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Rusty Greaves

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  1. Owain noted in his first post of 6 December, 2017 on this thread “Miniatures of the Middle East & Arab World” that some miniatures of the Order of Ismail were made by Gardino of Rome. I have not yet come across any images of Egyptian medals made by this manufacturer (but my investigations are limited to only a couple Egyptian awards), and I have not seen any manufacturer’s hallmarks for E. Gardino on any of the miniatures of the Order of Ismail, I wanted to provide some examples of Gardino’s hallmarks. I would be very interested in seeing photos of this hallmark on any Egyptian medals if some of the GMIC collectors have them. The Gardino webiste (http://www.gardino.it/chi.html) identifies the Gardino name as associated with the original Fratelli Borani medalist company that first appears in written documents approximately in 1850 in Turin, although its founding date is unknown. A branch of that office was moved to Florence in 1864 when the capital was shifted, and later to Rome in 1871 following the unification of Italy. The Borani brothers got out of the precious metals trade, and the company was taken over by Domenico Cravanzola, who had been the director under the Fratelli Borani. He sold the business in 1913 to Luigi Raviolo and Enrico Gardino. Gardino’s son, Ettore, took over the business from Raviolo in 1927 and changed the shop name to “Gardino Succ.ri Ditta D. Cravanzola s.a.s.” The above image is the only photo I have currently found that represents a miniature identified as having been made by Gardino showing a manufacturer’s hallmark. This is a photo of the reverse of a medal identified as a miniature of the Latvian Order of Three Stars. The photo comes from a current eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/371762626684?ul_noapp=true) and the description indicates a date range of 1924-1940, and suggests this is a “Grand Cross” breast star miniature. The knotted cord is a component of the wreath surrounding the central shield on several of the following hallmark photos, shown in the 5th, 8th, and 9th examples below (especially visible in the eMedals examples of the Italian Order of the Crown and the Albanian Order of Scanderbeg and less clearly on the Vatican Order of Our Lady of Bethlehem). This also is the only example of a hallmark I have come across attributed solely to Gardino and not linked to Cravanzola. The stars separating "GARDINO" and the knot from "ROMA" are seen on each side of the word "*ROMA*" in several examples of the most common form of the Gardino hallmark, also shown below in the 5th, 8th, and 9th photos. No dimensions are given for this particular miniature medal. I am not familiar with the medals produced by these workshops nor with any of the medals shown below, but am including these to show available images of potentially relevant Gardino manufacturer’s hallmarks in the hope they may stimulate contribution of some examples on Egyptian awards, especially any miniatures, and/or some discussion of these medallists. This is the reverse of full-sized Italian Order of St. Mauritius and St. Lazarus, Knight's Class from an April 2019 auction on the Very Important Lot website (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/italy-knight-of-the-order-of-st-mauritius-and-st-174877). It reads: "D. CRAVANZOLA SUCC. F...[Frat?] BORANI *ROMA*". This is the only example of a hallmark showing the name of the Fratelli Borani linked with the name Cravanzola, that I have come across so far in my investigations. The coat of arms is the same as seen on (later?) hallmarks of "Gardino succ. Cravanzola" (see below), but there are few details visible in the wreath to determine whether the knots are present in this version or not. Reverse of a full-sized Italian Order of the Crown breast star showing the placement and approximate size of the manufacturer's hallmark. While much of the hallmark is obscured by the Tunic pin, the legend "E. GARDINO SUCC. CRAVANZOLA *ROMA*" can be read. This example is very similar to several shown below (see the 5th, 8th, and 9th photos below). Like most of the hallmarks for this medallist, they are attached cartouches not stamped hallmarks. The breast star in this cased set with the neck badge measures 74.88 mm in diameter. From a past auction archived on the Medal-Medaille website: (http://www.medal-medaille.com/sold/product_info.php?products_id=8448). Inside of the case lid for this same example of the Italian Order of the Crown from the Medal-Medaille website showing the name of "E. Gardino succ. D. Cravanzola, Gioielliere, Roma" The "E. GARDINO SUCC. CRAVANZOLA *ROMA* " manufacturer's hallmark cartouche on the reverse of full-sized breast star of the Italian Order of the Crown showing good detail of this cartouche. The knotted cords making up part of the interior design of the band around the central shield can be clearly seen in this photo, which is the symbol shown in the first photo of the Latvian miniature of the Order of Three Stars. This breast star measures 77.21 mm high X 77.76 mm wide. The auction description suggest this example may date to c.1930. From a current eMedals auction (https://www.emedals.com/italy-kingdom-an-order-of-the-crown-in-gold-commander-by-cravanzola-c-1930). The Gardino/Cravanzola name on the inside of the upper lid of the case of this same eMedals example of the Italian Order of the Crown with the spelling "Gioiellieria", in contrast with "Gioiellerie" on the Medal-Medaille example above. Another version of the Cravanzola succ. Gardino name on the inside of the upper lid of a case of a Grand Officer Class of the Italian Order of Merit of the Republic of Italy. I cannot tell if the spelling is "Gioiellerie" or "Gioiellaria" on this image. From a June 2019 auction of Bene Merenti Auktionen, archived on the Very Important Lot website (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/italy-order-of-merit-of-the-republic-of-italy-gr-174887). The above image shows the reverse of a full-sized Vatican Order of Our Lady of Bethlehem showing a similar manufacturer’s hallmark to those above for "E. GARDINO SUCC. CRAVANZOLA *ROMA* ". The wreath in this example are more worn, and the knots are not as visible as in other hallmarks. This medal is 86.27 mm high X 87.24 mm wide. This example (Item: EG2665) comes from a past eMedals aucition and is described as dating to c.1930 and made by Gardino and Cravanzola (From: https://www.emedals.com/vatican-an-order-of-our-lady-of-bethlehem-grand-officer-s-star-by-gardino-and-cravanzola-c-1930) Good image of the E. GARDINO SUCC. CRAVANZOLA *ROMA*" hallmark cartouche on the reverse of a full-sized sash badge of an Albanian Order of Scanderbeg, identified in the eMedals description as a Grand Cross sash badge and sash (no breast star is associated with this example). The knots in the wreath around the central shield are quite visible in this image. The badge measures 75 mm X 53 mm. The manufacturer is identified as "RAVIOLO & GARDINO ROMA". From a current eMedals auction, Item:EU11564 (https://www.emedals.com/an-albanian-order-of-scanderbeg-grand-cross-badge-by-raviolo-gardino-roma). An alternative form of the "E. GARDINO SUCC. DITTA CRAVANZOLA ROMA" hallmark on a full-sized neck badge of an Albanian Order of Scanderbeg. This example is identified as a Knight Grand Cross Class of this award (the neck badge suggests it is the Grand Officer or Commander Class of this award). No dimensions are provided for this badge. From a past auction curated on the Kubel 1943 website (https://www.kubel1943.it/eng/dettaglio.php?id=3729) Another example of a slightly different lunate form of the "E. GARDINO SUCC. DITTA CRAVANZOLA ROMA" hallmark on the reverse of the breast star of a full-sized Italian Highest Order of All Saints Annunciation, chain and breast star. This breast star measures 83 mm in diameter. From an April 2019 auction of Bene Merenti Auktionen, archived on the Very Important Lot website (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/italy-the-highest-order-of-all-saints-annunciatio-174869). A different form of the "E. GARDINO SUCC. CRAVANZOLA" hallmark that also includes an address "ROMA VIA DEL CORSO 341" in the center of the attached manufacturer's cartouche instead of the coat of arms. This example is on the reverse of a Libyan Order of the House of Representatives medal, and is identified in the auction description as a Grand Cross sash badge, possibly dating to 1951. This piece is 61 mm in diameter. From a past auction on The Orient Treasures website (https://www.theorienttreasures.com/shop-now/orders-medals-decorations/kingdom-of-libya-order-of-house-of-representatives-grand-cross-sash-king-idriss). The same form of hallmark as above, but executed in gold, lacking the shield and wreath with knots and having the address of the medallist in Rome. This is on the reverse of a Peruvian Order of the Sun, identified in the description as the breast star of a Grand Cross Class of this award, possibly dating to 1930. This piece measures 78.8 mm in diameter. (From: https://www.emedals.com/a-1930-peruvian-order-of-the-sun-grand-cross-star-by-e-gardino-roman). An additional variant of a E. Gardin hallmark is the square attached plate shown above with just the words "E. GARDINO ROMA", with a scrolling decor but lacking the knot design from the wreath around the shield. These are 2 examples of this attached cartouche on the full-sized Albanian Order of Fidelity (Urdhëri Besa). I have only seen this form of the Gardino cartouche on the Order of Fidelity. The example on the L is from a neck badge of a 3rd Class award of this Order (also in the double eagle shape), and this badge is identified as measuring 87 mm X 52 mm. From an August 2016 auction by La Galerie Numismatique archived on the Sixbid.com website (https://www.sixbid.com/en/la-galerie-numismatique/2873/albania/2399793/b-order-of-fidelity-urdheri-besa-b-br?term&orderCol=lot_number&orderDirection=asc&priceFrom&displayMode=large&auctionSessions=). The example on the R is a 5th Class breast badge of the Albanian Order of Fidelity and shows the placement and size of the hallmarked plate on the reverse of this badge. The badge is identified as measuring 45 mm X 36 mm. From the same August 2016 auction by La Galerie Numismatique archived on the Sixbid.com website as the image on the right: (https://www.sixbid.com/en/la-galerie-numismatique/2873/albania/2399794/b-order-of-fidelity-urdheri-besa-b-br?term&orderCol=lot_number&orderDirection=asc&priceFrom&displayMode=large&auctionSessions=). Reverse of full-sized Albanian Order of Fidelity sash badge for the Grand Cordon Class with the square "E. GARDINO ROMA" cartouche. This sash badge measures 88 mm high x 51 mm wide. The hallmark on the breast star of this set is the round version (like the 3rd, 5th, 8th, & 9th photos in this this post) with the inscription "E. GARDINO SUCC. CRAVANZOLA *ROMA*", with a central shield & wreath (see below). From an April 2019 auction of a set of sash badge, breast star, and sash by Bene Merenti Auktionen, archived on the on the Very Important Lot website (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/albania-order-of-the-loyal-besa-order-2-model-174759) Reverse of the full-sized breast badge of the same Grand Cordon Class set of the Albanian Order of Fidelity. This shows the contrasting hallmark compared with the more abbreviated square cartouche on the double eagle-forms of the sash badge, neck badge, or chest medals for this Order. It is unclear from this photo whether it shows lower detail of the knots within the wreath than other examples shown in this post. From the April 2019 auction of a set of sash badge, breast star, and sash by Bene Merenti Auktionen, archived on the on the Very Important Lot website. The breast star measures 87 mm high X 76 mm wide. Inside of the upper lid of a case holding 5 miniatures from a current eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/183840989020), using the word "Gioielleria". The description of the miniatures suggests they all were made by Gardino/Cravanzola, however none are Middle Eastern miniatures and no images are provided of the reverse of any of the five miniatures to show the form of any potential hallmarks. They include: "The Orders listed include the Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes and of Malta (Order of Malta), the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem (Holy See), the Sacred Military Constantinian Order of St. George of the Royal House of Bourbon of the Two Sicilies, the Order of Merit of the Royal House of Savoy of Italy and the Patriarchal Order of the Holy Cross (a decoration of the Melkite Patriarchate), listed in precedence."
