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Hello,

This is a very rare enlistment document for the army of Texas dated 1837. The volunteer was born in Ireland and signed for the duration of the war with Mexico. The Texas army consisted of around 1500 soldiers.

thanks,

barry

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Thanks Paul :D

Hello Ed,

I don't collect medals but I wouldn't mind having one of those. Any Idea of how many were awarded. They were probably not given to the dead. I estimate that around 7500 Mexican soldiers fought during 1836.

1500 Mexican soldiers at Goliad

6000 Mexican soldiers at the Alamo

plus those in the Navy

thanks,

barry

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Hello Ed,

I don't collect medals but I wouldn't mind having one of those. Any Idea of how many were awarded. They were probably not given to the dead. I estimate that around 7500 Mexican soldiers fought during 1836.

1500 Mexican soldiers at Goliad

6000 Mexican soldiers at the Alamo

plus those in the Navy

thanks,

barry

Wish I knew. Out of my territory. It is my sense that this particular example was an officer's star (as opposed to what the enlisted personnel received). As I recall, it sold well (WELL) into five figures (pounds).

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And dont forget our final victory at San Jacinto... About 750 Texans performed a successful attack on an encampment of the Mexican Army consisting of about 1500 soldiers

About 700 Mexican soldiers were killed, another 200 were wounded, and over 730 prisoners were taken(including General Santa Anna himself)!

I did not know that this medal was awarded to the Mexicans, since they were defeated and lost most of their northern territory. I am willing to bet that Ed's example is now a one of a kind piece. I am sure that the owner will be hold on to it for while!

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From that fine Victorian framing, I presume he was not later one of the San Patricios. :unsure::catjava:

Any way to check Texas military records (pension, etc) for genealogical data on him?

He was a BIG Irishman and would have been a welcome addition!

One of the oddities I've found with looking through Civil War receords up here is how universal "dark" is for remarks on complexion. Blue eys, "fair" (when on earth did "blond" come into use?) hair... always "dark."

Because they worked outside in the sun their entire lives. :rolleyes:

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I'd say no also on the San Patricios. He probably received a nice chunk of land for his service. I was thinking of taking the document out of the frame in order to check the backside but it looks glued on the board. Usually they have some sort of info on the back of this type of document. I know that alot of American Revolution docs have proof of service remarks located on the backside when they went seeking a pension.

I've checked the Texas Confederates and death certificates without any luck.

thanks,

barry

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Hello Ed,

I'll keep the glass. :D I used some windex and it cleaned up. It must have been framed/reframed in the 50's because behind the document it had an old file folder with a piece of plastic still attached as padding.

thanks,

barry

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  • 8 months later...

While searching I found this old article of some missing items.

DALLAS (Nov. 30, 2007) -- The Dallas Historical Society (DHS) is seeking information leading to the return of 21 items from its permanent collection that were removed from the Hall of State in Fair Park recently. DHS officials are cooperating with a Dallas Police Department investigation.

The items include historic photographs, documents and artifacts relating to the very earliest days of the Texas Republic and the history of Dallas. They include a pair of spurs confiscated from the tent of Gen. Antonio L?pez de Santa Anna and later presented by Gen. Sam Houston to a friend after the 1836 Battle of San Jacinto near Houston where Texas won its independence from Mexico.

The society is offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the collection's return. Anyone with information should call CrimeStoppers at 1-877-373-TIPS (8477) or any police department.

DHS Executive Director Michael Duty said, "Our primary and overriding concern is the safe return of these objects. They are extremely significant to the history of Texas and Dallas. Many are literally unique items and are irreplaceable. We consider these items to be essential to the fulfillment of our mission, and we are doing all we can to assure their safe return. We are contacting a wide range of galleries, museums, auction houses, antique and antiquity dealers, and private collectors with detailed information and photographs of the missing objects."

A review of collection records and a search of storage areas as well as the entire Hall of State have not turned up any other missing items. Missing are:

Spurs -- Mexican President Santa Anna's brass dress spurs recovered after the Battle of San Jacinto, gifted by Gen. Sam Houston to his friend H. L. Garland. Very good condition. Engraved "H. L. Garland From his Friend Sam Houston."

a.. Paperweight -- Santa Anna's desk paperweight recovered after the Battle of San Jacinto. Brass, patinated, a reposed fawn on a rectangular block.

a.. Candlestick holder -- Tin, handheld. Tin has rusted. Santa Anna's candlestick holder recovered after the Battle of San Jacinto.

a.. Mexican Medal of Honor -- Silver, 1836. Sometimes called the Santa Anna Cross, consisting of an eagle holding cross, with six red enamel radiants, reads on the back "Al Valor Acreditado en Texas," on the front "Al Merito 1836."

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I hope to have this one soon.

Republic of Texas

On the 27th day of June 1836 before me Benjamin C. Franklin Judge in & for the district of Brazos appeared Hugh Miller Late of Capt Romans Camp. 1st Regt Texas Army ? and required a certificate of Citizenship; Now let it be known to all whom it may in any with concern that the said Hugh Miller is a Citizen of the Republic of Texas and as such entitled to the rights, privileges, & benefits granted & secured to citizens by the laws of the Republic. The Evidence whereof I sign this Instrument with assisting witnesses the day & year above written.

Private Hugh Miller, of Captain A. Richard Roman?s 1st Regiment, had fought at the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836. Miller was killed at Quintana, Brazoria County, in 1837.

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Hello,

This is a very rare enlistment document for the army of Texas dated 1837. The volunteer was born in Ireland and signed for the duration of the war with Mexico. The Texas army consisted of around 1500 soldiers.

thanks,

barry

Two vaguely related tidbits:

James Thom, an historian and writer from Indiana has written a very decent novel on the San Patricios called "Saint Patrick's Battalion" and illustrated with his own drawings. Quite a good read! and published in 2006-07, so still easily available.

Many years ago my wife and I were given a tour of bits of downtown London by a chap I knew and one of the more fascinating stops was in an alley/entrance way to a block of flats. The wll bears a plaque, "not even the taxi drivers know about' my friend claimed, commemorating "The site of the Legation of the Republic of Texas to the Court of St. James" and the dates - 3 or 4 years - which I can't recall. Really cool!

Peter

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