one of a Egyptian family of medal makers, recently turned up in my auction site searches of photographs with a few Cairo-made Free French Forces enamel pins. Only one has a "T. BICHAY" maker's mark on the reverse, apparently it was quite common for his work on these pins to be unmarked. The original auction listing show images of the reverse of all 6 of these badges, but only the first example is marked. The seller of these pins also notes in the auction description that: "This and other Free French badges I have listed originally had locking pin reverses. Mr. Fahmy Bichay removed these and replaced them with clutch style pins in the early 1980s; traces of the original pin mountings are visible in some cases. At the same time these were altered, he also replaced the pins on a series of South African "Sweetheart" style squadron badges that the company had also made during the war." The first 5 of these image come from an 18 February, 2018 eBay auction, archived on the WorthPoint.com website. The 3rd-to-last image is also an eBay auction listing archived on WorthPoint.com, but I cannot identify the auction date for it. The seller states that all of these are original, not replica Cairo-made pieces. The final 2 photos in this post, from the same seller, show a pin identified as a copy that was made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay in 1977. Obverse of a Free French Forces enamel pin featuring the design of the Croix de Lorraine, that the seller states was adopted as the symbol of the Free French Forces in 1940 and was featured as part of many Free French Badges. The auction description does not identify the measurements of this pin, but one of the photographs is provided with coins (a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin) for scale (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cairo-made-croix-de-lorraine-badge-1915138740) Reverse of the same Free French Forces enamel pin with the design of the Croix de Lorraine on the obverse. This is the only example of the 6 pins this seller had on offer in this auction with Fahmy Tewfik Bichay's maker's mark on the reverse. Obverse of a Cairo made Free French Forces enamel pin identified by seller as made for the Commandant Dominé by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay (Cairo). The seller provided Wikipedia information that: the Commandant Dominé was an Elan class vessel made as a minesweeper, although none of these vessels were apparently used in that capacity; and that the Commandant Dominé served with the Free French Forces after following use in the Dunkirk evacuation and having been interned in England. An image of the reverse is included in the archived auction listing, showing no maker's mark but evidence of the refitting of the clutch pin replacing the locking pin, situated in the middle of the reverse. No measurements on this pin are provided, but again, but one of the photographs is provided with coins (a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin) for scale. (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/original-cairo-made-fnfl-badge-1915140208) Obverse of an enamel pin identified by the eBay seller as a 13th Demi-Brigade of the Foreign Legion, and identified as a Cairo-made example by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay, The seller states that the "13th Demi-Brigade of Foreign Legion was created in 1940, and, with the Senegalese Tirailleur Regiment of Tchad, one of the two regiments which rallied as a constituted unit of the Free French Forces (FFL)." Two additional photos accompany this auction list, one illustrates the unmarked reverse showing the location of 2 pins at both lateral ends of the pin and the other showing the obverse in comparison with a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin for scale. (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cairo-made-badge-free-french-13e-1915136126) Obverse of an enameled pin identified by the seller as an insignia for the Régiment de Tirailleurs du Cameroun, made in Cairo by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. The seller includes the Wikipedia information that: "This Free French regiment existed from 1940 to 1944 and participated in the following actions according to the French Wikipedia: The Battle of Bir Hakim; The Campaign in Gabon and the Campaign in Syria." The two addition photos that accompany this auction listing show the unmarked reverse showing the location of the pin (slightly more superior than the middle of the pin, and showing the scar from replacing the locking pin with a clutch pin) and the obverse in comparison with a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin for scale. (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/original-cairo-made-ffl-regiment-de-1915137548) Obverse of a pin identified by the seller as for ambulance chirurgicale légère, of the Free French Forces, made in Cairo by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. A photo of the unmarked reverse in the auction listing shows the showing the location of the 2 pins (at the superior and inferior ends of the piece, and showing the scar from replacing the locking pins with a clutch pins) and the obverse in comparison with a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin for scale. (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cairo-made-badge-ambulance-1915137854) Obverse of an enamel pin identified by the eBay seller as an insignia for the 4e Régiment de Tirailleurs Sénégalais made in Cairo by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. The two other photos include in the auction listing show the unmarked reverse showing the location of the pin (in the middle of the pin, and showing the scar from replacing the locking pin with a clutch pin) and the obverse in comparison with a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin for scale. (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cairo-made-badge-4e-regiment-de-1915138513) Examples of some of the South African Air Force stick pin insignia for various squadrons that were made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay in Cairo, of the kind mentioned by the seller of the above FFL pins, are shown in low-resolution illustrations, but with good identifications, on the MP Antique et Militaria website (http://www.militaria.qc.ca/air-force/south-africa.html). The same seller of the above eBay Fahmy Tewfik Bichay FFL pins also listed this example on an undated past eBay auction that is archived on the WorthPoint.com website. This is stated in the auction listing to be copy of a pin insignia of a: "Free French 1ére Compagnie de Chausseurs Parachutists badge that was made during the Second World War in Cairo, Egypt by Maison Tewfik Bichay. This particular badge was made by Fahmy T. Bichay using the company's original dies in 1977 at the request of a collector." The description identifies the mark on the reverse "R 77" as having been placed there by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay to mark this piece (and others?) as modern replica(s) of a genuine WWII pins. The seller did not know how many such copies may have been made by Bichay. (From: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cairo-made-copy-1ere-compagnie-de-1915140395). Reverse of the same replica of a FFL Parachutist pin showing the "R 77" mark identified as a mark used by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay to indicate this was a replica of a pin manufactured from the original dies in 1977. The dimensions of this pin are not given, but again the seller has included a photo of the obverse with a US 25¢ piece and a 1€ coin for scale.
  6. The above engraving of a session of the Mixed Courts is from: L’Illustration, No 2778, 23 May, 1896, pg 429. The article describing this session of the Mixed Court of Cairo is on pg. 436 of this same volume of L’Illustration. The engraving is based on a drawing by P. D. Philippoteaux, whose signature (as M. Philippoteaux) appears in the lower left corner. Paul Dominique Philippoteaux (1846-1923) is best remembered for a cyclorama of the Battle of Gettysburg, depicting Pickett’s charge. He also was the illustrator for engravings made for Jules Vernes’ 1877 Novel Off on a Comet(French title: Hector Servadac).The signature of the engraver, H. Thiriat, is in the lower right. Henri Amédée Thiriat (1843-1926) made press engravings for several venues, but spent most of his career working at L’Illustration. He experimented with a number of novel engraving techniques, produced one of the first uses of photography in a photo-engraving press image for L’Illustation in 1891, and adapted a similgravure technique on laminated wood. This version is scanned from an original library copy of this French news journal and can be zoomed for greater detail. Scans of this engraving are available online from agefotostock.com (https://www.agefotostock.com/age/en/Stock-Images/french-judge.html?query=french+judge&page=3) and gettyimages.com. The event described in the story is that of complaints by several European powers, led by France, of using Egyptian funds to finance Britain’s invasion to retake the Sudan a decade after the humiliating loss to Mahdist forces in 1884-1885. Britain authorized an expedition to Dongola in March 1896, following the defeat of Italian forces in the Battle of Adwa. France, Italy, Germany all had interests in the area, and Britain sought the recapture of the Sudan to shore up the Anglo-Egyptian rule and thwart the political interests of other European powers. Some European Commissioners had objections to the ”casual” authorization of the use of 500,000 pounds from the Egyptian Debt Fund on March 26, 1896 to fund the expedition to Dongola. The L’Illustration article specifically mentions objections by the French and Russian Commissioners (although representing a minority of the Commissioners), who brought their complaint against the Egyptian government (run by the British) before the Mixed Courts. The article states that the decision about the case was scheduled to be given by 1 June, 1896. The Illustration of the court hearing of the case; “The trial brought by France against the Egyptian debt - a meeting of the Mixed Tribunal” is identified as taking place during one of the hearings on this case in the Mixed Court of Cairo. The description of the illustration on page 436 of this issue also states that the slogan “Justice is the basis of government” is inscribed on the distinctive insignia of the magistrates, and on the wall of the courtroom behind the judges. It describes their costume as the tarbush, stambouline, and a red silk sash, noting that the Advocate (lawyer) General and Registrar (greffier) wear a sash of red and green. It identifies the individuals in the engraving as: The President of the Cairo court, M. Pruniéres (France), is seated at the center of the 5 individuals at the horseshoe-shaped bench, with the judges to his right M. Stopelaar (Holland) and Ismail Bey Serrie (Egypt) and those to President Pruniéres' left are Judges M. de Sande e Castro (Portugal) and Aziz Bey Youssef (Egypt). At the far right of the engraving is Emin Bey Galli, deputy head of the prosecutor’s office, in the seat of the public prosecutor. The standing lawyer at the bar is M. Padoa wearing the lawyer’s berets (cap), rabat (scarf), robe, and épitoge. Seated to his right at the bar are M. de Rocca-Serra (French) wearing a tarbush; M Figari (Italy) the lawyer for the Egyptian government wearing a lawyers scarf and robe; and M. Carton de Wiart (Belgium) wearing a lawyer’s scarf and robe, a biretta rests on the bar between Carton de Wiart and Fiagari. Two lawyers shown to M. Padoa’s left (slightly behind him) are M. Babled (France) wearing a lawyer’s biretta, scarf and robe; M. Athanassaki (Greece), getting up or sitting down wearing a lawyer’s scarf and robe but no biretta, and M. Privat (France) wearing a lawyer’s biretta, scarf and robe. I have found photos and brief biographies for Casimir Pruniere and Albert Padoa Bey in the 50thanniversary of the Mixed courts publication (Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926), but not any information about the other individuals shown in this engraving. A photo of Casimir Pruniéres in the section of the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume picturing former presidents of the Mixed District Court of Cairo (pg. 47), identifying his tenure as president during 1885-1906. Pruniéres also is mentioned in Khedive Abbas Hilmi II’s autobiography (1999. The Last Khedive of Egypt: Memoirs of Abbas Hilmi II. Translated and edited by Amira El-Azhary Sonbol, Ithaca Press, Reading) as a former professor of his and man he greatly respected for his dedication to Egypt. Photo of Albert Padoa Bey from a section of the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume identifying his term as Bâtonnière (head) of lawyers on the Egyptian bar for the Mixed Courts during 1885-1887, page 208.