  2. Owain, that is a very interesting variant of a miniature of the Order of the Nile! The single piece construction is uncommon. The only example I illustrated with facets only on the central rays of the embellishment (the 4th post of 2 April, 2018 on this thread) has many others design differences from this unique example. Sorry for my long silence, I was working in Mexico in a remote Maya community with no internet or phone connections for a couple months. I have a couple bits of research to update over the next couple weeks. I'll start with the usual examples of some additional miniatures of the Order of the Nile awards, none as interesting as yours from 5 March. Two obverse views of this miniature of the Egyptian Order of the Nile, 4th Class (rosette with no galon), from a March 2019 eBay auction (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/OBE-BRITISH-WAR-MEDAL-EGYPT-ORDER-OF-THE-NILE-MINIATURE-MEDAL-GROUP-OF-3-/143152249054?nma=true&si=cPHwS%252FtTJRlY2xkoq1HOZakCN%252Bw%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l257 Reverse the same miniature of the Order of the Nile from an eBay March 2019 auction. No hallmarks are visible on the reverse. Obverse of 2 Egyptian miniatures in a grouping of 5 medals (that also includes: a British War Medal 1914-1918 [silver]; a King George V Jubilee Medal 1935 [silver]; and a Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal 1953 [silver]). On the L is a miniature of the Order of the Nile, 4th Class (rosette with no galon), and on the R=a Khedive's Sudan Medal, 1910, in silver with a clasp inscription for "Zeraf 1913-14". From a December 2018 eBay auction (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Miniature-Medal-Group-Egypt-Order-Nile-Khedives-Sudan-Medal-1910-Zeraf-1913-14-/372518376249?nma=true&si=cPHwS%252FtTJRlY2xkoq1HOZakCN%252Bw%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557). Reverse of the same two Egyptian miniature medals, L=the Khedive's Sudan Medal (silver) and R= the Order of the Nile on a Spink & Sons bar.
  3. I recently came across some interesting recycled use of design elements of the Order of Ismail in the Order of Saba'a (Nishan Wissam) of Yemen. I am not very familiar with this Order, so any comments by other learned members of GMIC would be greatly appreciated. The award appears to be part of a couple that were "sponsored" by Egypt during the first period of the Yemen Arab Republic (YAR) from ~1962-1967. Owain notes in a post of March 26, 2011 in "ARAB MEDALS-Yemen" (started February 7, 2007 by Antonio Preto in this section of Middle East & Arab States) that: "I would surmise that following the overthrow of Sallal in 1967 [Abdullah al-Sallal, the first president of the YAR from September 1962-November 1967] the Egyptian sponsored awards of Saba, Marib and medals of Bravery and Liberation became obsolete and the ruling Republican Council instituted a new award of Marib to replace the previous series and thereby make a break with the Sallall (Nasser supported) regime." As can be seen in the illustrations below, this award combines a couple elements form past royal Egyptian Orders. The rayed backing embellishment appears to be from the Egyptian Order of the Nile. Hallmarks illustrated on these clearly indicate Egyptian manufacture, and the couple of examples I have seen with readable date hallmarks were manufactured within the first few years of the founding of the YAR. The central arms of the blue & gold star are those of the Order of Ismail design, lacking gold & enameled finals at the distal end of each arm of the star. The photographs show clearly that the gold floral designs within the arms are not in relief, something that is seen only on examples of the Order of Ismail made by Fahmy Tewfik Bichay, and possibly on some examples by his father Tewfik Bichay. Obverse of the YAR period Order of Saba'a, Grand Cordon sash badge, sash (replacement sash, the Order Saba'a uses the same colors as the Order of Ismail sash or ribbon, but there is a single central red strip on the Order of Saba'a in contrast with the edge stripes on each margin for the Egyptian award), and breast star, from a current auction on The Treasures of the Orient website (https://www.theorienttreasures.com/shop-now/orders-medals-decorations/yemen-order-of-saba-a-grand-cross-set-sash-breast-star-badge-medal-nichan-wissam). Note the lack of any engraving on the gold floral designs on each of the arms of the central star. The suspension device on the sash badge is made from another piece of the same design as each of the arms of the blue & gold star. The rayed embellishment is identical to many seen on the royal award version of the Order of the Nile. The gold margin of the central boss is quite similar to the form of this feature on the Order of the Nile, lacking an inner band seen on both the sash badges (& the 2nd & 3rd Class neck badges) and breast stars of the Order of Ismail. The gold line where the crotch of each blue & gold arm of the star meet also is not an aspect of the design seen in the Order of Ismail. The sash badge of this example is identified as being 70 mm in diameter and the breast star is 90 mm in diameter. This set is identified as allegedly coming from the 1950s, however, it appears most likely that this award was only created after 1962 when the Egyptian-backed revolutionary YAR troops took over North Yemen and deposed Crown Prince Muhammad al-Badr (and consistent with the date hallmark, see the discussion of the photo of the reverse of this set below). Reverse view of the same Grand Cordon set of the Order of Saba'a from the current The Treasures of the Orient auction showing the Egyptian hallmarks. The sash badge on the L exhibits Tewfik Bichay's hallmark, in addition to a silver hallmark at the far right on the central silver boss on the reverse (a purity hallmark, but I cannot read it), and a mark on the 10th ray (counterclockwise from the 12:00 position where the suspension device is attached) that is a purity hallmark identifying the Cairo assay office determination of 900 silver (90% pure). On the R, the breast star has 2 hallmarks on the tunic pin, that are a Cairo office assay mark of 900 silver and an Arabic letter date of 1962-1965. Just below and to the left of those hallmarks on the tunic pin, a hallmark on the central boss is a Cairo assay office mark for 900 silver. The 2 hallmarks on the 6th ray from the 12:00 position( again following counterclockwise) include the Cairo assay office identification of 900 silver and the Arabic date letter for1962-1965. Note the the suspension device (an arm element of the 5-pointed star) of the sash badge is gold, as in the construction the blue & gold star of the Order of Ismail. The reverse morphology of the silver embellishment looks identical to those seen on pre-egyptian Revolution versions of the Order of the Nile. Obverse of a set of the sash badge and breast star of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Saba'a, showing the same design similarities to pre-revolutionary Egyptian awards in the arms of the blue & gold star (to the Order of Ismail) and the rayed backing embellishment (to the Order of the Nile). This example comes from a March 2019 auction (Auction XLIV, Lot 3461) by La Galerie Numismatic, archived onto Sixbid.com website (https://www.sixbid.com/en/la-galerie-numismatique/5835/yemen/4879721/order-of-saba-a?term&orderCol=lot_number&orderDirection=asc&priceFrom&displayMode=large&auctionSessions=). The sash badge is identified as 79 mm X 62 mm, and the breast star is 91 mm in diameter. The maker's hallmark shown in the lower left of the photo montage is that of Tewfik Bichay, oriented incorrectly, ~90 deg counterclockwise from the correct position. The illustration above of The Treasures of the Orient example also shows this same orientation of the maker's hallmark in relation to the orientation of the suspension device. All of the examples of the Order of Ismail with the Tewfik Bichay hallmark show a correct orientation, but I am unsure if this is generally true of the Order of the Nile awards. The 2 hallmarks shown on the far R in the lower right of the photo montage include (L-R): the Cairo assay office mark for 900 silver, and the Arabic date letter for 1962-1965.
  4. Here is a nice image of the 2nd Class, Grand Officer breast star of the Order of Ismail from Egypt's Royal Jewelry Museum in Alexandria (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/96884693@N00/37385197782/in/photostream/). I have been meaning to add this photo, but lost it in my computer files for quite a while and just stumbled across it again. So many of the images I can find are from auction sites that I like to show a few museum examples that are available for anyone to visit, see, & enjoy.
  5. I have identified the individual wearing the 4th Class, Knight, Order of Ismail shown in the portrait of the 1st photo in my post of 23 March, 2019 on this thread. I am duplicating that image as this version is just very slightly higher resolution than the March image I posted and also includes the name of the studio. This portrait is of Rear Admiral (Amir el Bahr) Galal Eddin Allouba Bey, commander of the H.M.S. Mahroussa, the ship that took King Farouk I into exile in Italy. The studio name is Ahkar, but I do not know which city that studio was located in at the time of this photo. His uniform is the Egyptian Navy gala frockcoat, adopted in 1905 and apparently based upon the Ottoman Navy frockcoat. From: http://www.photorientalist.org/easymedia/exiled-king-farouk-and-narriman/narriman-farouk/ An image of the Egyptian Royal Yacht H.M.S. Mahroussa from a press photo dated 2 August, 1952 with the caption: "Brings Exiled King to Capri. Off the Isle of Capri: The Egyptian royal yacht Marroussa rides at anchor off Capri, July 29, after bringing King Farouk of Egypt and his party to their Italian haven. In the background, on Mt. Tiberio is the Hotel Augusto Cesare, where the exiled ruler spent his honeymoon with Queen Narriman. Farouk was forced to abdicate by a surprise military coup. He abdicated in favor of his infant son, King Ahmed Fuad II, who was brought by Farouk and the queen to Capri." H.M.S. Mahroussa ("Guarded by God's Blessing") was commissioned by Khedive Ismail, and was completed in 1865. It lead the inauguration ceremony opening the Suez Canal in 1869, was the ship Khedive Ismail took into exile in 1879, it also brought Khedive Abbas Hilmi II into exile in 1914, President Muhamad Anwar el-Sadat made extensive use of the yacht, visiting the US for the country's Bicentennial celebration, and taking it to the peace negotiations with Israel in 1979. The 6th photo of my post of 24 March, 2019 on this thread showing King Farouk I (wearing a similar admiral's uniform to that above of Rear Admiral Galal Allouba) and Ahmed Hassanein Pasha both wearing the Grand Cordon Class Order of Ismail decorations marks the reception greeting King Abdul Aziz Al-Saud who came to Egypt in January 1946 aboard the Mahroussa. Recently, it was the first ship through a new extension of the Suez Canal in 2015. H.M.S. Mahroussa is the oldest operating motor yacht in the world and among the 10 largest (411 ft when built and extended to 451 ft in 1970). From: http://www.photorientalist.org/exhibitions/farouk-and-narriman-egypts-last-royal-romance/photographs/ A low-resolution image of a military Pasha in full regalia, identified as Hassan Raafat Pasha in the jpg's title, wearing what appears to be an Order of Ismail (From: http://www.egy.com/historica/06-03-01.php). If this is an Order of Ismail, it is a configuration of wearing the 3rd Class Commander's neck badge similar to that shown in the 2nd photo of my 23 March, 2019 post, worn with what appears to be a shortened ribbon like a chest badge, but in the position that a neck badge would be worn. To the viewer's right is an Order of the Nile that also appears in the position of a neck badge (3rd Class, Commander's badge), but also worn on a short ribbon. As the resolution of this image is not good, I cannot be certain whether this is an Order of Ismail, but its' precedence over the Order of the Nile also suggest it may be the Nishan al-Ismail. Hassan Raafat Pasha's position is identified on the same website as an MD of the Royal Military Household. He was invested as Pasha on 1 June, 1923 (http://www.egy.com/historica/pashalst.php).
