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pluribus

Estonian military badges 1919-1940. Top of the sphere.

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Dear Jerome,

They used several uniform types through the period 1917-1940.

Here are some later designs.

Best regards,

pluribus

ratsavorm.jpg

Here you can see the badges for the boots and a nice miniature of the Regimental badge.

By the way, badge of the Cavalry Regiment was the only one of the regimental badges which was awarded also to the soldiers of the regiment.

rr.jpg

Edited by pluribus

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Oh !

Many thanks for that, pluribus ! :cheers:

I knew about the red cavalry breeches, but that uniform color comes as a total surprise !

Cheers,

Jerome

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Hallo, just to say you have some fantastic pieces :love: in your collection, congratulations. Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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Thank you for the illustrations from the 1939 Regulation "Kaitsev?evormi kirjeldus vormikandmise m??rused". Do you happen to have the early 20's regulation too (at the time, insignia of rank for officers were worn on shoulders, not on sleeves and they had a stand-up collar too) ? THE book on the marvellous regimental badges from Estonia is, of course, the recently published "Eesti sojalised autasud ja rinnam?rgid 1918-1940" by Aleks Kivinuk(Tallinn, 2005), but I always thought the illustrations are a bit pale and blurred in this otherwise excellent book : the way the badges are pictured in this thread shows them in all their glory.

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G'da pluribus;

What is the significance of the suspension device and setup of the two badges in post #1 and 2? Is there some historical (Baltic) link to this style? It is very unusual.

I like the use of what is almost medievel symbology, does this also have a cultural link? Or is it just "tuff lookin".

Regards;

Johnsy

Edited by Tiger-pie

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G'da pluribus;

What is the significance of the suspension device and setup of the two badges in post #1 and 2? Is there some historical (Baltic) link to this style? It is very unusual.

I like the use of what is almost medievel symbology, does this also have a cultural link? Or is it just "tuff lookin".

Regards;

Johnsy

Hello Johnsy,

The significance of the suspension device is to avoid a rotation of the badge on the uniform. These badges have screw fastenings. You can see on one of my photos how the badge with the suspension device fastens to the uniform. Of course not only practical purposes were primary- the badges look better too.

Many of the Estonian military badges use an image of Nordic Eagle which comes from Estonian national epic.

The Estonian traditions of order are among the oldest ones in Europe reaching back to 1202 when the Order of the Brethren of the Sword was established.

So we can see German influences and also Russian because in 1710 (till 1918) Estonia was subordinated to the rule of the Russian Emperor.

You can see medieval coats of arms of the towns on the badges too.

Here is a badge of the 6th independent infantry batallion. Numbered on the back No.21

You can see a Nordic Eagle holding medieval coats of arms of Parnu county and Parnu city.

Thank you for your interest!

pluribus

Edited by pluribus

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A reverse of the badge.

Edited by pluribus

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One of the most rare Estonian badges and probably of all pilot`s wings in the world. 17 men only graduated the Estonian Flight school in 1921. I know only two badges existing in collections. One is here.

Silver, gold, enamels. Multipiece construction. Screwback. Height 47 mm.

Edited by pluribus

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A badge of Defence League Sakalamaa regional unit.

Screwback. Numbered on the reverse no. 72. Makermarked Roman Tavast.

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A badge of the 1st Artillery Group.

Numbered no. 111 on the reverse. Makermarked Roman Tavast.

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Badge of the Ordnance Board.

Numbered no.56. Makermarked Aleksander Karja.

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Very impressive designs.

Thank you for posting them, I very much enjoy looking at these.

Jan

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Very impressive designs.

Thank you for posting them, I very much enjoy looking at these.

Jan

Jan,

Thank you for your interest. We are on the half-way, more to come.

pluribus

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Defence League- Badge of the Tallinn regional unit Orcherstra.

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Defence League- Badge of the Narva subunit Narva regular unit.

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Beautiful badges and workmanship, pity they are so rare.

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Beautiful badges and workmanship, pity they are so rare.

Thanks. I have same feelings, pity they are so rare. Only few collectors worldwide collect this subject due to scarcity of the material. If anybody would like to start with collecting of Estonian 1920-1940 ODM, then a good selection is available in http://www.emedals.ca/catalog.asp?country=E

(Attention! One of the badges is not 1920-40 period)

pluribus

Edited by pluribus

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Badge of the 4th Artillery Group.

Numbered no.30. Makermarked Roman Tavast.

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A Badge of the School of Non-Commissioned Officers.

Makermarked Roman Tavast.

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Defence League- Badge of the Ida subunit of the Tallinn regional unit.

Makermarked Roman Tavast. Numbered no.93

Edited by pluribus

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Defence League- Badge of L??nemaa Territorial unit.

Makermarked Roman Tavast.

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If I wanted to collect these badges (and I do wish I could), whats the chance of ever finding them for sale?

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If I wanted to collect these badges (and I do wish I could), whats the chance of ever finding them for sale?

As said in previous posts:

If anybody would like to start with collecting of Estonian 1920-1940 ODM, then a good selection is available in http://www.emedals.ca/catalog.asp?country=E

(Attention! One of the badges is not 1920-40 period).

I have few doubles too.

pluribus

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