  7. I am currently enjoying my 2nd week of quarantine here in Toulouse, France. While I have plenty of professional data entry I am doing on some of my information from my anthropological fieldwork in Venezuela with Savanna hunter-gatherers, there is also time to catch up on some of my other pedantry- This is a follow-up to my post on this thread of 31 January, 2020 about the anomalous engraving on the gold and blue enameled arms of two examples of breast stars of the Order of Ismail (on a 1st Class Grand Cordon set and the other a 2nd Class Grand Officer set). In that post, I included a moderate resolution image of the neck badge (along with the breast star) of the Grand Officer set with this unusual engraving from an illustration on Hassan Kamal-Kelisi’s Morali’s flickr photostream and noted that the same image appeared in three separate listings of La Galerie Numismatique auctions in 2013 that are archived on the Liveauctioneers.com website. I also noted in my 31 January post that these are some of the most commonly downloaded and re-posted images of the Order of Ismail, despite the very anomalous engraving on the gold floral design elements on the gold and blue enamel arms of the star (and that I also had inadvertently used them as exemplars of the 2nd Class Grand Officer award in my posts here: the 6th photo in my post of 13 November, 2017, and the 2nd photo of my post of 3 December, 2018). I posted the photos associated with those 3 auctions March, June, and September 2013 La Galerie Numismatique auctions (where this set was not purchased on any of the 3 auctions) in my post of 2 February, 2020 on this thread. I have reviewed the best higher-resolution images of sash and neck badges that I have found, principally on auction sites that show relevant variation in the execution of the engraving and some additional design aspects worth noting. I have not encountered another example of a sash badge or neck badge with this unusual form of engraving on the gold floral design elements of the five star arms. I have seen some slight variation in the more common style of engraving that I wish to detail below. I have previously included some of these images, but there are some design variations that I did not appreciate previously about several of these examples. The only other significant variations that are evident in this regalia are shown below on: 1). The form of the wreath of one 1st Class Grand Cordon sash badge example made by Tewfik Bichay that also is the same as that on the first image below of the La Galerie Numismatique Grand Cordon set with anomalous engraving (the 3rd-to-last image in this post); that same wreath configuration is also oddly present on a neck badge example otherwise attributed to J. Lattes manufacture (4th-to-last photo on this post); and as one unattributed neck badge with the same form of wreath (shown in the 5th-to-last photo of this post); 2). the photos of a 3rd Class Commander neck badge example made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay that were provided by Owain in his post of 5 April, 2018 on this thread (the 2nd & 3rd images of his post showing the obverse of this neck badge) that shown are shown here as the 2nd-to-last photo of this post. Neck badge of a set (including the neck badge with ribbon and breast star, but no case) identified as a Lattes-made Order of Ismail 2nd Class Grand Officer from three La Galerie Numismatique auction listings of 4 March, 2013 (Lot 0185); 24 June, 2013 (Lot 0442); 21 September, 2013 (Lot 0300); Archived on the Liveauctioneers website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/18004070_order-of-ismail). Each of these listed lots was passed each time. Identical information and photos were in each listing. The neck badge is identified as measuring 60 mm (no height given) and weighing 48.6 g. The breast star’s measurement is listed as 70 mm (diameter) and its weight as 81.25 g. These measurements are consistent with those given for other Grand Officer sets. Both pieces are noted as hallmarked, however the hallmarks are not identified. A photo of the reverse of both the neck badge and the breast star shows the “LATTES” name maker’s mark. The position of the three Egyptian gold hallmarks are in the usual position below the Lattes name, but the photo resolution is too poor to distinguish them and identify the date hallmark. This is currently the only photo I have encountered of this unusual form of engraving on the gold floral elements on any sash badge or neck badge. I included an uncropped version of this image (showing the whole neck ribbon) as the 1st photo in my post of 2 February 2020 and an image of the reverse of this sash badge and associated breast star as the 2nd photo in that post, in a follow-up to the 31 January discussion of the anomalous engraving seen on 2 Order of Ismail breast star examples. See my description detailing what is odd about this engraving in the first 4 paragraphs and first 3 photos of the 31 January, 2020 post and the discussion of other variation on the breast stars in that post (all relevant to these images posted here as well). The anomalous engraving on the above example is nearly identical to that seen in the Grand Cordon and Grand Officer set discussed in the 31 January post. The only noticeable differences are: 1) the base of the stems for the central dual flowers of the neck badge is a circle with a circular dimple, rather than an ovate form with a oval dimple 2) there are no interior lines on the 2 stems of those 2 central flowers distal of the basal round design element, unlike both the Fritz Rudolf Künker anomalously engraved example and the breast star associated with this neck badge shown in the La Galerie Numismatique illustrations. This difference is probably only because of the smaller size of the arms on the neck badge than on the two breast stars. One aspect of this I did not mention in my 31 January post about this odd engraving on the breast stars is that the lines appear thinner and look as though they are cast or formed with an electric engraving tool into the gold floral decorations of the arms rather than being engraved with hand scribes in the same way as the Lattes and Tewfik Bichay examples look. The high resolution image of the Fritz Rudolf Künker example in the 1st photo of my 31 January, 2020 post (that can be zoomed for better detail) shows this much better than the La Galerie Numimatique example here or in that post. The other significant difference seen in this example (compared with most Lattes examples) is the form of the wreath forming the outer border of the central calligraphic boss of the medallion. This exhibits a configuration seen only in one 3rd Class neck badge attributed to Lattes from an eMedals auction of 23 July, 2019 (Item M0306-1) and on the sash badge and breast star of a 1st Class Grand Cordon example made by Tewfik Bichay from a Fall 2014 Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG auction. Both of those examples are illustrated below in this post. The gold dot fruits of the wreath are present in different numbers and configurations than on all other Lattes examples (but identical to the 2 examples just mentioned). The thinner and less evenly executed gold margins of the gold and red band design elements around the wreath also do not match most Lattes examples, but are the same as the odd eMedals neck badge attributed to Lattes, and the Tewfik Bichay (shown in the 15th and 16th photos below in this post). Additionally, the leaves of the wreath are formed slightly differently than the other Lattes examples and appear to be covered with a thinner and less deeply emerald-colored green enamel than on any other Lattes-made Order of Ismail regalia. I noted in my post of 31 January, 2020 that some genuine Lattes breast stars appear to have a similar configuration of the gold fruit dots in the wreath to those on the anomalously engraved La Galerie Numismatique example shown in the 3rd photo of my 31 January post (and the image of that same breast star form Hassan Kamal-Kelisi Morali’s flickr site shown as the 2nd photo of that post), but not to the anomalous configuration of the Künker Auction 331, Lot 1074 30 January 2020 auction shown in the 1st photo of my 31 January post. It appears that the 4th Class Knight chest badges made by Lattes do show some of these same differences in the distribution of the gold dot fruits, having the gold and red enamel bands appearing to have thinner gold margins and narrow channels for the red enamel. I am reviewing the fewer auction site photos I have of 4th Class badges, and expect to have shorter contribution on those design variations here soon. Given the size differences of the Knights’ chest badge (usually reported to be between 54-55 mm wide in diameter), it is unclear whether their wreaths could have been used on any sash or neck badges as replacement or repair components. The anomalous engraving on the arms of the star of this piece (and its associated breast star) and the unusual wreath configuration (also present on the breast star of this set that I discussed in my post of 31 January, 2020) may further support the notion that this is a chimeral construction of Lattes, Tewfik Bichay, and possibly some other source for the unusual form of engraving seen on the gold and blue enamel star arms. The number of anomalies in this set strongly suggests to me it is not a genuine variant from the J. Lattes workshop. This is a very high-resolution photo of an Order of Ismail neck badge from a 16 April, 2017 auction by Bukowskis (https://www.bukowskis.com/en/lots/906427-the-order-of-ismail-nischan-al-ismail-22k-gold-lattes-in-kairo-1928-1928-weight-ca-47-g). It is not identified whether this is a 3rd Class Commander neck badge or an isolated neck badge from a 2nd Class set. The measurements provided for this badge are 8.5 cm high (“from the loop” which I unsure if it means including the most distal portion of the suspension loop, and not from the crescent and star portion of the crown design) x 6 cm wide. Photos of the reverse show the "LATTES" maker’s mark, and the 3 Egyptian gold hallmarks in their normal position for Lattes examples. The date hallmark is “D”=1929-1930. This image can be zoomed for excellent detail of the design of this neck badge. I previously illustrated a cropped close-up of the crown suspension device of this piece as the 10th photo of my post of 22 February, 2019 on this thread. The 1st photo of my post of 26 February 2019 shows a closer cropped image of that crown suspension device from this neck badge (for comparison with a named 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail badge with a poorly made replacement crown suspension replacement). The distal flower shows 3 engraved lines on each of the lateral side of the flower and a single engraved line within the central petal portion of this flower. The proximal origin point of the 2 central flowers is a round gold outline and this high resolution image shows a triangular punch mark as the engraving (this level of detail is not visible in any other image of a neck or sash badge shown in this post) and 2 straight