  6. I have several additional photos from the volume Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926 that relate to aspects of the costumes of individuals associated with different court bodies and roles in the Egyptian Mixed Courts system. I will first post a couple portraits of individuals whose roles in the Mixed Courts are identified in 1926 and show them in their court dress. The second set of 4 images include some group portraits of judges in the District Courts of Alexandria in 1909, one of the Parquet in 1891, court functionaries associated with the District Court of Mansourah (mostly clerks and interpreters, showing clerks wearing the bicolored sash and judicial badges but not other court functionaries), and a group photo of lawyers from Port Said in their court garb along with one clerk wearing the bicolored sash and "judicial" badge. These images principally address how sash colors (that have been slightly complicated given that only some of the roles of particular judges or other functionaries are identified in other literature and may not match available photos of those individuals) and judicial badges were worn by personnel of the Mixed Courts who were not judges. These images do help resolve some of the questions I have had about variation in sash colors and whether individuals other than judges also wore the large Mixed Courts badge. This information also may help explain the greater abundance of silver badges on auction sites, that my previous research information suggested were principally associated with prosecutors of the Parquet. It is apparent from these photographs that clerks serving the Appeals Court, the District Courts, and the Parquet also wore bi-colored sashes and judicial badges (probably all silver), potentially identifying these functionaries as other sources for many auction badges that are usually attributed to judges of the Mixed Courts. All of these images can be enlarged for greater details. The above photo shows Judge Nicolas Cambas (Greece) in his judicial costume as president of the Mixed Court of Appeals in 1926. He wears the green sash of the Appeals Court and his judicial badge should be gold. Cambas was elected as Vice-President of the Appeals Court in January 1922, and named President of that court in October 1924. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 11. I have previously illustrated Judge Michael Hansson (Norway) in his judicial costume as the Vice-President of the Mixed Court of Appeals in the 9th photo of my post of 18 April, 2019 on this thread (wearing the green sash and probably a gold badge) and dressed as the President of the District Court of Mansourah in the 7th photo of that 18 April post (wearing a red sash and a what should be the gold & silver badge, although his badge is not visible in that portrait). That costume, as President of the Mansourah District Court, would be the same as the other portrait of Hansson in his red sash and what is likely a gold & silver badge in the 6th photo of the 18 April post. Above is a portrait of Erling Qvale (Norway) President of the District Court of Alexandria in 1926. His sash is solid red and the badge should be gold & silver (the central tablet with inscription does appear to be a darker color than some of the surrounding silver of the badge in this photo). Judge Qvale was named to the District Court of Mansourah in October of 1913, he transferred to the District Court of Alexandria in January of 1917, and was made president of the District Court of Alexandria in February of 1925. He is shown seated at the head of the table of judges, all in civilian dress, in the 5th photo of my post of 18 April, 2019 on this thread showing the personnel of the District Court of Alexandria serving in 1926. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 35. Above is an image of Hangs Gram Bechmann (Denmark) as President of the District Court of Mansourah in 1926. His sash is solid red and the badge (not very visible) should be gold & silver. Beckmann was named a judge on the District Court of Mansourah in October 1922, delegated to the District Court of Alexandria in October of 1922, returned to the District Court of Mansourah in November of 1922, and elected President of the District Court of Mansourah in November 1925. Judge Bechmann is shown as the President of the District Court of Mansourah (either in 1925 or 1926) with the other judges on that court in the 1st photo of my post of 5 March, 2019 on this thread. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 36. The above portrait is of Firmin Van Den Bosch (Belgium) in his role as the Procureur Général (the Chief Prosecutor) associated with the office of the Parquet in 1926. In this portrait, Van Den Bosch is wearing a European-style evening jacket (possibly a tailcoat?) along with white tie and a white vest, rather than the Egyptian long tunic with a high collar (the stambouline, the former costume of all employees of the Ottoman Turkish Government, the name derived from Stamboul/Stambul as in Istanbul). This image shows clearly that he is wearing bi-colored sash as a member of the Parquet (with a green stripe in the superior position and a red stripe on the inferior portion of the sash) and what should be a silver badge. This is one of the photos from this anniversary reference volume showing an individual sporting medals in association with his judicial regalia. Van Den Bosch's portrait is bit unusual as most of the photos of men wearing medals with their judicial garb date to earlier periods of the Mixed Courts' existence, not at the 1926 time of this publication. Jasper Yeates Brinton (1930, The Mixed Courts of Egypt, Yale University Press, New Haven; pg. 87, note 14) states that there was a general proviso that judges not receive any honorary or material distinctions from the Egyptian Government during their tenure on the bar. However, a formal proposal was made in 1927 to codify this practice and include other officials on the Mixed Courts, especially in relation to the awarding of the tiles of "Bey" to recognize long service. At the time of the publication of Brinton's book, this proposal by the Egyptian government had not yet been voted on by the different foreign governments with legal representatives on the Courts, and apparently was not supported by many members of the Courts. It appears that Van Den Bosch is wearing insignia of the 2nd Class Grand Officer of the Order of the Nile (neck badge and breast star) and his other neck badge appears to be the 3rd Class Commander's Cross of the Belgian Order of Leopold. His two chest medals include: a 4th Class Officer's Cross (civil division) of the Belgian Order of Leopold; and probably the 4th Class Officer's Cross of the Belgian Order of the Crown. Van Den Bosch previously served as a judge on the District Court of Mansourah from October 1910 until February 1916 when he was transferred to the District Court of Cairo. He was named to the Procureur Général role on the Parquet in April of 1920. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 11. Portrait of Axel Johan Patrick Adlercreutz (Sweden) as former President of the District Court of Mansourah from 1910-1911. He is wearing a solid red sash and, although only partially visible, his badge should be gold & silver. Adlercreutz was named to the District Court of Mansourah in January 1907. After serving as President he was transferred to the District Court of Cairo in April 1912 and retired from the Courts in February of 1917. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 49. A. Arditti Bey (Egypt), the Chief Clerk of the District Court of Mansourah in 1926. This image shows that not only judges, but some of the high functionaries of the courts also wore similar regalia. Arditti Bey wears the tarboosh, high-collared tunic, as well as a sash and judicial badge. His sash is similar to that of the Parquet, with a green superior stripe and a red inferior stripe, and his badge should be silver. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg.389. The District Court of Alexandria in 1909 showing judges in their judicial regalia that should be the solid red sash and a gold & silver badge. While most individuals are wearing the high-collared Egyptian tunic coat, a few judges are wearing European style jackets. The individuals in the front row are, from L-R: Mohamed Mustafa Bey (Egypt), Aly Mazloum Bey (Egypt), Ismail Maher Bey (Egypt), Adalbert Bela de Zoltan (Austria-Hungary), Ernest Eeman (President, Belgium), Carlo Otto Montan (Sweden), Manoël Augusto Pereira e Cunha (Portugal), and Marius Joseph Paulin Suzanne (France) and Othon de Bulow (Germany). The back row includes, from L-R: Dimiltriades (Greece, no first name given in any part of this volume), an unnamed guard, Alexandre Sorokin (Russia), Halvard Nicolai Heggen (Norway), Fedor Andrew Satow (Britain), Giovanni Paulucci de Calboli (Italy), Soubhi Ghali Bey (Egypt), Abdel Messih Simaika Bey (Egypt), William-Grant Van Horne (USA), Raghb Ghali Bey (Egypt), an unnamed guard, and Salone (the Chief Clerk, also wearing a sash [I cannot tell if it is a solid red or possibly bi-colored in this poorer quality photograph] and Mixed Court badge, his nationality is not identified). From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 189. Functionaries of the Parquet in 189, showing these prosecutors wearing regalia similar to that of judges, but wearing the bi-colored sash and probably the all-silver badge. While several photos of individuals serving in the Parquet show them wearing their sashes with the green stripe uppermost (i.e., Firman Van Den Bosch above; Mahmoud Said as Chief of the Parquet in the first photo of my post of 5 March 2019 shown get District Court of Mansourah in ~1926; and Ismail Gazzarine in that same photo as the Subsitute for the the Procureur Général), almost all of these individuals above are wearing theirs so that the red stripe appears to be superior and the green stripe is inferior. Note the 3 individuals who are wearing decorations on their jackets at this date along with the official Parquet regalia. The individuals in the front row L-R are: Lemaire Bey (Inspector of the Clerk, nationality not identified), Guillaume Edward Emile Marie de Brower (Procurer General, Belgium), Emin Ghali Pacha (Chief of the Parquet of Alexandria, Egypt), In the back row are L-R: Luigi Colucci Bey (nationality not identified), Edgar Mercinier (Secretary, nationality not identified, who may be wearing a solid red-colored sash), Soubhil Ghlai Bey (who appears to be wearing his sash oriented with the green stripe uppermost and the red stripe in the inferior position, Egypt), Ahmed Zulificar Bey (Egypt), Ismail Chimi Bey (Subsitute for the the Procurer General, Egypt), From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 190. Functionaries serving the District Court of Mansourah in 1926 showing the use of similar regalia to that worn by judges for individuals serving the courts in other capacities. Most of these individuals appear to be wearing bi-colored sashes as do the personnel on the Parquet, and probably should be wearing all-silver badges. Almost all of the men are wearing their sashes oriented with the green stripe in the superior position and the red stripe in the inferior position. All of the interpreters in this photo are not wearing sashes and badges. The other individuals not wearing sashes and badges include the Chief Bailiff (5th from L in front row) and the Secretary to the President (3rd from L in the middle row). The first names and nationalities of most of these individuals are not given. The individuals in the front row are L-R: G Cassis (Clerk), Yacoub Salib (interpreter), Zaki Saleh (Clerk), G. Sabeh (Conservator of Mortgages), Poli (Chief Bailiff), Cosséry (Clerk), and Garzoni (Clerk). In the middle row from L-R are: B. Finan (Clerk, apparently wearing his sash with the red stripe uppermost and the green stripe in the inferior position, unlike all the other bi-colored sashes in this photo), Boutari (Clerk), Jourdan (Secretary to the President), Vibert-Roulet (Clerk), and Chibli (Clerk). The back row includes L-R: Bonnicci (interpreter), Habib Salem (Clerk, his sash may be solid red rather than bi-colored), Faiez Gress (interpreter), and Youssef Boutros (interpreter). From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 394. Portrait of the lawyers (avocats) serving the District Court of Port Said showing one individual who is a clerk with garb similar to judges or functionaries of the Parquet and the court costume for the lawyers. The lawyers wear silk robes, the legal cap (beretta), and the white scarf (rabat) based on that of the French bar. The first name of the clerk of interest in the first row wearing a sash and "judicial" badge is not identified and the nationalities of these men are not given. The individuals not identified with other roles all are lawyers. The individuals in the front row are L-R: Christo Medinas (wearing a beretta), Joseph Zalout, George Mouchbahani, (Delegate), Spagnolaki (Clerk in the bi-colored green & red sash and probably silver "judicial" badge), and George Anasassiadis. In the middle are L-R: Pascal Gabelli, Nicolas Zizinia, and Domenico Mascagni. The back row includes L-R: Jean Papayoannou, Charles Bacos, Kimon Valendi, and Camillo Corsetti. Also see the 4th photo in my post of 1 April, 2019 showing lawyers in the courtroom of the Appeals Court in 1926 wearing their legal costumes, including the French epitoge, the French version of the academic hood, partially visible on the backs of the 3 lawyers in the right foreground of the photo. From: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 206.
  7. I have had minimal luck finding background information about J. Lattes, the manufacturer of the most beautiful examples of the Order of Ismail, as well as other Egyptian medals. I have previously given a short synopsis in my post of 14 November, 2017 on this thread of a brief mention in The Jewelers Circular and Horological Review, Vol 34, No. 24, of 14 July, 1897, pg. 9 of the shop of J. Lattes as a small but attractive store at the margin of the market area (the Muski) and what the author (Chas Crossman) termed the foreigner's quarters. I have recently been searching some advertisements relative to manufacturers of the Mixed Courts judicial badges, and came across an example of an undated folding business card for J. Lattes in English from an 18 July, 2018 eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/163133205268?rmvSB=true). The listing included low-resolution images of the 3 illustrations that make up the folding advertisement card pages measuring 4" X 5-3/8" when folded and 5-3/8" X 8" when opened. The first page is an advertisement , possibly for liquidation sale of some of Lattes' stock. This is the only information I have found identifying the founding date of Lattes' shop as 1860. The back page shows 7 coins, apparently with prices. When opened, the inside page shows a map of Cairo indicating the location of Lattes' shop on Sharia el Manakh street. There is a slightly higher resolution image of the first page of this card that I have included as the first image below. Page 1 of the J. Lattes folding trade card. Low-resolution image of the back page of this folding trade card. Low-resolution photograph of the interior map of the J. Lattes folding card showing the location of Lattes shop. Above is a roughly contemporary map of Cairo for tourists from the inside of a folding advertising flyer for the Victoria Hotel & New Khedival showing the location of that Hotel with the main street route of Sharia Kamel to Opera Square continuing to Sharia Abdine and a couple tram routes (from:https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/12708781123/in/dateposted/). In comparison with the poor quality image of the eBay auction map image above, this higher-resolution map (that can be enlarged) does show the approximate location where J. Lattes shop was located on Sharia el Manakh (on the north side of the street?) between Sharia el Imad el Din on the west and probably an unnamed alleyway on the east side that is approximately 1/3 of a block west of Opera Square. In a listing of shops selling European wares for travelers to visit in Cairo from the 1908 book Egypt and the Sûdân: Handbook for Travellers, 6th Edition, by Karl Baedecker, Karl Baedeker Publishers, Leipzig (Dulau & Co., London; Charles Scribner's Sons, New York ) the author identifies the address of J. Lattes shop as "Sharia el-Manâkh 30". A telegraph office was located at the most western end of this block, identified as the "Eastern Telegraph Office" in a very good map from 1920 (titled: General Map of Cairo; created by the Survey of Egypt, 1920; Contributor Names: Egypt. Maṣlaḥat al-Misāḥah; Call Number: G8304.C2 1920 .E4; Digital ID: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g8304c.ct002478; Library of Congress Control Number: 200958102) available online though the US Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, Washington, D.C. 20540-4650 USA at https://www.loc.gov/resource/g8304c.ct002478/?r=-0.524,-0.324,2.049,0.835,0. This location also is listed as the "foreign telegraph office" located at "15 Sharia-el-Manakh" on page 21 of the travel guide: Cairo of To-Day: A Practical guide to Cairo and its Environs , 1898, by E. A. Reynolds-Bali, London, Adams and Charles Black (printed by R.& R. Clark, Limited, Edinburgh). Below are two stereo views of this market area taken on unidentified streets in the early 20th century. Stereo image titled: "The 'Muski'. The great street of Cairo and one of the most interesting in the world, Egypt", taken on approximately 21 September 1903 by William Hermann Rau. From the US Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540, USA. Call Number: LOT 13980, no. 38; Digital ID: stereo 1s01871 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s01871; Library of Congress Control Number: 2009631292; LCCN Permalink: https://lccn.loc.gov/2009631292 (From: https://www.loc.gov/item/2009631292/). Stereo view titled: "The Muski, Cairo Egypt", from the Keystone-Mast Collection at University of California Riverside Museum of Photography. Taken September 2, 1931by George Lewis (https://oac.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt6f59q0kj/?docId=kt6f59q0kj&order=2&brand=oac4&layout=printable)
  8. Les and Jocktamson provide the most knowledgeable discussions of this topic. Their advice and warnings are the best suggestions about whether to treat older leather or not. An antique furniture restoration craftsman in Massachusetts recommended Skidmore's Leather Cream to me for treatment of the leather seat on a Campeche chair made by William Spratling in the 1940s (Spratling was from New York, educated as an architect in New Orleans, and made his name by reviving the Mexican silver industry in Taxco combining indigenous and art deco elements, he also made some furniture; Marilyn Monroe bought several pieces of furniture from Spratling shortly before her suicide; Spratling also assisted Diego Rivera in obtaining some of his early commissions for murals). This leather cream is made in Port Townsend, Washington state, USA. It contains no animal products, silicone, or driers. It has unspecified compounds from plants, trees, and beeswax. Skidmore also makes other beeswax products for wood finishes. As Peter Monahan noted, beeswax is used in some museum curation for attachments, rests, and holding items together as it is very reversible. The chair seat had suffered much use, some water damage, flaking, etc. I have found the treatment with Skidmore's Leather Cream (on both faces of the leather) to be most successful in restoring suppleness and protecting this leather. Skidmore's Leather Cream is, of course, not a museum curatorial product, but it is a good compromise between my wish to protect this valuable item for the future and enjoy sitting in it. This is not a product I use on the cattle or exotic leathers of my shoes, western boots, belts, etc. (where I use Lexol brand cleaner, conditioner, and then colored or neutral shoe creams for maintenance and protection of items in everyday use).
  9. An example of a Mixed Courts judicial silver badges manufactured by a jeweler I have not seen represented before is listed (Lot 74177) on a current auction by Heritage Auctions (https://fineart.ha.com/itm/silver-smalls/an-egyptian-silver-magistrate-s-badge-from-the-reign-of-abbas-ii-egypt-circa-1900marks-unidentified-cipher-zivy-fr/a/5403-74177.s) and also listed on liveauctioneers.com website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/70835139_74177-an-egyptian-silver-magistrate-s-badge-from-the-r). This badge was made by Zivy Frères & Cie., a Swiss jewelry house, watchmaker, and goldsmith with addresses in Paris and at 10 rue Chèrif Pacha, Alexandria (the same street where Horovitz had a storefront at 26 rue Chèrif Pacha, see my post of 1 December, 2018 where I illustrated a silver badge made by Horovitz, and the last image in that shows a photo from ~1900 of the rue Chèrif Pacha). In addition to being the only badge made by Zivy Frères & Cie. that I have found photos of, this example has some interesting differences in the detail of its execution, and one very odd missing symbolic element. Obverse of the Mixed Courts badge made by Zivy Frères & Cie., Alexandria. The auction description calls this a "Magistrates badge from the reign of Abbas Hilmi II", identifies the manufacturer as Zivy Frères, considers the hallmark ("cipher") as unidentified, and gives the measurement as 4-5/8" (117.5 mm) high X 3-5/8" (~92 mm) wide, and provides a very approximate date of c.1900. The Zivy Frères & Cie. example shows some very significant variation in many details of its design compared with other Mixed Courts badges. The above image can be zoomed for additional detail. A couple aspects appear more detailed and three-dimensional; specifically, the depth of relief in the crown (although the superior crescent appears to be less detailed, the inferior band of the crown also shows less crisp definition of its design elements, and possibly other crown components are slightly different) and the execution of the tasseled cords at each of the upper corners of the mantle in the coat of arms. The interior loops (those on the crown side of the mantle corners) of the tasseled cords each form heart-shaped loops, compared with the more triangular ovals seen on all other examples. The exterior loops of these two cord elements also show somewhat greater detail (especially the left exterior loop) and relief. There is a raised "cord" border to the fringe and interior of the mantle that I also have not seen on other badges. Such a cord is present on the exterior portions of the mantle in other badges, between the embroidered portion of the mantle and the fringe, but not on the interior. The Zivy Frères badge also has a raised cord border on the two superior lateral exterior drapery folds of the mantle between the first (lower) panel of spiral "embroidery" next to the fringe and the more superior embroidery panel of triangular designs, also not seen on other examples. In contrast, many other elements of this Zivy Frères badge are much less detailed in their design. All 4 tassels are rendered in lower relief and detail, and each of the interior tassels lacks the longer, straight section of cord seen in all other examples. Both finials of the two tughs, as well as the horsetail embellishments, are executed in less detail, especially compared with the Froment-Meurice and Stobbe examples, and even compared with the Horovitz badge (the one Horovitz example I have seen photos of seems to be made with less careful craftsmanship than Froment-Meurice or Stobbe, but still is much more detailed the this Zivy Frères badge) that I illustrated in my post of 1 December, 2018 on this thread. The oak leaves on the L and the laurel leaves on the R of the tablet with inscription are much less detailed than on other examples, even less so than the Horovitz example. The superior star and rays above the inscription tablet may be lower relief and appear less finely designed. The ermine tail relief elements distributed across the interior of the mantle are executed in larger and much coarser fashion than on any other examples, and several that normally appear across other designs are missing (i.e., the two that appear below the oak & laurel branches and above the margins of the Order of Medjidie badge element; the 2 just below the cut ends of the oak & laurel branches; and the two on either side of the hand of justice on the superior finial of the L tugh, all of which are visible even on the less-detailed Horovitz example. The most dramatic differences from other badges are apparent in the lower portion of the badge. Below the union of the union of the oak & laurel branches, a ring is present, but the crescent and star is completely missing. This seems quite an odd omission of an important symbolic element. No other example I have seen lacks this Ottoman emblem. The Order of Medjidie is missing the full circumference of the 7-pointed, multi-rayed, star embellishment, and the central medallion frame is much thinner than on other badges. Its surrounding wreath also appears to be much less detailed in its execution. The auction description notes some damage to the enamel (of the central tablet’s inscriptions), but in comparing the inscription with other examples, there appears to be some lower elegance in the calligraphy of this example even before such damage occurred. Although the height dimension of this badge is not that anomalous (117.5 mm, compared with more common measurements of 115, or 116 mm, although at least one other example is identified as 117 mm), the width of 92.07 mm is slightly larger than almost all other examples from auction sites providing measurements that generally are 85 mm or maximally identified as 88 mm. The multi-rayed embellishment does appear to extend further beyond the mantle margins than on other manufacturer's examples. Close-up of the inferior portion of the Zivy Frères badge showing the missing crescent & star element below the tied oak & laurel branches and the much less detailed execution of the Order of Medjidie symbol. The coarser ermine tail decorations, the less well-modeled "fur" relief of the mantle interior, and less well-executed oak & laurel leaves also are apparent in this view. For comparison, above is the inferior design portion of the silver judicial badge made by Froment-Meurice and attributed to Judge Herbert Hills (http://www.dreweatts.com/auctions/lot-details/?saleId=13863&lotId=175). Reverse of the Mixed Courts badge made by Zivy Frères & Cie., Alexandria. Note that the 5 rivet fasteners normally visible on the reverse where the mantle component is attached to the multi-rayed embellishment are not present on this example, suggesting a soldered attachment rather than rivets (areas of solder may be visible along the joint between the central shield-shaped portion and the multi-rayed embellishment). . Reverse of the Mixed Courts badge made by Zivy Frères & Cie. with the tunic pin opened showing the placement of the name "ZIVY FRERES" and their manufacturer's hallmark. No silver assay hallmarks are visible on the reverse. Close-up view of the name "ZIVY FRERES" and probably their manufacturer's hallmark (unfortunately not detailed enough to be able to see clearly, but it does not appear to be a silver purity hallmark). The Zivy Frères name shows a double strike in its application. I have found very few internet images of Zivy Frères silver pieces, and none so far that show the firm's hallmark. Business card of Zivy Frères & Cie. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/25209863512/in/dateposted/). Examples of this card also are currently offered on an eBay auction (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-FRANCE-Zivy-Freres-Co-The-provider-of-Jewelries-to-HM-King-of-EGYPT/303120051239?hash=item46935cec27:g:YCIAAOSwWrNcFTNE). The crown in the upper left of the card is a version of the Egyptian Royal Crown. Advertisement for Zivy Frères & Cie. from pg. XX of Alexandrie: Reine de la Mèditeranèe, No 1, Juillet 1928, 1ère Partie (http://www.cealex.org/pfe/diffusion/PFEWeb/pfe_068/PFE_068_002_1_w.pdf(http://www.cealex.org/pfe/diffusion/PFEWeb/pfe_068/PFE_068_002_1_w.pdf).