lines are engraved in the stems touching or almost touching the most proximal of the 3 lateral lines on each of the 2 central flowers. The distal end of each of these flowers has a more medially oriented engraved line. Some examples shown below have 2 thin engraved lines that isolate the central petal of each of these 2 central flowers, but that is less common than the form seen on this neck badge. The lowest central portion of the proximal “leaf” motif nearest the wreath frame of the central medallion is a singly engraved line. Note that the minor variations in the engraved design shown here (an din my post of 31 January about the breast stars) may emphasize that these have been engraved with hand-held scribes rather than either cast or engraved with an electrical tool to This photo, and especially the next close-up image of the central medallion of this same badge, show the configuration of the wreath design very clearly and in great detail. The distribution and number of gold fruit dots in the wreath is the common form for almost all Lattes 1stClass sash badges, and the 2nd and 3rd Class neck badges. The gold and red enamel bands around the wreath show even and robust gold margins, and a wider central channel for the red enamel than seen on the La Galerie Numismatique example above. This image, and then next close-up also show the thickness of the emerald green enamel and the depth of its coloration, in contrast with the La Galerie Numismatique example above and the other design differences from (but also seen in the anomalous wreath on the eMedals Item M0306-1 Lattes neck badge from the 23 July, 2019 auction, the unattributed neck badge of the Hassan Kamal Kelisi’s flickr photostream 3rd Class Commander neck badge, and the Tewfik Bichay made 1st Class Grand Cordon sash badge from a Fall 2014 Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG auction, all shown below in this post). Very-high resolution close up image of the central medallion of the same J. Lattes made Order of Ismail neck badge from the 16 April, 2017 auction by Bukowskis as shown above. This image also can be zoomed for even greater detail. This shows quite well the number and distribution of the gold fruit dots in the wreath around the central inscription of “Ismail” on the medallion central boss. It also provides excellent detail on the design and execution of the gold and red enamel bands around the wreath, the form of the leaves in the wreath, and the rich color and depth of the green enamel of the wreath. Because there is a comparably high-resolution image of the wreath of an Order of Ismail breast star, I am including it here to show the different configuration of the gold fruit dots on the Lattes breast stars. This example is from a 6 April, 2017 auction by Bukowskis (https://www.bukowskis.com/en/lots/906427-the-order-of-ismail-nischan-al-ismail-22k-gold-lattes-in-kairo-1928-1928-weight-ca-47-g). Although the class of this breast star is not identified, the diameter measurement is given as 7 cm, indicating it is a 2nd Class Grand Officer breast star. This form is consistent with the majority of Lattes-made examples in my post of 31 January, 2020This particular breast star is illustrated as the photo in that 31 January post. I have previously included this image as the 2nd photo in my post of 2 November 2018 on this thread. The most readily identifiable difference between the Lattes made breast star and the sash and neck badges wreath configuration is the 7 gold dot fruits and their arrangement in the inferior panel of this breast star at the point where the 2 wreath branches cross, compared with 9 dots on the Lattes sash and neck badges with a different configuration. The lower right side panel of the Bukowskis breast star has 14 gold fruit dots while the Bukowskis neck badge has 13. The other panels all exhibit the same number of gold fruit dots in each panel: the upper right has 13; the upper left of each as 13; and the lower left has 13 (although in the above photo of the wreath on the Bukowskis neck badge, the gold fruit dot of this lower left panel that is most near the lower exterior frame margin of the wreath, next to the gold and red enamel band is covered by green enamel, other examples show that this is a 13thfruit dot; for example, in the Spink & Son, Lot 319 example shown below that can be zoomed, this gold fruit dot is visible with less enamel covering). Although the number of gold fruit dots is the same in each of these panels, except the most inferior central and lower right ones, their placement is slightly different between the neck badge and breast star. There is a single gold fruit dot in the most superior portion of the wreath of the Bukowski breast star, between the uppermost gold and red enamel bands. This can be seen on some of the examples shown in my post of 31January, 2020, although the eMedals breast star example in the 7thphoto of that post appears to have deeper enamel covering this feature. Above is a very high-resolution image of an Order of Ismail Lattes-made neck badge from a Fritz Rudolf Künker auction of 4 October, 2014 (Action 253, Lot 1513) that is archived on the acsearch.info webiste (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=2146041). The auction description identifies this as a 3rd Class Commander neck badge, states that the reverse is marked with a Lattes maker’s mark, a Cairo assay office mark for “750” gold (18 karat), the “bird” (ibis” mark used prior to 1946), and a date hallmark of “A” for 1926 (1925-1926). I previously illustrated this neck badge as the 2nd photo in my post of 31 October, 2018 on this thread. The description notes the presence of the Cairo assay office hallmark on the reverse of the crown suspension device and attachment ring, and the ibis hallmark on the suspension ring. No photos of the reverse are present in the auction listing. This Commander neck badge shows the common form of the engraving of the gold floral elements on this regalia element, with one notable variation. Note that the most distal flowers exhibits 3 lateral marks on each side of the centerline (seen in several other Lattes examples) and a unique oval terminus of the central petal. This distal loop in the terminal flower is not seen on any other high-resolution photos of Lattes neck or sash badges I have seen from auction site listings. The basal portion of the 2 central flowers is a circle (not the lozenge-shape seen on the breast stars) and there are no lines in the 2 stems distal of the basal point for the flower stems. The engraved lines are quite graceful in this example. Although the engraved loop line of the central petal and the lack of size graduation of the 3 lateral engraved lines of this distal flower are different from the La Galerie Numismatique example that also is hallmarked "A" (shown in the next photo of this post), the beauty of the engraving of these 1925-1926 examples from the J. Lattes workshop is noteworthy. The wreath on sash badges (1st Class) and neck badges (2nd Class and 3rd Class) band sash badges made by Lattes show a different distribution of the gold dot fruits than on the 1st Class Grand Cordon and 2nd Class Grand Officer breast stars. On the above example, the wreath configuration is the most commonly seen pattern on these J. Lattes sash and neck badges. The pattern of the gold dot fruits of the wreath surrounding the inscribed central medallion is the pattern seen most examples with attributions to Lattes. The gold and red enamel bands of the wreath have a relatively thick, though very even, definition and the area between the margins with red enamel is somewhat wider than in the above La Galerie Numismatique piece’s bands around the wreath. Order of Ismail neck badge from a 19 April, 2017 auction by La Galerie Numismatique, archived on thesaleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/numismatique/catalogue-id-la-gal10005/lot-a3c25951-5f0d-4f3b-bc2b-a74500e2796a), Auction 33, lot 721. This high resolution image can be zoomed for good detail of the engraving and details of the wreath element. The original image on thesaleroom.com website can be enlarged for a much clearer view of the engraving than this version I was able to download. I have not previously included this photo on GMIC, but I did previously include an image of the reverse of this badge as the 17th photo in my post of 11 January, 2019 showing the "LATTES" name and the 3 Egyptian hallmarks. The date hallmark on this piece is "A"=1925-1926. The auction description identifies this neck badge as 81 mm (high) x 62 mm (wide) with a weight of 47.8 g. The description identifies this as a 3rd Class Commander neck badge. No case is associated with this offering. The engraving of the gold floral decorations of the arms shows 3 lateral engraved marks on each side of the terminal flower and a single engraved line in the central petal. Each of the central 2 flowers have 3 engraved lines on their lateral sides and a single engraved line coming off of the uppermost lateral engraving into the most medial petal of each flower. The 3 lateral lines of each of the 5 most distal terminal flowers' lateral margins show a gracefully executed gradual increase in sized from the most proximal to distal set that adds an elegance not seen in other examples of engraving on these pieces. The proximal origin point of these 2 central flowers has a single engraved line running distally toward the separation of the gold outline of the 2 central flowers. There are no lines within the individual stems on these 2 central flower elements. The proximal central "bud" where the basal leaves originate has a single engraved line running distally. The engraved curling lines of the leaves are particularly lively in their execution on this piece, with elegant curls at their terminations. The engraving is not completely "perfect", but it exhibits a compositional care and grace. Overall, the engraving on this particular neck badge is very beautifully and carefully done. The eMedals neck badge example shown below in the 13th photo of this post (with a date hallmark also of "A"), may exhibit similar balance in the engraving, but the resolution of that photo is not good enough be certain. Details of the higher resolution image of the "LATTES" maker's mark, the Egyptian gold hallmarks, and scratches on the reverse (included with the auciton listings of each of these badges) make it appear that these are not the same pieces (although the lighting on those reverse images is quite different). The engraving may look similar for being the work of the same artisan, but without a better image of the eMedals neck badge that is just speculation. The wreath margin of the central inscribed medallion boss is the usual form seen of the gold dot fruit distribution for most Lattes examples, and this photo shows that pattern well. The gold and red enamel bands around the wreath have even, robust margins and the red enamel space is the same proportion seen in most of the images in this post. There is no overflow of any red enamel at the crossing points of any of the bands High-resolution image of an Order of Ismail neck badge from a 19 