  10. I have some additional photos and information from the volume Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le: Journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926 that I wish to share. In this post, I want to include images and information associated with individuals I have mentioned in past posts. I will treat each person that I have found something about in the order that they appeared on this thread. The only individual I have not been able to get any additional information about from this publication is the Greek Judge Apostolo N. Gennaropoulo, whose cased silver judicial badge made by Froment-Meurice and a portrait photo appeared on an eBay auction of September, 2014. I first illustrated Judge Gennaropoulo’s badge and portrait in the final photo of my post of 24 March, 2017, and the reverse of his badge is shown in the 7th photo of judicial badges (the 3rd to last of the illustrations of Froment-Meurice manufacturer’s marks) in my post detailing manufacturer’s and assay hallmarks of 28 February, 2019. It may be that Judge Gennaropoulo was not appointed to the court until after 1926, when the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume was published. So far, I have not found information about this individual in other research sources I have consulted. I have scanned the photos from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume that I am including below in black and white as that seems to provide better detail of the images. Each of them have the decorative ancient Egyptian frame motifs around the photos in a rose color as shown in the scanned images from my 1 April, 2019 post, although they do not appear in color here. All of the scanned photos from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume can be zoomed for somewhat greater details. Herbert Augustus Hills (1837-1907) I illustrated the obverse of the silver judicial badge identified as belonging to Herbert Hills of Great Britain, in the 1st photo of my post of 24 March, 2017. I illustrated the reverse of that badge that has a hand-written note attributing the badge to Judge Hills in my post of 7 November, 2017. I have included images of both the obverse & reverse of that badge below. Herbert Hills is identified in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume’s appendix listing of personnel for the District Courts. Hills is identified (pg. XII) as having been appointed in November of 1875 as a judge to the District Court in Alexandria, and promoted to Conseiller (legal advisor) to the Court of Appeals in October 1882 (Mark S. W. Hoyle, a moderately prolific recent scholar of the Egyptian Mixed Courts identifies his initial appointment year as 1876, probably an incorrect date, in his 1986 article: The structure and laws of the Mixed Courts of Egypt. Arab Law Quarterly, Vol 1 (3): 327-345). In the appendix list of personnel serving the Appeals Court, Hills is identified (pg. IV) as a former judge in Alexandria, and promoted to the Appeals Court in October, 1882, and he resigned in February, 1904. That section also states he was awarded the 2nd Class Order of Mejidie (he received this in either 1904 or 1905, a note in The Law Times: The Journal of the Law and The Lawyers, Vol CXIII of March 11, 1905, pg. 442 states that "Mr. Herbert Augustus Hill, late Judge in the Egyptian Mixed Court of Appeal at Alexandria, has received the Royal license and authority to accept and wear the Insignia of the Second Class of the Imperial Ottoman Order of the Medjidieh"). No photo of Judge Hills is included in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume, and I have not found any images of him in y other research. This information does not resolve the question I mentioned in both posts about why Judge Hills would have a silver badge when his appointment to the District Court of Alexandria should have meant his regalia included a gold and silver badge. It also puzzles me whether as a Conseiller in his later appointment to the Appeals Court he might have worn a gold judicial badges (the design for the Appeals Court), or retained a previous badge (again what should have been a gold & silver badge from his service on the District Court) as he was not a judge on that highest court. In both cases, this silver badge remains either an anomalous example of regalia associated with his identified roles on the Mixed Courts or a problematic attribution to Judge Hills. Obverse of the silver judicial badge attributed to Judge Herbert A. Hills of Great Britain (From a June 2015 auction : Dreweatts Bloomsbury Auctions; lot 175; formerly listed at: http://www.dreweatts.com/cms/pages/lot/13863/175, but archived on The Saleroom website: https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/dreweatts/catalogue-id-drewea10199/lot-d2a1fe08-3bbf-4c29-a53d-a4aa00a27910). Identified as made by Froment-Meurice and measuring 12 cm high X 8.5 cm wide and weighing 173 g. Reverse of the badge attributed to Judge Hills, showing the note that is the basis for identifying this badge with Herbert Hills. It is uncertain whether the reverse has any hallmarks for Froment-Meurice. This image is a higher-resolution photo of the reverse than the version I uploaded in my may 7 November, 2017 post on this thread and can be zoomed for better details of the attached note. Alexander Cockburn McBarnet (1867-1934) Egyptian Zogist posted a link (in his post of 4 November, 2017) to an auction by Brightwells of November, 2017 that is archived on The Saleroom website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-us/auction-catalogues/brightwells/catalogue-id-srbr10077/lot-b19bfcb8-19b4-41fd-808e-a81900b1168c) of medals and clothing belonging to Alexander Cockburn McBarnet. I commented on the information about the judicial badge in this lot (282) in my 2 posts of 6 December, 2017 but did not illustrate the badge as it is a very low-resolution image. Owain commented on potential dating of some of McBarnet’s other awards in his post of 7 November, 2017 on this thread. The Brightwells’ auction of November 2017 identifies McBarnet as having been appointed as a District Judge in to the Indigenous (“Native”) Court of Appeals in 1913, as a judge in the District Court of Asyut (also indigenous?) in 1906, and as holding various other legal offices in Egypt subsequently. The appendices in Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume that identify past & current officials of the Appeals Court lists McBarnet (pg. V), of Great Britain, former Conseiller (legal advisor) to the Indigenous Court of Appeals (no starting date is given in this entry), but does identify him as having been appointed in December 1920 to the Mixed Appeals Court, and working in that office at the time of the 1926 publication. McBarnet is not in the photograph of the Appeals Court that I posted on April 1, 2019 in this thread. No photos of Judge McBarnet are featured in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume, and I have not yet encountered any others in my research. In regard to the question about McBarnet’s other awards discussed by me in both my posts of 6 November, 2017 and by Owain on 7 November, 2017, I previously overlooked the information in the Brightwells’ auction listing the original bestowal documents as April 14, 1914 for receipt of the 3rd Class Order of Medjidie, and the August 7, 1917 receipt of the 3rd Class Order of the Nile (additionally, his OBE was awarded on March 30, 1920 and CBE on March 24, 1922). Jasper Yeates Brinton's comment about restrictions on serving judges from receiving honors from the Egyptian government during their service (Brinton, Jasper Yeates, 1968. The Mixed Courts of Egypt, 2nd Edition. Yale University Press, New Haven, pp. 53-54) may not have been fully in effect at this time, or McBarnet may have received these during intervals between his different court service. I have photographs for future posts of earlier Mixed Courts judges wearing medals along with their judicial costumes, a practice that appears to have ended sometime in the earliest 1900s. Note in my discussion above that Judge Herbert A. Hills was not awarded the Order of Mejidie until after his retirement from the Egyptian Mixed Courts. Also in relation to this question, the entry for Pierre Crabitès in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume appendix listing personnel of the District Courts (pg. XI) does not identify his reciept of the Grand Officer Class of the Order of Ismail, consistent with Brinton's statement that, at least at this time, honors and awards were not given to sitting judges until the end of their tenure on the bench. Low-resolution image of awards of Alexander Cockburn McBarnet from the November 2017 Brightwells’ auction. From top to bottom: McBarnet’s judicial badge (identified in the auction description as 115 mm high X 85 mm wide, silver, & silver gilt), 3rd Class neck badge of the Order of Medjidie, 3rd Class neck badge of the Order of the Nile, Commander’s neck badge of the British CBE (civil). On the bottom left are his OBE breast badge and miniature of that award lacking its ribbon. On the lower right are miniatures of his OBE, Order of the Nile, and Order of Medjidie. Santos Manoël Jaoquim Rodrigues Monteiro (1879-1952) I illustrated a Portuguese commemorative medal celebrating the life of Dr. Manual Monteiro (of Portugal) in my post of 26 April, 2018 that identified him as a former judge on the Egyptian Mixed Courts. In the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume, Santos Manoël Jaoquim Rodrigues Monteiro is identified as a judge in the District Court of Mansourah beginning in October, 1916 and was transferred to the District Court of Alexandria in February of 1921. He was still serving in that office at the time of the 1926 publication (pg. XV). Additional information about Dr. Monteiro is in my 26 April, 2018 post (i.e., he was made Vice-President of the Alexandria District Court in 1930, and resigned in 1940 to return to Portugal). Obverse of the table medal commemorating the life of former Mixed Courts Judge Dr. Manuel Montero, who also was an historical archaeologist, ethnologist, and art historian of Romanesque Portuguese art. Photo of the District Court officials of Alexandria, probably from 1925 from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume (pg. 192). This image can be zoomed for better details. Judge Monteiro is seated second from the viewer's right of the Court President, seated at the head of the far end of the table. The judges in this photo include, from the foreground left running clockwise around the table: Paul Joseph Randet (France); Dr. Alvaro da Costa Machado Villela (Portugal): Stavros Ange Vlachos (Greece); Adrian Theodor Louis Allard Heyligers (Netherlands); Dr. Jonkheer Hubert Williem van Asch van Wyck (Netherlands); Salvatore Messina (Italy); Paul Beneducci (Russia); Ragheb Bey Ghali (Egypt); Don Alfonso Aguirre y Carrer, Comte de Andino (Vice-President, Spain); Erling Qvale (President, Norway); Ahmed Fayek Bey (Chief of the Parquet, Egypt); Manuel Monteiro (Portugal); William Hobart Houghton Thorne (Britain); Antoine R. Keldany Bey (Egypt); Youssef Zulificar Bey (Egypt, later Pasha as he was the father of Queen Farida & father-in-law to King Farouk I, Youssef Zulificar also married the sister of fellow Mixed Court judge and Egyptian modernist artist Mahmoud Said); Mohamed Tewfik Zaher Bey (Egypt); Khalil Ghazalat Bey (Egypt); Mohammed Aly Zaki Bey (Egypt); and Rober Llewllyn Henry, Jr. (USA). The Chief Clerk, M. Adib Maakad Bey (Egypt), is shown sitting at the right away from the main assembly table. Michael Hansson (1875-1944) I illustrated a photo of the Norwegian Judge Michael Hansson wearing his judicial costume in my post of 3 May, 2018. This photo came from a Norwegian biographical website (https://nbl.snl.no/Michael_Hansson). This same portrait also appears in Hansson’s posthumously-published popular book on this life in Egypt: 25 år i Egypt, 1946. Forlagt Av. H. Aschehoug & Co., (W. Nygaard), Oslo (opposite page 17). I am including again this 1912 photo of Michael Hansson in his judicial costume below. He was apparently a prominent member of the Courts, and several additional photos and information are available in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume. In the listings of personnel in the District Courts, Hansson is identified (pg. XIV) as having been appointed in January 1907 to the District Court in Mansourah, transferred to District Court of Alexandria in October 1913, and promoted to Conseiller (legal advisor) to the Mixed Court if Appeals in April 1915. He is identified in the appendix listing personnel of the Appeals Court (pg. V) as a former judge to the Mixed Tribunals of Alexandria from April 1915, as Vice-President of the Mixed Court of Appeals in October 1924, and in 1926 he was still serving as Vice-President of the Appeals Court. Additional information on Hansson is in my 3 May, 2018 post; including his promotion to President of the Court of Appeals in 1927, his retirement from the Courts in 1931, and subsequent career with the the Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague, other international arbitration commissions, and 1938 Nobel Prize acceptance speech on behalf of the Nansen International Office for Refugees. Hansson also was probably awarded his Grand Cordon Class Order of Ismail and Order of the Nile after his retirement from the International Mixed Courts in Egypt, neither of this honors are mentioned in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume's descriptions of his career in Egypt. Portrait of Michael Hansson, from 1912 as a District Court Judge in Mansourah. In relation to the question I had about whether his sash is a single color or bi-colored, the appointment information in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume indicates his sash is a solid red as he was appointed to the District Courts at the time of this portrait. Portrait of Michael Hansson from a section in Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume listing past presidents of the Tribunal of Mansourah (pg. 50). The dates 1911-1913 identify his term as President of the District Court of Mansourah. The pleats in the sash in this image show that this was a feature of the District Courts sash as well, an aspect not always visible in other images of the Mixed District Court judges. Hansson also is illustrated in the above photo from pg. 190 of the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume with the Tribunal in Mansourah in 1907, with all judges wearing their Court attire. Hansson is the 4th judge from the L in the back row. A much younger Mahmoud El Toayar Bey (thinner & with much more robust mustaches, compared with the 3rd and 4th photos in my post on this thread of 1 April, 2019, that I believe help identify him as the unnamed judge in the first 2 photos in that post) is standing next to him (identified as the Substitut du Procureur Général), the 3rd judge from the L in the back row. Mahmoud El Toayar Bey would have been at least 15 years younger in this image than the studio portraits I believe show him near the time of his initial appointment to the Court of Appeals (1922) and almost 19 years younger than the photos from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume identifying him in the assembly and in court that I posted on 1 April. This image can be zoomed for greater detail. When enlarged, this photo shows nicely the single color of the judges sashes (red) and the contrasting gold & silver coloration of the District Court badges. The other individuals are: Front row L-R: Youssouf Soliman Bey (Egypt); Anastase N. Stoupis (Greece); Luis Comulada (President, Spain); Boutros Youssef Bey (Egypt); Ovidio de Cergueira-Borges Cabral d’Alpoïm (Portugal). Back row L-R: an unnamed Egyptian guard; Moustapha Fathy Bey (Egypt); Axel Johan Patrick Adlercreutz (Sweden); Mahmoud El Toayar Bey (Egypt); Michael Hansson (Norway); Hussein Kamel Sourour Bey (substitute for the Procureur Général, Egypt); and an unnamed Egyptian guard. Portrait from the front matter of the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume listing current high officers of the Mixed Courts (pg. 12). As Vice-President of the Court of Appeals, Hansson’s sash in this image should be green. It is a bit unclear whether he also would is wearing the gold badge of the Appeals Court, rather than what should have been the gold and silver badge of the District Courts. However, when enlarged this photo appears to show a badge of a single hue, lacking contrasting dark and lighter areas such as are visible as in the previous image of the badges worn by the Mansourah Court judges in 1907. Joseph Timmermans (born=?/d. 1897) On 31 October, 2018 I illustrated a Mixed Courts judicial badge that was from a September, 2014 auction by Jean Elsen & ses Fils archived on the acsearch.info website (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3990624). This badge was identified as having been used in the Courts of Alexandria and belonging to Joseph Timmermans who was correctly identified in the auction information as a Belgian who served as the Procureur Général prés les Juridictions mixtes á Alexandrie. Another part of the auction description gave his name as “Jules” Timmermans. His name is correctly Joseph Timmermans. He is identified in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume’s appendix listing of personnel on the District Courts (pg. IX) as Belgian, appointed as a judge to the District Court in Alexandria in April 1883, as a past Procureur Général prés les Jurisdictions Mixtes in June 1892, and in February 1894 was re-appointed as Judge in Alexandria. He died in Alexandria on 10 February, 1897. On pg XXII (in the listing for personnel of the Parquet) Timmermans’ entry confirms his positions as a former judge of the Mixed Tribunal of Alexandria, his appointment as Procurer Général starting in June, 1892, and resumption of his position as a judge on the Mixed District Court in Alexandira in February, 1894. In the Parquet listing on pg. XXII he also is identified as a recipient of the Order of Osmanieh, 3rdClass. The gold & silver District Court badge made by Froment-Meurice from the Jean Elsen & ses Fils auction of September 2014 attributed to Joseph Timmermans. The auction lot also included the award letter of Timmermans’ 3rd Class Order of Osmanieh, dated 16 March, 1893, apparently with a hand-written translation by the Khedive Abbas Hilmi II. In my post of 31 October, 2018 I was curious whether the appropriate badge for a Procureur Général associated with the office of the Parquet, should have been a silver badge. This question is resolved, at least partially, by the fact that Timmermans spent a significant amount of his career serving on the District Court of Alexandria. He would have appropriately been issued the gold & silver District Court badge for his initial appointment to the court in Alexandria, and may have used it (or another?) for his final 3 years on the District Court in Alexandria. Whether he retained this gold & silver badge during his time serving as Procurer, or whether he would have been issued another different badge (all silver) is still unclear to me, but perhaps the role of Procureur associated with bringing cases before the District Courts might have arrayed him in the regalia of the District Courts (gold and silver badge, but what color sash?) Portrait from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume identifying past Procureur Généraux of the Mixed Courts (pg. 42). The dates 1892-1894 are those of his service as a prosecutor. Carl Valdemar Kraft (1849-1924) In the 2nd photo of my post of 5 March, 2019 I included a postcard image of the Danish Judge Carl Valdemar Kraft. Additional images and a small amount of information about him also are available in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume. Kraft is identified as having been named to the District Court in Mansourah in January, 1896. He was transferred to District Court of Cairo in June of 1901. He reached the age of majority for court service in 1920. He was awarded the Grand Officer Class of the Order of the Nile (pg. X). Postcard portrait of Carl Valedemar Kraft found tucked into a copy of Michael Hansson’s: 25 år i Egypt, 1946. Forlagt Av. H. Aschehoug & Co., (W. Nygaard), Oslo that was owned by Rudolph Kraft (a brother of Carl Valdemar Kraft), that has Rudolph Kraft's name inside the front cover, dated 1948. See my post of 5 March that provides bracketing dates for why this portrait probably was made between Kraft's initial appointment in Mansourah in 1896 and 1914 when Atelier Reiser was relocated to Munich, either just before or after WWI broke out. This portrait was made in Reiser's studio in Alexandria (another was located in Cairo). Portrait of Carl Valdemar Kraft from the section of the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume identifying past Presidents of the Mixed Tribunals of Cairo (pg. 48). The dates 1916-1920 are the period of his tenure as President of the District Court of Cairo. The Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume spells his name “Karl”, which appears to be incorrect. All other sources I have located spell his name “Carl”, including hand-written information on the back of the Reiser postcard portrait of Kraft (shown above) in the handwriting of his brother Rudolph Kraft. The Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume does have some discrepancies in the spelling of Egyptian and foreign names between the legends on portraits, group photos of courts and functionaries, and the listing of career highlights in the appendices. I have used the spellings in the appendices, as they provide the full names of individuals who often are listed by the letter of their first names and surnames, surnames only (almost exclusively for foreign personnel only), partial honorific, or with alternative spellings to those in some of the figure captions. Carl Valdemar Kraft is shown in the above group photo in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume (pg. 189) of the Cairo Tribunal in 1909, seated second from L in the first row. This image can be zoomed for better details. The other individuals in the photo are, front row L–R: Mohamed Sadek Bey (Egypt); Carl Valedemar Kraft (Denmark); Dr. Frédéric Herzbruck (President, Germany); Diderik-Galtrup-Gjedde Nyholm (Denmark); and Achille Adolph Eeman (Belgium). 2nd row L-R: Herbert Welk Halton (Britain); Youssouf Aziz Bey (Egypt); Cornelis Bernardus Johannes Aloysius Wierdels (Netherlands); Walter Van Renssalaer Berry (USA); Francis Laloë (France); and Julius Cornélis Théodorus Heyligers (Netherlands). Back row L-R: Luis Comulada (Spain); Mohammed El Naggari Bey (Egypt); Fuad Gress Bey (Egypt); and Ahmed Raguib Badre Bey (Egypt).