November, 2015 auction by Spink & Son, Lot 319) archived on the saleroom website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/spink/catalogue-id-srspi10063/lot-27ae7624-fe96-4fb4-baab-a53f010b1400). The auction listing states this example is a 3rd Class Commander made by Lattes (neck badge and ribbon only, it is not associated with a case), its measurements are given as 78 mm (high), including the crown suspension, x 61 mm (wide), and has a date hallmarked 1924 (date hallmark not shown). No photo of the reverse is provided in the auction listing. I have not illustrated this example before on GMIC. This example varies from the above Fritz Rudolf Künker neck badge in having only 2 lateral engraved marks on the terminal flower design element and a single straight line within the petal terminus rather than the unusual oval outline of the Künker example. It also has a more straight-line engraving in the basal origin of the stems of the 2 central floral design elements and has thin lines within each of those stems. The middle 2 flowers exhibit an additional engraved line; there are the 3 engraved lines on each flower’s medial side, and then 2 lines appear to outline the central petal (especially visible on the 2 central flowers of the lower right arm of the star). The curls of the engraving of the basal “leaf” elements at the portion of the arm closest to the central medallion frame, and those sweeping down from the terminal distal flower exhibit less tight a curl and a lack of a terminal punch dot than the Künker badge shows. Overall, the feel of this engraving is less flowing, in my idiosyncratic artistic view, than that seen on the Künker neck badge. This photo shows particularly well the distribution of the gold dot fruits in the wreath compared with any other images I have encountered. They show the same patters as on the other Lattes examples (except the eMedals Item M0306-1 shown below) and the Künker neck badge. There appears to be some spillover of the red enamel at the points where the bands cross, and perhaps this makes the gold margins of the crossed bindings of the wreath around the central inscribed medallion appear thinner than on the Künker badge. High-resolution image of a 2nd Class Grand Officer neck badge illustrated on the Stacks Bower’s Gallery auction of 15 November, 2012 that is archived on Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/298433912792222444/?nic=1) and also on the acsearch.info website (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=1430371). The acsearch.info listing shows this set as a neck badge without ribbon and breast star, and is associated with a leather covered case measuring 9 ½ inches long x 4 ¾ inches wide x 2 ¼ inch tall). I previously included this image from the Pinterest website as the 1st photo in my post of 22 April, 2018 and the breast star of this set as the 2nd photo in that post on this thread, both to show the engraving of the floral elements on the gold and blue enameled arms of the star elements of each. I also included this neck badge photo as the 1st image on my post of 19 October, 2019 on this thread also to illustrate the engraving on the gold floral designs on the gold and enamel decoration of the neck badges and breast star of the Order of Ismail (and the associated breast star is shown in the 2ndphoto of that same post). The auction description identifies the dimensions of the (neck) badge as 78.3 (apparently mm, although the case dimensions were given in inches) x 51. 3 (mm) with a weight 0f 46.4 g. The height dimension is within the normal reported range, but the width is 10 mm smaller than the most commonly reported range of 60-62 mm. No dimensions of the breast star are given. Both pieces are identified as having date hallmarks of “C”=1928-1929. No photos of the reverse are provided, but the "LATTES" maker's mark is stated to be present. This photo shows that the engraving of the terminal flower has 3 engraving marks on each lateral side and a single line at the terminal petal. This example shows deeper terminal ends to the curling engraved lines within the basal ”leaf” designs and the curls sweeping from the terminal flower downwards toward the frame of the central medallion, more like the engraving on the Künker neck badge than the Spink & Son badge. The engraving is quite elegant and composed with a good sense of movement. The gold dots fruits in the wreath are the same as in the other examples, and the gold & red enamel bands are even and most like those on the Künker 2014 auction example. Above is a high-resolution image of a 2nd Class Grand Officer neck badge of the Order of Ismail that is from a 19 April, 2017 La Galerie Numismatique auction (https://www.coins-la-galerie-numismatique.com/auction-33-day-1/order-ismail), Auction 33, Lot 720. This photo can be zoomed for additional detail. This example is from a cased set awarded to Dr. Giovanni Quirico that includes the unfortunately mis-repaired breast star I most recently illustrated as the 6th photo in my post of 31 January, 2020 to show variation in engraving and the wreath element in the high resolution image of that breast star. I have not previously posted the above image here on GMIC because of the incorrect offset of the inscribed central boss, however this image is useful here as it shows the engraving and wreath configuration of this Lattes example quite well. I have previously illustrated this neck badge in its case with the breast star as the 4th photo of my post of 14 November, 2017, and the brevet and envelope of this set is shown in the 5th and 6th photos of that post on this thread. I also posted that same photo of this neck badge and associated breast star in their case as the 23rd photo in my post of 19 October, 2019. I illustrated a close-up image of hallmarks on the reverse of the suspension link between the superior arm of the star and the crown suspension device of this neck badge in the 11th photo in my post of 11 January, 2019, the hallmarks on the reverse of the suspension loop of this piece as the 12th photo in that post, in addition to images of the hallmarks on the tunic pin of the breast star of this set (my previous postings of photos of the breast star are references in the 31 January, 2020 post discussing the breast star). Photos of the reverse of this neck badge show the “LATTES” maker’s mark. The auction description identifies the neck badge as measuring 82 mm (high) x 62 mm (wide). This set has the award brevet and envelope addressed to “Dr. Giovanni Quirico, (Médecin de L. M. le Roi)”. The date hallmarks on the neck badge and breast star are “Z”=1924-1925. The engraving on this Grand Officer neck badge shows 2 engraving marks on each lateral side of the terminal flower and a straight line within the central petal. Both central flowers have 3 engraved marks on their lateral sides and the 2 engraved lines that outline the central petal on each of the central flowers. The proximal origin of the 2 central flowers is round with a horizontal or punched mark and there are lines within both stems that terminate as the lowest (most proximal) of the 3 lateral engraved marks in each of the central flowers. The most proximal central “bud” portion of the gold floral design where the basal leaves originate has amore robust engraving than on most examples, but I cannot determine whether it is a single or dual line. The wreath exhibits the normal Lattes configuration of gold fruit dots and the gold and red enamel bands around the wreath. These bands show overflow of the red enamel at each of the central crossing of the bands, and the channels with red enamel appear very full in this image. The central inscribed medallion boss shows it has been displaced, with the upper portion deflected to the viewer’s left, so that the central superior portion of calligraphic “Ismail” inscription is oriented to the ~11:00 rather than 12:00 position. Like the breast star of this set, this neck badge has had a few bad knocks, but remains a complete set in its case with the associated brevet. Moderate-resolution photo of a 2nd Class Grand Officer neck badge from a December, 2017 eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-ORDER-OF-THE-ISMAIL-2ND-CLASS-GRAND-OFFICER-ORIGINAL-CASE-RIBBON-RARE/222734299477?hash=item33dbffb155:g:5jQAAOSwQwBZkILL) of a cased set of the neck badge with ribbon and breast star, that does not appear to be archived any longer on the internet. I previously illustrated the reverse of this badge in the 23rd photo of my post of 11 January, 2019 on this thread, and included several images of this set my post of 19 October, 2019. I have not previously posted the above image from that eBay listing. Photos of the reverse show the "LATTES" maker's marks on the neck badge and breast star. I included photos of hallmarks on the reverse of the breast star of this set as the 21st-22nd photos in my 11 January, 2018 post. I illustrated the case lid for this set as the 17th photo in my post of 19 October, 2019. I included 2 images of the neck badge and breast star in the medal bed of their case as the 18th-19th photos of that same post; a close-up of the neck badge in the medal bed as the 20th photo (not showing the design details as well as the above image); a close-up of the breast star in the medal bed as the 21st photo; and an image of the decorated push release catch on the case as the 22nd photo in that same post of 19 October, 2019. The reverse of this neck badge has a date hallmark of “Z”, indicating assay evaluation of 1924-1925 (23rd photo of my post of 11, January, 2019, with the same date hallmark on the associated breast star of this set). The engraving on the arms shows 2 engraved lines on the lateral margins of the most distal terminal flower on each arm flower and a straight line within the central petal of that flower. The middle 2 flowers do not appear to have the central petal isolated with 2 engraved marks, but look like those of the 2nd Class Grand Officer neck badge from the Stacks Bower’s Gallery auction of 15 November, 2012. This example has a straight horizontal engraved line in the slightly oval base of the 2 central flowers proximal origin point, and there are separate engraved lines in each of the stems of those 2 flowers. The wreath configuration is normal for Lattes examples (exhibiting the same gold dot fruit distribution, the relatively broad and even gold margins of the gold and red binding decorative elements of the wreath, and the leaves form and deep emerald coloring of the enamel). There may be some overflow of the enamel at the crossing points of the bindings, but it is very hard to tell because of the lower resolution of these photographs. A high-resolution image of a sash badge of a 1st Class Grand Cordon set from a 3 April, 2018 auction of La Galerie Numismatique (https://www.coins-la-galerie-numismatique.com/auction-xxxviii-day-1/order-ismail), Lot 560 that also is archived on the Live Auctioneers website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/60483636_order-of-ismail). I included this image as the 3rd photo of my post of 22 February, 2019, along with other images from the LiveAuctioneers