  11. Below is a cased example of the 3rd Class, Commander, Order of Ismail from Lot 1027 in an April, 2019 auction on Very Important Lot (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/egypt-ismail-order-nischan-al-ismail-3-class-175085). This example is made by Lattes of Cairo. The dimensions of this example are given as 83 mm high X 61 mm wide, and it weighs 49.0 g. The description identifies this piece as 750 gold, correctly as 14 k gold. These are not high resolution images, but they confirm the hallmark placements on the Lattes-made Order of Ismail as seen in other examples I have illustrated on this thread. Obverse of this Commander Class Order of Ismail in its case. Oblique view of the obverse of this 3rd Class Order of Ismail in its case. Reverse of this 3rd Class Order of Ismail showing the full set of 3 hallmarks on the suspension clip to the ribbon, the single hallmark for Cairo manufacture of 18 k gold, and the full set of 3 hallmarks on the reverse boss of the central medallion. The resolution is low, but all appear to match the close-up image of the hallmarks on the suspension clip (shown below). Detail of the obverse of the crown suspension device, showing the placement of the 3 hallmarks on the right side of the suspension device arm connecting the superior ray of the star with the crown suspension device. Close-up detail of the reverse of the crown suspension and suspension clip showing the only good resolution image of the hallmarks on this example of a Commander Class of the Order off Ismail. The 3 hallmarks on the suspension clip indicate the Cairo assay office identification of 18 k gold, the ibis for Egyptian manufacture, and the letter "A" indicating manufacture in 1925-1926. The single hallmark on the reverse the crown device shows the Cairo assay office designation of 18 k gold. Inside of the superior lid of the case associated with this Commander Class Order of Ismail showing the inscriptions. View of the exterior upper lid of the case for this Order of Ismail. Lot 1028 from the same April 2019 auction by Very Important Lot also included the example below that is erroneously listed as a miniature of the Order of Ismail (https://veryimportantlot.com/en/lot/view/egypt-ismail-order-nischan-al-ismail-and-the-m-175086). This is the same design as an item from a December 2017 auction by Spink & Son, archived on the Salesroom website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-us/auction-catalogues/spink/catalogue-id-srspi10156/lot-bd1c4e4c-7dc1-4560-a3c7-a83200ba36e7) that I previously illustrated in the 2nd photo of my first post on 6 December, 2017 on this thread (also identified by Spink & Son as a miniature of the Order of Ismail). Owain identified this as the Order of the Star of Ethiopia in his post here of 6 December, 2017. See his comments in that post on the poor workmanship of this particular design (probably the same Spink & Son example). Obverse of this Order of the Star of Ethiopia that is misidentified in the Lot 1028 description on the Very Important Lot website as a miniature of the Order of Ismail. The ribbon is that for the Order of Ismail, rather than the red, yellow, & green appropriate for this Ethiopian medal. There are several significant similarities in this example to the one I illustrated on 6 December 2017 indicating it is probably the same piece from the Spink & Son December, 2017 auction. That auction description by Spink & Son identified what may be this exact piece as 25 mm high including the crown suspension X 16 mm wide. Reverse of this same Order of the Star of Ethiopia misidentified as a miniature Order of Ismail on the Very Important Lot auction site for Lot 1028. The description states that the silver purity mark on the reverse reads "935", however, it is probably "925", as identified in the Spink & Son auction description.
  12. Wow, what a fun assortment of chamberlain's pins! Of course, I also appreciate your putting a photo in with a silver Parquet version of the Mixed Courts judicial badge. This appears to be the same judicial badge that Mohamed Eissa illustrates in an artsy photo from Abdine Palace on his flickr site (https://www.flickr.com/photos/eissaphotos/3396138687/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/). Many thanks Owain. Below are a few images of chamberlains wearing these pins. Unfortunately none of the images provide any details of the pins, and they can only be recognized by their position and shape. Most of these images can be zoomed for at least some additional detail. Above is an undated photo of Queen Farida visiting the National Library. To the viewer's R is a Chamberlain wearing the chamberlain's pin on his R lapel. The Chamberlain looks a lot like an older Ismail Teymour Pasha. (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/1002210535/in/photostream) This scene is at the at the foot of the Tashrifah staircase, the 2 chamberlains on the far right are Said Zulificar Pasha (Grand Chamberlain) at the far R, and Ahmed Hassanein Pasha (Premier Chamberlaisn) just to the viewer's left of the Grand Chamberlain. Both can be seen wearing the chamberlains' pins on their R lapels. (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12889139@N08/3010690482/in/photostream/) King Farouk I's Grand Chamberlain's Cabinet in the 1920s. This image can be zoomed to making reading the names & titles easier. (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/8155481320, courtesy of Mrs. Dahlia Zulfikar) A higher resolution image of the same Grand Chamberlain's Cabinet of King Farouk I, but lacking the identifications of all the individuals as in the above, lower-resolution image. (From: ttps://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/2819700285/in/photostream, courtesy of Ms. Maha Mahmoud) Letterhead for the Cabinet of the Grand Chamberlain (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/9011781015/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/) A group of Court Officials during King Farouk I's reign wearing what appear to be chamberlain's pins on their R lapels. (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/8395692018/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/, courtesy of Mr. Aly Zulfikar) To get back to the Order of Ismail, below are 2 images of named individuals wearing the Order of Ismail, a couple photographs of King Farouk I's personal regalia of the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail, and a photo of an individual wearing the Order of Ismail at a royal banquet whose name is given in an Arabic label above him. A photo from King Farouk I's 18th birthday celebration in 1938. From L to R are: Princess Nimatalla Mukhtar (1876–1945), Farouk's paternal aunt; King Farouk I wearing the Collar, sash, and breast star (visible in other photos from this celebration) of the Order of Mohamed Ali; Queen Farida (1921-1988) wearing the Grand Cordon sash and badge of the Order of el-Kamal in brilliants; Sultana Melek (1869–1956), widow of Sultan Hussein Kamel, Farouk's paternal uncle; wearing the Grand Cordon sash and badge of Order of el-Kamal; Prince Soliman Daoud wearing the breast star of the Order of Ismail, possibly with the sash of that Order indicating the Grand Cordon Class. (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/5666876587/). The Grand Chamberlain Said Zulificar Pasha in his Chamberlain's coat wearing the breast star of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Ismail in superior position on his right breast, along with his many other awards. This is a cropped image from pg. 206 of The Graphic, November 12, 1930 that features a number of Egyptian "Notables". At the time, Said Zulificar was the Grand Chamberlain to King Fuad I. The Le Mondain Ègyptien: the Egyptian Who's Who: L' Annuaire de l' Elite d' Egypt. F. E. Noury & Fils, le Caire for 1939 identifies the following awards for Said Zulificar Pasha (pg. 388): Grand Cordon of the Order of Mohamed Ali, Grand Cordon of the Order of Ismail, Grand Cordon of the Order of the Nile, Grand Cordon of the Belgian Order of Leopold II, Grand Cordon of the Iranian Order of Homayoun, the 1st Class Syrian Medal of Honor, and the 1st Class Lebanese Medal of Honor and Merit. (cropped from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/7762810122/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/) Photo of the 3 awards belonging to King Farouk I that he probably wore more than any other decorations. Upper L is the sash and sash badge of the Grand Cordon Order of Mohamed Ali, upper R shows detail of some of the Collar of Mohamed Ali, lower R is a piece that was worn inside of the pendant on the Collar of the Order of Mohamed Ali featuring King Farouk I's cypher surmounted by Egypt's royal crown; middle row far L is the breast star of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Mohamed Ali; middle center is King Farouk I's breast star of the Grand Cordon Order of Ismail; lower L is the breast star of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of the Nile. From: : https://www.flickr.com/photos/27031646@N08/2521809470/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/) A low-resolution photo of King Farouk I's Grand Cordon Order of Ismail breast star (L) and sash badge (R). These are identified as from the Alexandria National Museum. (Cropped from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/36914349@N04/4397389512/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/) A photo of a Royal Banquet in honor of the Crown Prince Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran (5th from R, next to King Farouk I). The man in round glasses 3rd from King Farouk I's R is wearing a breast star of the Order of Ismail. Perhaps one of the Arab speakers on GMIC could provide the name of this individual by zooming this image. (From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43829903@N02/4047823450/in/pool-egyptianroyalty/)
  13. I believe I may have identified 2 individuals in two of the best portraits of Mixed Courts judges that have been posted on this thread. I have previously posted 2 of these portraits of one Egyptian judge and Egyptian Zogist posted the other of a European judge, but will add them here as well for reference. These visual identifications are based principally on photographic information from the interesting volume celebrating the 50th anniversary off the Egyptian Mixed Courts, published in 1926 that I referenced for the photo of Mahmoud Said in my post of 5 March, 2019 (Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le :journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926). While my comparisons are hardly ironclad, I have been searching other images for some time trying to see if it was possible to identify these 2 individuals. One of the greatest difficulties is that these portraits (the first 2 photos below and the painted portrait that is the 5th image below) were made when the judges were young (probably ~1911), and the best photos I have found with possible matches date from ~1926. The same is true comparing Judge Crabitès, whose 1911 portrait at the time of his initial appointment to the District Courts in Cairo (age 34) differ's markedly from how he looked when the 7th photo below was taken, probably c1926. I would not post this if I did not feel there is a very good chance that the individuals depicted in these portraits that show excellent details of the judicial costumes of the Mixed Courts' judges are the Judges I may have been able to identify through the detailed information available in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume. These 2 studio portraits above, made in the Jean Weinberg Studio in Cairo, were offered on eBay auctions by shebacoin between ~October 2017-September 2018. They show an unnamed Egyptian judge wearing the green sash of the Appeals Court. I believe they represent Judge Mahmoud El Toayar Bey. I have compared faces and body girth for the Egyptian judges who appear in photos of the Appeals Court in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume, and while the images below show a slightly older man, I think the