archived listing. Those included: the Grand Cordon set in its case (1st photo), the sash badge and breast star against the partially laid out sash (2nd photo), images of the reverse of the sash badge (4th photo), a close up of the hallmarks on the reverse of the crown suspension device and suspension loop (5th photo), the hallmarks on the reverse of the suspension link between the sash badge superior star arm and the crown suspension device (6th photo), a close-up of the Lattes maker’s mark and the three Egyptian gold hallmarks on the reverse of the sash badge (7th image) and an image of the breast star (8th photo) and its gold hallmarks on the reverse of one of the arms of the breast star (9th photo). I illustrated the obverse of this sash badge again as the 3rd photo in my post of January 15, 2020 (with an image of the cases sash badge, sash, and breast star as the 1stimage in that post; the semi-opened sash with sash badge and breast star as the 2nd photo [that 922F noted exhibited a British from of the decorative bow rather than the pinked bow margins seen on most Grand Cordon sashes of this award]; and the obverse of the breast star alone as the 4th photo). This cased set lacks only the award brevet. Photographs in the auction listing show the "LATTES" maker’s hallmark on the reverse of the sash badge. As noted in my previous posts, the sash badge has a date hallmark of “B”=1927-1928, and the breast star has a date hallmark of “C”=1928-1929. The dimensions of the sash bade are given as 85 mm (high) x 62 mm (wide). The above image of the sash badge shows the engraving on the floral elements particularly well, especially on the superior (12:00) position arm of the star. This shows the 3 lateral engraved marks of the distal flower and straight line in the central terminal petal. The 2 central flowers have 3 lateral engraved marks each and a single offset mark oriented to toward the terminus of the petals. The 2 central flowers are joined at the base by a circular origin point with a single straight line engraving, thickest at the basal most proximal portion, and no individual lines n each stem. All of the engraving marks on these 3 flowers are thickest at their “outside” margins (lateral and distal), likely showing the direction of their creation from the thicker initiation of a stylus mark toward the thinner termination. The gold dot fruits in the wreath have normal placement, and the red and gold binding elements have even gold margins with no spillover of the red enamel. Moderate resolution image of an Order of Ismail sash badge of a 1st Class Grand Cordon, from a past eMedals auction (https://www.emedals.com/egypt-order-of-ismail-w0269), Item W0269. This offering was the full sash & sash badge only, no breast star was associated with this Lot. I have previously illustrated this sash badge attached to the sash as the 3rd photo in my post of 13 November, 2017; the same image as above as the 4th photo in that post, and the reverse of this sash badge in the 5th photo of that post of 13 November, 2017. I included the image of this sash badge and sash as the 5th photo of my post of 15 January, 2020. The auction description identifies the badge measurement as 61.5 mm (wide) x 80 mm (high) inclusive of crown suspension. Illustrations of the reverse show the “LATTES” maker’s mark and the full set of Egyptian hallmarks in the usual position that identify the date as “A”=1925-1926. The above photo shows the use of 3 engraving marks on the most distal flower of each arm of the gold floral element (and a single straight line in the central terminal petal of that flower). The base of the origin for the 2 central flowers shows a straight line ascending from the most proximal portion of that circular distally in into the joint stem of the 2 central flowers, but no lines in each of the separate portions of those flower stems. This image shows the distribution of the gold dot fruits in the wreath quite well, exhibiting their normal distribution as seen on the other neck badge examples here. Also note some spillover of the red enamel of the crossing point of each binding design element on the wreath. The neck badge of an example from an eMedals auction (https://www.emedals.com/egypt-kingdom-an-order-of-ismail-in-gold-1st-class-commander-by-j-lattes-c-12400), Item EG814. This Lattes made example is identified as a 3rd Class Commander badge with its neck ribbon. I have previously illustrated several of the photos from this listing of the hallmarks on the reverse of this piece. The reverse neck badge showing the "LATTES" maker’s mark and the 3 Egyptian gold hallmarks is shown in the 14th photo of my post of 11 January, 2019 on this thread; the reverse of the crown suspension device with the Cairo office assay mark of 18 carat gold is shown in he 15th photo of that same post, and the 3 Egyptian gold hallmarks (and an addition non-Egyptian “585” gold assay mark, identifying 14 carat gold in conflict with Cairo assay office mark indicating determination of 18 carat gold) on the reverse of the suspension loop around the ribbon is shown in the 16th photo of that post (11 January, 2019). This neck badge is identified a 61 mm (wide) X 79.5 mm (high) including the crown suspension element, probably only to the distal portion of the crescent and star element. The date hallmark on the reverse is “A”=1925-26. The engraving of the most distal flower has 3 lateral engraved marks on each lateral side and a single engraved line at he distal petal. The line from the base of the 2 central flowers also is a straight line, either touching or almost touching the first (most proximal) of the 3 lateral engraved lines of each flower. As noted above in the discussion the Lattes neck badge from an April 2017 La Galerie Numismatique auction shown in the 6th photo of this post (also hallmarked "A"), this eMedals piece is quite similar in the details of the engraving and may exhibit some of the elegance seen in the engraving of that neck badge. The photo of the eMedals neck badge is not high enough resolution to determine whether these are the same pieces (although as noted above, associated images of the reverse at higher resolution appear to show differences). Given the comparable dates, these 2 pieces might be the work of the same very skilled engraver in the J. Lattes workshop. There may be some wear or damage to the crossings of the gold and red enamel wreath bindings in the 7:00 position, but no apparent runover of the red enamel outside of the even, gold margins of the binding design elements. There are no anomalies in the positions of the gold fruit dots in the wreath. Moderate-resolution photo of a cased example of a Lattes made 3rd Class Order Of Ismail neck badge from a 6 April, 2019 auction of Very Important Lot (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/egypt-ismail-order-nischan-al-ismail-3-class-175085), Lot (1027). The auction description states the measurements as 83 mm (high) x 61 mm wide and its weight is 49.0 g. Photos of the reverse show the "LATTES" maker's mark as does an image of the interior case lid. I illustrated this badge in its case as the 1st photo of my post of 18 April, 2019, the same image as above as the 2nd photo, the reverse of the badge as the 3rd photo, a detail of the obverse of the crown suspension device as the 4th photo, an image of the reverse of the crown suspension device as the 5th photo showing the positions of the Cairo assay office single hallmark on the reverse of the crown and the position of the 3 Egyptian gold hallmarks on the suspension loop, and then 2 additional images of the case in that same post. I illustrated this neck badge in its case (obverse) as the 13th image in my post of 19 October, 2019 and the reverse resting on the case as the 14th photo in that same post. The date hallmark on this piece is “A”=1925-1926. The oblique view provides the best image of the engraving and wreath design on this badge. The image on the Very Important Lot website is slightly higher-resolution when zoomed than this version I could download. The close up image of the obverse of the crown suspension device shows some details of the engraving on the terminal most distal flower on the gold floral design of the arm of the star (4thphoto of my 18 April, 2019 post). The engraving is best seen on the lower right (~2:30 position) and upper left (~9:30 position) arms. This neck badge has 3 lateral engraved lines on each side of the terminal flower and a straight engraved line in the central petal. Each of the 2 central flowers exhibits the 3 engraved lines on their lateral margins and the more medially oriented engraving at the distal end of each flower. In the slightly clearer website image it is clear that there are no lines running the whole length of each stem of these 2 central flowers. The origin point of these 2 flowers has a single engraved line running from the round proximal origin point of their stems distally almost to the point where the gold divides into each flower. The wreath exhibits the normal Lattes configuration of the gold fruit dots and the gold and red enamel bands around the wreath. There is no overflow of red enamel at the point where the bands cross. Image of a 1StClass Grand Cordon Order of Imsail sash badge from the 2006 JOMSA 54 (4): Fig 15, page 20 article on this award. It appears to show 3 lateral engraving marks on the terminal distal flower of each arm with a straight line centered within the central petal. The proximal origin point of the 2 central flowers appears to show a dot and single line running distally, without separate engraved lines in each stem of the 2 flowers. The form of the wreath exhibits the same form of gold fruit dots, the robustness of the gold and red enamel bands around the wreath as shown here for all examples of sash badges and the majority of the Lattes neck badge examples. An example from Hassan Kamal-Kelisi’s Morali’s flickr photostream (https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/3051549576) that is identified as a 3rdClass Commander neck badge. The manufacturer is not identified, and no image of the reverse is provided. There are a couple differences in the engraving on the gold floral designs on the arms of the star of this example, but it is the wreath that exhibits distinctive variation not seen in most badges attributed securely to J. Lattes workmanship. As can be seen below, there is a strong possibility that this may the work of Tewfik Bichay. The 2 photos below (a 3rd Class neck badge from a July 2019 eMedals auction, Item M0306-1; and the other a 1st Class sash badge from a Fall 2014 Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG auction, Lot 1512) show this form of the wreath better. The Künker example includes images of the Tewfik Bichay maker’s hallmark, the eMedals example (below) shows Lattes hallmarks on the reverse, but I wonder if the wreath could have been repaired using a replacement wreath from a Bichay piece. In the above photo from Hassan Kamal-Kelisi’s Morali’s flickr photostream the most proximal portion of the gold floral design near the medallion frame shows 2 lines inside the central “bud”-like point where the 2 basal leaves originate rather than a single engraved mark as seen on most examples. The round base where the 2 central flowers originate has a dot engraving and no lines in the stems of the two central flowers. The most proximal-lateral (basal) portion of each of the 2 central flowers have a curl defining the lower portion of the flower that is only seen in the La Galerie Numismatique example with the highly anomalous engraving shown as the first photo in this post. The most distal single terminal flower appears to have 2 engraved marks on each lateral side of the flower, but may have 2 engraved lines within just proximal of the definition of central terminal petal (possibly visible in the lower left 7:00 position arm of the star?). The wreath clearly exhibits an uncommon from of the number and distribution of the gold dot fruits in the wreath (although not as clearly visible as in the 2 examples below and the first example in this post of the unusual La Galerie Numismatique example), more slender, slightly uneven gold and red enamel bands on the wreath, an possibly. It is difficult to see the different leaf treatment and enamel appearance in this example, although it appears similar to the 2 below and the La Galerie Numismatique example wreath configuration. Lower-quality image of a 3rd Class Commander neck badge of the Order of Ismail from a 23 July, 2019 eMedals auction (https://www.emedals.com/egypt-kingdom-an-order-of-ismail-in-gold-i-class-commander-by-j-lattes-c-1924), Item M0306-1. I previously included several images of this neck badge in my post of 22 August, 2019 without noticing the anomalous wreath on this example. My 22 August post shows this same photo as the 1st photo. In that same post (22 August) an oblique view is the 2nd photo; the reverse of the neck badge is the 3rd photo; an oblique view of thre reverse is the 4th photo; and a close-up image of the reverse showing the Lattes makers mark and 3 Egyptian gold hallmarks is the 5th image. The photos of the reverse of this neck badge show the "LATTES" maker’s mark, normal placement of the Egyptian gold hallmarks for Lattes pieces, and a date hallmark of “Y”=1923-1924. This example exhibits 2 lateral engraved lines in the distal flower, and a single straight line within the central terminal petal. The 2 central flowers have the 2 lines that separate the middle petal in each. The more lozenge-shaped origin point for these 2 flowers have a horizontal line engraving, and there are separate lines form this running through the stems of each flower. The gold and red enamel bands of the wreath appear to the thinner and less even definition of the gold margins, similar to the configuration seen in the 1stexample shown in this post of the La Galerie Numismatique example with the anomalous engraving pattern of the gold floral embellishments. The distribution of the gold fruit dots on this example are somewhat different than those seen on the other examples shown here. The differences are not completely clear because of the lower resolution of this image, however they appear in different numbers and positions in each panel of the wreath compared with he other photos in this post. Additionally, the execution of the leaves in the wreath, and apparently the way they appear under the enamel coating (“shallower” than the visible depth and darker emerald color of the green enamel on other Lattes examples), are quite distinctly different than in all other Lattes examples. However, the form of this wreath (the thinner and slightly more irregular gold and red enamel bands on the wreath, the distribution of gold dot fruits, and the form of leaves and green enamel) all appear to be identical to the wreath shown in the Tewfik Bichay example of a 1st Class Grand Cordon sash badge from a 2014 auction by Fritz Rudolf Künker that is shown below (except for the orientation mis-configuration in the Künker example discussed below). Could this be an example where the central medallion has been replaced sometime after 1924 with a Tewfik Bichay example? Or is the wreath element from a Lattes made 4th Class Knight chest badges, that also commonly exhibit this form the gold fruit dots and the gold and red enamel binding decorations on their wreath components. Again, is the size of the wreath component from a Knight's badge equivalent so that it could be attached to a neck badge? This is a high-resolution image of a sash badge from a 1st Class Grand Cordon set (consisting only of the sash badge and breast star) from a Fall 2014 Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG auction (https://www.kuenker.de/img/00079/01512q00.jpg). I previously illustrated this example as the 3rd-to-last photo of my post of 11 January, 2019 (an image of the reverse of the sash badge and breast star is the 4th-to-last image in that post). I also posted the entire Künker image showing the obverse and reverse of both the sash badge and breast star as a single high–resolution image in the only photo of my post of 30 April, 2018. This set (Lot 1512) was made by Tewfik Bichay, photos of the reverse of the sash badge and breast star clearly show the Tewfik Bichay maker’s hallmark. The reverse of the sash bade has 2 hallmarks below the Tewfik Bichay, at a slight angle downwards to the right compared with those seen on Lattes examples, and only the Cairo office gold assay of 18 carat and date hallmark are present on the reverse of the central boss. A single hallmark is present on the right side reverse of the Crown suspension device (even in this high resolution image I cannot unambiguously determine which hallmark that may be) and 2 hallmarks are present on the reverse of the suspension loop (the Cairo office 18 carat hallmark and a date hallmark). The auction description identifies the date hallmark as “D”=1929-1930. However, It is unclear to me if this is a “D” hallmark or an Arabic letter for a date between 1940 and 1951. At the time I posted this image, I did not notice a couple of repair anomalies apparent in the central medallion (in addition to being oblivious to the differences in the wreath compared with Lattes examples). Note that the gold and enamel wreath has been rotated incorrectly so that the inferior panel with the crossed branches (6:00 position) is now in a slightly offset orientation (7:00 position), to the viewer’s left from its correct orientation. It appears there also is some slippage of the central calligraphic boss medallion toward the viewer’s left so that it is not centered on its gold mount border element correctly. It also is apparent there is some enamel loss on part of two of the bands around the wreath (the interior right side of that in the ~2:00 position and the interior right portion of the band in the ~4:00 position). All of this suggesting this sash badge has been damaged and either repaired inexpertly or the wreath and central calligraphic medallion boss are both loose. The distribution of the gold dot fruits in the wreath are dissimilar to the illustrated Lattes example shown in this post, but are identical to those seen in the eMedals 3rd Class Commander neck badge example from the 23 July, 2019 auction (Item: M0306-1) shown above. The bands of the wreath also have thinner and slightly more uneven gold margins than the other Lattes examples. Also like the eMedals example above, the execution of the leaves and green enamel is distinctly different than the other Lattes examples shown here. The breast star of this set also shows these same differences in the form of the wreath compared with Lattes examples. photo by Owain Raw-Rees The only other significant variation that can be documented here is the above form of the example illustrated by Owain in his post of the photos of 5 April, 2018 on this thread. He has illustrated this cased example of a 3rd Class Commander neck badge made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. The case is marked Tewfik Bichay, and the maker’s mark on the reverse of the neck badge is that of Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. Owain illustrated this in excellent detail with images of the obverse that can be zoomed in the 2nd & 3rd photos of his post about this neck badge. What is most noticeable immediately is the lack of any engraving on the gold floral elements of the gold and blue enamel arms of the star. I don’t know if because of the lighting the blue enamel appears darker than on many Order of Ismail awards, but it is noticeably dark in this example. The Tewfik Bichay sash badge from the Fall 2014 Fritz Rudolf Künker auction shown above may also exhibit a darker blue enamel compared with the Lattes examples, but of course this could be due to lighting of the photograph. The finials at the end of each arm lack the round ball configuration and are simply round gold wells with a small amount of enamel that can be seen not to even fill the finial reservoirs entirely. This piece has a suspension ring connecting the superior arm to the crown suspension device rather than the more robust connections seen on Lattes and Tewfik Bichay examples. The wreath also is executed with much less detailed workmanship. The enamel on the leaves appears quite thin and the gold and red enamel bands around the wreath have very thin gold margins and apparently careless application of the red enamel. Overall, the enamel appears to have been a much thinner formula than on the Lattes and Tewfik Bichay examples. The information on this thread about shortages of materials and several necessary workshop improvisations that Fahmy Tewfik Bichay provided to 922f and 922F described in his posts (6 April, 2018 and 8 October, 2019 on this thread) is likely relevant to some of these design and material differences. I noted that the only other set I could find that show a Fahmy Tewfik Bichay maker’s mark also has this ring suspension between the superior star arm and the crown suspension device. The illustration of that set (shown below) is not high enough resolution to determine whether it also lacks engraving of the gold floral designs on the arms, but that appears likely to be the case, given what is visible in that photo. Low-resolution image of a 2nd Class Grand Officer set of the Order of Ismail made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. This image comes from a November 2012 auction by sixbid.com (https://www.sixbid.com/browse.html?auction=515&category=11656&lot=539476). I previously included this image on this thread as the 1st photo in my post of 5 December, 2017, and as the 2nd-to-last image in my post of 11 January, 2019. This photo can only be slightly zoomed, but not enough to resolve whether the design execution is similar to Owain's example above. This image does not clearly show any of the design details of obverse of these pieces. However, it does appear to show the lack of any engraving on the gold floral decorations of the star arms of the neck badge and breast star. The wreath apples to show the same thinner gold and red animal bands as seen on Owain's 3rd Class neck badge above. The color of the green enamel of the wreath also exhibits the lighter color seen on Owain's neck badge.