similarities make this a high probability that the studio portraits above are of Judge Mahmoud El Toayar Bey. No other Egyptian judge in the Appeals Court photos from the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume show a better match in their facial features (especially the eyes, eyebrows, mouth, chin and cheeks) and robust body to those seen in the studio portraits above of the unnamed Egyptian Appeals Court judge. Judge Mahmoud El Toayar Bey was appointed as Chief of the Parquet of Mansourah in November 1911, transferred to the Cairo in February, 1913, and was promoted to the Court of Appeals in May, 1922. His role on the Appeals Court appears to have been as Conseiller (advisor) to the Court, possibly not as a judge. Several additional photos in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume also appear to show some court advisors wearing the same judicial garb as judges. Mahmoud El Toayar Bey is shown as the fourth man from the near end on the left side of the table (1st man on that side from the near end wearing a tarboosh). This image can be zoomed for a somewhat more detailed view. The other judges are: Mohamed Bahi El Dine Barakat Bey (Egypt), Constant van Ackere (Belgium), Bernard Favenc (France), Mahmoud El Toayar Bey (Egypt), Richard Augustus Vaux (Britain), Abdel Aziz Kahil Pacha (Egypt), Fouad Gress Bey (Egypt), Michael Hansson (Norway, Vice President, see also the photo Judge Hansson in my post of 3, May 2018 in this thread), Nicolas Cambas (Greece, President), Firmin van den Bosch (Belgium, Procureur Général), Soubhi Ghali Bey (Egypt), Ralph Bertie Peter Cator (Britain), Moustapha Behram Bey (Egypt), Alexander Cockburn McBarnet (Britain), Jasper Yeates Brinton (USA, his portrait painted by Mahmoud Said [see above post of 5 March 2019] is shown in my post of 1 December, 2016), Giovanni Baviera (Italy), and Don Enrique Garcia de Hereros (Spain). At the far right is M. G. Coroni Bey, the Chief Clerk. (Above photo from: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 191). Mahmoud El Toayar Bey is shown in this 1926 courtroom photo as the 4th judge seated from the left end of the semicircular bench. This image also can be zoomed, but the additional details of Judge Toayar Bey are not terrific. The other judges are (L-R): Firmin van den Bosch (Belgium, Procureur Général), Constant van Ackere (Belgium), Richard Augustus Vaux (Britain), Mahmoud El Toayar Bey (Egypt), Jasper Yeates Brinton (USA), Ralph Bertie Peter Cator (Britain), Soubhi Ghali Bey (Egypt), Michael Hansson (Norway, Vice President), Nicolas Cambas (Greece, President), Fuad Gress Bey (Egypt), Moustapha Behram Bey (Egypt), Abdel Aziz Kahil Pacha (Egypt), Giovanni Baviera (Italy), Bernard Favenc (France), Mohamed Bahi El Dine Barakat Bey (Egypt), and Don Enrique Garcia de de Hereros (Spain). In front of the judges are the lawyers for the plaintiff, and nearest the camera are the clerks, some lawyers (wearing the French chausse à bourrelet or, more commonly it is called the épitoge, roughly the French version of the academic hood in British and American usage), and an interpreter. (Above photo from: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 198). Mahmoud El Toayar Bey also is identified in the Le Mondain Ègyptien: the Egyptian Who's Who: L' Annuaire de l' Elite d' Egypt. F. E. Noury & Fils, le Caire for 1939 (pg. 361), 1941 (pg. 272) and 1943 (pg. 246) as having been awarded the Grand Officer Class of the Italian Order of the Crown, the Grand Officer of the Tunisian Order of Glory (Nichan Iftikhar), the Spanish Cross of Isabella the Catholic, and the Knight of the Swedish Royal Order of the Polar Star. Those same three issues of Le Mondain Egyptian also identify him as a former legal advisor to the Appeals Court, indicting that he must have retired form his judicial career before 1939. Unfortunately, I currently have little additional information about Mahmoud El Toayar Bey. Egyptian Zogist posted this portrait on 23 November, 2016 in this thread. I have found several versions of this portrait on Pinterest (for example: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/410460953518450951/?lp=true). All of these borrowed images identify the individual incorrectly as Abbas Hilmi II. The red sash and the gold and silver judicial badge clearly indicates this is a judge of one of the District Courts. The individual looks European. I have not found any other versions of this portrait, other than the several Pinterest examples that all misidentify the subject as Khedive Abbas Hilmi II. After searching several photos, I believe this may represent Raoul Houriet, a Swiss judge on the District Courts of Cairo. I believe that there is a strong resemblance between the painted portrait above and a couple photographs of Judge Raoul Houriet in the Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926 volume. These 2 pictures (above and below) show an older man than in the painted portrait above, but the similarity in nose, chin, chin dimple (somewhat visible in this photo), mustaches, and glasses in these couple photos seem a very good match with the portrait. Some aspects of Houriet's ear in the above image are the only facial element that contrasts with the above painted portrait. He is not listed in the 1939, 1941, or 1943 Le Mondain Ègyptien: the Egyptian Who's Who: L' Annuaire de l' Elite d' Egypt. F. E. Noury & Fils, le Caire, that also has photos of certain notable individuals (Egyptians and foreigners). I have not found another individual's portrait that seems to match the painted portrait of a younger judge better than these couple images of Raoul Houriet. This image can be zoomed, but the detail is not much better in enlarged views. Raoul Houriet lived in Egypt from 1910-1937. He was appointed to the District Courts in Cairo in May of 1916, and made the President of that Tribunal in January 1922. He became an Appeals Court judge in Alexandria in 1929. A small amount of information about Judge Houriet's judicial career in Egypt is published in: Zimmili Hardman, Esther, 2008. From Camp Caesar to Cleopatra’s Pool: A Swiss Childhod in Alexandria, 1934-1950. The Alexandria and Mediterranean Research Center Monogaphs 4. Biblioteca Alexandrina, in Les Tribunaux Mixtes et la Suisse. In Numéro Spécial du 1er Aout 1949 du Journal Suisse d’Égypte et du Proche-Orient. Alexandria: 1949, pp.79–81 avaialbe online at: https://www.bibalex.org/Attachments/Publications/Files/2013032015414960823_FromCampCeaesartoCleopatrasPool.pdf), and in: Shalash, Yehia. My Book Project: The Swiss Egyptians & The Egyptian Swiss The Theban Legion Story (book proposal). AAHA = Amicale Alexandrie Hier et Aujourd'hui. Cahier No 76 September 2014 (available at http://www.cealex.org/pfe/diffusion/PFEWeb/pfe_028/PFE_028_019_w.pdf). Mention of his role in sitting on the board selecting the architectural design for the Palace of Justice in Cairo, built between 1925 -1934, as the only representative of the Mixed Courts on the panel reviewing the submitted architectural designs is in a short article on the Palace of Justice by Samir Raafat in the Cairo Times of 2 April, 1998 (avaialbe at: http://www.egy.com/landmarks/98-04-02.php). (Above photo from: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 35). Raoul Houriet (Switzerland, President) is seated at the head of the table at the left end. This image can be zoomed for greater detail comparing Judge Houriet to the painted portrait above. Again, the facial configuration of nose, chin (and dimple), mustaches, and glasses seem to match the image of the younger judge in the painted portrait better than any other judges' images for the District Courts that I have been able to examine. The other judges in this photo are (from R to L, beginning with the individual on Judge Houriet's right, on the near side of the table): Mohamed Onsi Bey (Egypt, Chief of the Parquet), Pierre Crabitès (USA, my wife's great grandfather, see the 1911 portrait of a younger Judge Crabitès in the second photo of my post on 14 November, 2018), Mohamed Izzet Bey (Egypt), Abdel Latif Korchid Bey (Egypt), Mohamed Naguib Choukri Bey (Egypt), Mohamed Fouad Housny Bey (Egypt), Alfred Emile Frédéric Sandstroem (Sweden), George Arthur Warrington Booth (Britain), Léon Pierre Joseph Bassard (France), Constantin Vryakos (Greece), Charles Oger du Rocher (France), Halvard Nicolaï Heggen (Norway), Moustafa Neguib Bey (Egypt), Arthur Samson Preston (Britain), Hugues Holmes (Britain), Franco Gautero (Italy), Zaki Ghali Bey (Egypt), Niels Wilhelm Boëg (Denmark), Vincenzo Falqui-Cao (Italy), Georges Molotsvoff (Russia), Francis J. Peter (Switzerland, Vice President). To the left of President Houriet is M. Lucchesi Bey, Chief Clerk. (Above photo from: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926, pg. 193). Image of the judicial badge design on the back cover of the volume: Les Juridictions Mixtes d'Égypte 1876-1926: Livre d'or Édité sous le Patronage du Conseil de l’Ordre des Avocats á l’Occasion du Cinquantenaire des Tribunaux de la Réforme, par le journal des Tribunaux Mixtes. Alexandrie, Egypte, Février 1926.
  14. Below is another photo of Ahmen Hassanein wearing the Order of Ismail This is a photo taken on 27 November, 1939 of King Farouk I leaving the Egyptian Parliament building (L). The person just R of the King is Ahmed Hassanein Pasha in his Grand Chamberlain's uniform wearing the regalia of the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Nile and the breast star of the Grand Cordon Class of the Order of Ismail. It is difficult to identify the other chest medals he is wearing. On Hassanein's R shoulder is the Grand Chamberlain's pin worn when in attendance to the king. To the R of Hassanien saluting King Farouk is Aly Maher Pasha serving his second term as Prime Minister. From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/4765920110/in/photostream Above are images of 2 different examples of the Chamberlain's pin from the period when Farouk I was king, his cipher is the central design.This pin is worn on the right lapel when the Chamberlain is on duty serving the royal family (upper pin from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/20322111042/in/photostream; lower pin from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/12036519145/in/photostream
  15. Below is an image of a named Egyptian judge on the Mixed Courts. This undated photo shows Ambassador Sami Ali Aboulfetouh Bey (R) and Judge Ismail Ali Aboulfetouh Bey (L). I can find only a small amount of information about Sami Ali Aboulfetouh Bey, but Judge Ismail Aboulfetouh is listed in the 1941 and 1943 editions of Le Mondain Égyptien: The Egyptian Who's Who, L' Annuarie de l' Elite d' Egypt. (F.E. Nouri et Fils, le Caire: 1941: http://www.cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000055_I_w.pdf; 1943: http://cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000018_I_w.pdf; these listings also identify orders & decorations held by the individuals) as a judge of the Mixed Courts, living in Cairo. In this photo, Judge Aboulfetouh is wearing his tarboosh, a European-style formal jacket with white tie rather than the Egyptian-style long tunic, a bicolored sash, and probably a silver judicial badge. The bi-colored sash (green superior and red inferior) is that of the Parquet, although I cannot confirm some details of his appointments. The 1939 edition of Le Mondain Égyptien: The Egyptian Who's Who (https://www.yumpu.com/fr/document/view/39404410/lvr-000091-w/41) identifies Judge Ismail Aboulfetouh as the Chief of the Parquet in Alexandria. In the 1939 and 1941 editions of Le Mondain Égyptien: The Egyptian Who's Who, an individual named Samy Aboulfetouh is identified as an Assistant Director of the Section of European and American Affairs, in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Cairo. Samy Aboulfetouh also is identified in the 1941 publication as an Officer of the Iranian Order of the Crown. From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kelisli/9711242159/in/photostream (photo Courtesy of: Samia Ismail Aboulfetouh)
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