  8. Here are 2 additional miniature medals from a 16 July, 2019 auction by Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG (eLive auction 55, Lot 2828) that is archived on the acsearch.info website (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=6148390). Lot 2818 of this Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG July 2019 auction includes a miniature Persian Order of the Lion and the Sun and a miniature Egyptian Order of the Nile. The auction description identifies the Order of the Lion and the Sun as a 5th Class miniature made of silver and enamel, Order of the Nile mini as a 5th Class Knight, gold gilded with enamel. No dimensions are given for either medal, nor is there information on the manufacturers.
  9. I have found another image of one of the Order of Ismail miniatures that I illustrated in the 1st photo of my post of 10 November, 2018 on this thread. On 12 February, 2020 I illustrated the reverse (and obverse) of the 3rd Class Commander miniature in the 10 November, 2018 high resolution image (left image) of the obverse of two Order of Ismail miniatures. Below is the illustration of the reverse (and obverse) of the 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail miniature from that same photo (although in my post of 10 November, 2018 I mistakenly identified this mini as the 4th Class "Officer" rather than Knight mini). This comes from a listing of a 8 January, 2020 auction by Heritage Auctions Europe (lot 4593) that is archived on the on the-saleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/mpo/catalogue-id-mpo-mu10002/lot-e12f6a1a-b1cf-4f13-8be2-ab3600ab5f08). The same 3rd Class Commander Order of Ismail miniature I illustrated here on 12 February, 2020 from the Liverpool Medals auction also is archived here as Lot 4592 from the same Heritage Suctions Europe auction of 8 January, 2020. I am illustrating the 4th Class miniature bellow as another image documenting the reverse of the mini showing the same 2-part construction fairly well as shown for the 3rd class example shown above (12 February). I apologize for this duplicate post with the one on Owain's thread of "Miniatures of the Middle East & Arab World", but wanted to keep this Order of Ismail thread updated. Obverse and reverse of the same 4th Class Order of Ismail miniature as shown in the right image (obverse only) of the high-resolution miniature per I illustrated here on 10 November, 2018. Although the above image from the-saleroom.com archived listing of the Heritage Auctions Europe 8 January 2020 auction (Lot 4593) is not a high-resolution photo (as is the sixbid.com image shown in my 10 November, 2018 post), details of the rosette and ribbon show this is the same miniature medal. I also illustrated this same miniature as the 5th photo (a very-high resolution image that can be zoomed for excellent detail, also from the sixbid.com website) of my post of 18 December 2018. Note the prominent red thread attaching the central portion of the rosette, and the folds of the wrapping of the margins of the rosette in the 5:30 and 11:30 positions. Also note the identical position of the small tear or hole in the superior margin of the folded part of the ribbon.
  10. I have found another image of one of the Order of Ismail miniatures that I illustrated in the 3rd photo of my post of 10 November, 2018 on this thread. On 12 February, 2020 I illustrated the reverse (and obverse) of the 3rd Class Commander miniature in the 10 November, 2018 high resolution image (left image) of the obverse of two Order of Ismail miniatures. Below is the illustration of the reverse (and obverse) of the 4th Class Knight Order of Ismail miniature from that same photo (although in my post of 10 November, 2018 I mistakenly identified this mini as the 4th Class "Officer" rather than Knight mini). This comes from a listing of a 8 January, 2020 auction by Heritage Auctions Europe (lot 4593) that is archived on the on the-saleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/mpo/catalogue-id-mpo-mu10002/lot-e12f6a1a-b1cf-4f13-8be2-ab3600ab5f08). The same 3rd Class Commander Order of Ismail miniature I illustrated here on 12 February, 2020 from the Liverpool Medals auction also is archived here as Lot 4592 from the same Heritage Suctions Europe auction of 8 January, 2020. I am illustrating the 4th Class miniature bellow as another image documenting the reverse of the mini showing the same 2-part construction fairly well as shown for the 3rd class example shown above (12 February). Obverse and reverse of the same 4th Class Order of Ismail miniature as shown in the right image (obverse only) of the high-resolution miniature per I illustrated here on 10 November, 2018. Although the above image from the-saleroom.com archived listing of the Heritage Auctions Europe 8 January 2020 auction (Lot 4593) is not a high-resolution photo (as is the sixbid.com image shown in my 10 November, 2018 post), details of the rosette and ribbon show this is the same miniature medal. Note the prominent red thread attaching the central portion of the rosette, and the folds of the wrapping of the margins of the rosette in the 5:30 and 11:30 positions. Also note the identical position of the small tear or hole in the superior margin of the folded part of the ribbon.
  11. While I am on the J. Lattes shop in Cairo, I have a minor amount of information to add in my search to find out more about Lattes. I am constantly surprised that it is so difficult to find out very much at all about this man who is responsible for the fabrication of so many important and beautiful Egyptian awards! I have had much better luck finding out about the designer and several manufacturers of the Egyptian Mixed Courts' badges for judges and other court officials (that I have posted on my thread "Egyptian Khedivate Judge's Badge question" here on GMIC) than anything about J. Lattes. I apologize for cluttering up this thread with some non-medal information, but I am interested in looking for more background on this elusive jeweler. I recently found an example of a set of gold and turquoise cufflinks made by J. Lattes that are curated in the Hallwyl Museum in Stockholm Sweden. The reason this cased set of cufflinks is in the collection is because it was a gift to the husband of the woman who donated the building and its contents to the Swedish State as the initial basis of the material in the collections (http://hallwylskamuseet.se/en). The Hallwyl family obtained the cufflinks during a family tourism trip to Egypt. They left Sweden on 5 November, 1900, arriving in Port Said Egypt on 17 November and toured Egypt and the Sudan through 27 March, 1901 when they began the return journey to Sweden through Palestine (https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/wQzZaEl9). Color image from the Hallwyl Museum catalog of a set of cufflinks made by J. Lattes and purchased for Walther Von Hallwyll in Cairo as a Christmas present by his wife, Wilhelmina von Hallwyl (http://emuseumplus.lsh.se/eMuseumPlus?service=direct/1/ResultDetailView/result.tab.link&sp=10&sp=Scollection&sp=SelementList&sp=0&sp=0&sp=999&sp=SdetailView&sp=0&sp=Sdetail&sp=0&sp=F&sp=SdetailBlockKey&sp=5 ). The family spent Christmas Eve, 1900 in the Savoy Hotel, where they stayed throughout their visit in Cairo, which was when Wilhelmina von Hallwyl gave the J. Lattes cufflinks to her husband. These were purchased at the J. Lattes shop on El Manak Street (Sharia el Manak) in Cairo, probably on 22 December as Countess von Hallwyl and her female traveling companion visited markets, bazaars, and shops buying antiquity souvenirs, jewelry, and equipment for their upcoming Nile boat trip. This chain link backing-style cufflinks' materials are gold with green turquoise cabochon in both. They each individually weigh 3.7 g and measure: the gold & turquoise cufflink face each=1.4 cm long X 1.0 wide; and the fusiliform backings each=2.4 cm L X 0.05 cm wide. The catalog inventory number is: XXX:I:E.a.08. The brief mention of the J. Lattes shop in the Jeweler's Circular (that I've previously cited a couple times on this thread mentioning Egyptian jewelers in part II of an article by Chas Crossman begun on June 23, 1897 page 41, 44 that is continued on July 14, 1897 on pages 8-9) states that turquoise jewelry was both popular and a specialty seen in Lattes shop. After discussing Native Egyptian jewelry in the bazaars, Crossman writes (ibid., page 9): "Leaving our Oriental friends, we will notice briefly the trade as it is carried on in the European quarters, or on the border of it where both native trade and European trade are catered to. Perhaps the best store of this latter class is that of M. J. Lattes, at the beginning of the Muski. His store, though small, is very attractive. In Cairo the turquoise is the most popular of all colored stones and Mr. Lattes has some extremely handsome pieces mounted with turquoise alone or with diamonds. Nowhere outside of Cairo can one see so much and so many large pieces of turquoise jewelry. There are several other smaller European jewelry houses in this locality." A lower-resolution black & white image of one of the same cufflinks from the Hallwyl Museum (https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/the-cuff-links-that-walther-von-hallwyl-got-for-christmas-jeweller-j-lattes-cairo/UQGthZHR-DD0Cg), that is part of a curated online exhibit of the Hallwyl trip to Egypt. This shows the elegant offset design of the turquoise cabochon that is not evident in the color photo from the museum catalogue. This museum image cannot be downloaded in its entirety, but it shows both cufflinks and the top of the case lid for this set. There is no image of the interior of the case with the J. Lattes name. The case is described as rectangular, wooden with an exterior covering of dark brownish red silk velvet, with an interior lining of black silk velvet (probably the bed), and white silk (probably the case lid). The push release latch is made of brass. The case measures 8.0 cm long X 5.0 cm wide X 3.2 cm tall. The Hallwyll Museum also has 2 examples of the Egyptian Order Of Mohammed Ali, of the Supreme Class (Collar and Grand Cordon). The Supreme Class was awarded to King Gustav V of Sweden (19 June, 1938). The other Supreme Class Order of Mohammed Ali was awarded to Gustav VI when he was Crown Prince Gustave Adolf (23 December, 1938). The one catalogue photo of a hallmark on the reverse of Crown Prince Gustav Adolf's Order of Mohammed Ali breast star shows a date hallmark of "W", indicating manufacture in 1921-1922. The Hallwyll Museum catalogue identifies the Supreme Order of Mohammed Ali awarded to Gustav V as having the Collar made by J. Lattes, but the Grand Cordon sash badge and breast star are listed as being made by Maison J. Lattes and L. Rosen & Cie. Perhaps only the case has such marking, it is unclear in the catalogue description. For Crown Prince Gustave Adolf's award, it appears from the catalogue description that the Collar (including the hexagonal gold badge suspended from the collar) are probably marked J. Lattes, but the case (for the Grand Cordon sash, sash badge, and breast star?) are probably marked "J. Lattes, L. Rosen & Cie." I have previously shown some "J. Lattes L. Rosen & Cie., Le Caire" labels inside cases for a few Order of the Nile awards (the 12th and 17th photos in my post of 21 October, 2019 on this thread). However, I still have no information about the relationship between Maison Lattes and L. Rosen & Cie. A note on an antique watch website (Good Old Watch) I came across recently suggests Lattes was awarded the Order of the Nile (https://www.goodoldwatch.com/it123-royal-minute-repeating-watch.html). No other information appears in this minimal discussion of a pocket watch with a rough date of the 1910s that is identified as having belonged to King Fuad I (the case is engraved with his cipher and the Princely Crown) and as being marked J. Lattes, Geneva and Cairo.
  12. I have found a few higher-resolution images of a different example of the J. Lattes folding business advertisement flyer that I illustrated as the first 3 images in my post of 25 April, 2019 on this thread (I also included the image of the first page of that advertisement as the 6th photo in my post of 12 November, 2019). The three photos below come from an auction listing of 11 August, 2019, Lot 28 of One Source Auctions (https://www.onesourceauctions.com/auction-lot/Antique-c.-1900-s-Lattes-Jeweler-Oriental-Egypt_8764E15B9F/), also archived on the AuctionZip website (https://www.auctionzip.com/auction-lot/lot_8764E15B9F). The One Source Auctions (and AuctionZip) description provides no information on this advertisement beyond its dimensions, given as 5 .25 " (inches) X 4". This is a different, more pristine, example of this folding card than the one I illustrated from the eBay auction offering of 18 July, 2018, that has someone's numeric calculations on the first page and some water-staining of all 3 pages. The 2018 eBay listing identified the dimensions of this card as measuring 4" X 5-3/8" when folded and 5-3/8" X 8" when opened. That 2018 eBay listing included a moderate resolution image of the first page of the J. Lattes advertisement, but only lower-resolution images of the center map and back page illustrations that make up the the other 2 folding advertisement card pages. In my post of 12 November, 2019 on this thread, I mentioned that I had seen another version of this advertisement, probably the one illustrated below, as a very low-resolution image in a listing on the invaluable.com website (https://www.invaluable.com/advertising-general/sc-LY1J4TXKAW/?page=73) that was not worth posting here as it added no visible details to what I had been able to show from the 2018 eBay auction photos I posted in my November 2019 post. I believe both of those former auction listings (on eBay and invaluable.com) are no longer archived online. All 3 of the pages shown below can be zoomed for additional details. Front page of the One Source Auctions illustration of the early 20th century J.Lattes folding advertising card. This image, and the two below, can be zoomed for greater detail. Interior folded page from the One Source Auctions listing showing a map of Cairo with the location of J. Lattes shop shown just above the fold in black ink. (also see the contemporary map of this portion of Cairo from a tourist flyer for the Victoria Hotel & New Khedival that I illustrated as the 4th photo in my post about this J. Lattes advertisement on 25 April, 2019. I also included a discussion about the location of Lattes shop in that post). Back page of the J. Lattes advertising flyer from One Source Auctions listing showing Egyptian Khedivate era (1834-1914) coin currency with American $ conversion values (for the Egyptian piastre). I am unclear why these are illustrated. Perhaps this chart was considered a handy currency conversion for tourist. The presence of a map inside the flyer and the currency conversion may have been an entrepreneurial hook to make this advertising flyer useful or popular with tourist visitors to Cairo. I think it is less likely that these currency illustrations also might be in the flyer because numismatic jewelry may have been popular with European tourists visiting Egypt. The coins illustrations do assist in roughly dating the printing and potential use of this flyer to prior to the change in coin currency forms under the Sultanate (1914-1922).
  13. Gregory, this Abbas Hilmi II medal is commemorative, simply issued to celebrate 2 events in the political life of Abbas Hilmi II. It was issued to ceommemorate his return from the pilgrimage (haj) to Al-Medina and Mecca that he took in 1909 (returning in January of 1910) and to celebrate the anniversary of his coronation in January of 1892. It appears the medal was struck in January of 1910. This medal was never awarded to anyone for any particular achievement, they may have been given as gifts or made available for purchase. I am unsure about that, I know very little about such "table medals". Again, please look at some of the other information that I have posted about this medal on the discussion I referenced (in the Middle East & Arab States section") in my last post here on Friday, February 28.
  14. Dear Gregory, you have asked me this question about the value of this commemorative medal before. The few auction listings I have seen for this medal had prices between $(USD) 600-almost $5,000. One eBay offering in 2017 with minimal documentation was sold for $76!. Please do see my more correctly positioned information about this medal in my thread "Egyptian Khedive commemorative medal question" that I started on 11 November, 2016 in the "Middle East & Arab States" section here on GMIC. I am getting some additional information ready to post on that thread about background on the events commemorated by this Abbas Hilmi II medal. Thanks for your continued interest in this beautiful medal.
  15. Below is another example of a miniature Order of the Nile. This medal is from a 9-10 May, 2018 auction by Dix Noonan Webb (Lot 1367) ((https://www.dnw.co.uk/auction-archive/past-catalogues/lot.php?auction_id=476&lot_uid=311300) that also is archived on the saleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/dixnoonanwebb/catalogue-id-dix-no10052/lot-5b9ef927-7193-47b6-b74a-a8c400880591), with the auction date identified as 8 May. This is one of a mounted set of 6 miniatures identified as belonging to Captain Archibald G. Forsyth of the Royal Flying Corps. The other medals include: a 1914 Star with clasp; a British War and Victory medal with MID oak leaves; a Kingdom of Serbia Order of the Star of Karageorge with swords; and a Kingdom of Serbia Bravery Medal in silver. The set is in a case marked A. H. Baldwin & Sons, London. Some additional documents, photos, and newspaper clippings also were part of this auction lot. The auction listing includes a short biographical sketch of A. G. Forsyth's aircraft engineering background and later career, his war experiences with the Royal Flying Corps, and work designing racing car engines. Both archived listings provide equivalently high-resolution images of this set, and the Dix Noonan Webb listing also includes a high resolution image of the 2 Serbian medals. There is no information about any service in Egypt or why Forsyth may have received this award. The A. G. Forsyth Order of the Nile miniature is identified in the auction description as a Knight's Class mini, and the configuration of a ribbon with no rosette is correct for the 5th Class of this award. The form of this miniature is nearly identical to the 4th Class Officer miniature illustrated in the first 2 photos of my post of 13 July, 2019 on this thread, showing an example from a March 2019 eBay auction. Both of these versions show identical facets and linear margins of each ray of the embellishment. They both also exhibit the uncommonly undecorated link between the superior ray of the embellishment and the crown suspension device. The calligraphy of the gold central boss appears to be identical in both examples. What is distinct, and unusual, about the above Dix Noonan Webb example is that the gold margin of the central medallion's inscribed boss does not have small ball decorations, but is scalloped with simple cuts along the exterior margin, giving it a "beer bottlecap" look. The eBay example in my 13 July post has uneven facets forming the medallion frame decoration that are not spheres, but they are more fully isolated than the simple cuts made in the medallion margin of the above Forsyth miniature. The auction description provides no information about the potential date of this award to A. G. Forsyth, nor any measurements for this medal. Additional information on dates and dimensions of the Serbian Order of the Star of Karageorge are included (but not for the other medals in the group). The Dix Noonan Webb archived listing does identify the material as silver, gold appliqué, and enamel.
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