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Don Correct Yhe same design except square. One was WHW 1944 with only the red eagle. The other was larger and rectangular/square with the black eagle and bullseye on the left and the red eagle on the right. Both were unmarked. I have his telephone so I might just take a gamble. The only problem is that he will only allow returns if I prove they are reproductions. Logic dictates that they are probably not but they could be fantasy. Thanks for your help. Robert

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I would have went for that Kreisscheissen too as I see that both the front and reverse show honest and equal wear. The first thing I noticed was how the finish on the attaching pin has worn off in just the right places when it was worn. That is a nice piece sir. :love:

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Sometimes we do just have to work on our gut feeling & take a gamble.

Neither of the badges in the last couple of threads are mine, they are all images from the archive I keep for reference & for occasions like this :P . As I said before, I had doubts about them, but it seems that they are OK, which is great as now I have to find some of these for my collection as well as all the other tirol badges :angry::P

Cheers

Don

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  • 7 months later...

This arrived today, a stunning 1939 silver version. At this time it was still just the "Landesschiessen" & wasn't divided down to particular events.

 

Again, the pictures do not do this piece justice.

 

Cheers

Don

post-116-1172163385.jpg

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Nice collection Don. I have side stepped these for years for one reason or the other but the last one you show the 1939 is an eye catcher and I just may have to keep my eyes open for an example. :beer:

--dj--Joe

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  • 2 months later...

For anyone interested I am now able to supply names of many of the recipients of the numbered Gaumeister badges from 1941-1944. I've managed to locate some documents with most of the winners & badges issued for these years, 1944 is complete with the other years less so...... I also have a few details of the 3 year Gaumeister recipients but the list is also not complete.

 

Below: Gaumeister 1942 #1043 issued to Karl Quoo?, of Bregenz.........

post-116-1183571749.jpg

 

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A nice badge with documentation. It doesn't really get any better than that. Kudos to you sir. Robert

PS I will now add this badge to my list of wants when I attend a show next week. For some unknown reason, these shooting badges are generally not that popular. Hard to explain.. :jumping:

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Robert,

If you track down a '44 badge I will be definitely be able to give you a name if the badge was issued (as with all badges there were spares that were not issued) as I have the names of all 2337 recipients for that year.

The odds of putting a name to a number for the years preceding '44 lessen with each year as the list is less complete, however I'm hoping that sometime in the future I'll have the complete list as I now know what documents I need to look for.

Cheers

Don

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Picked this one up with a bunch of tinnies, I was unsure, but the price on the lot made it a reasonable gamble. Any ideas?

The maker mark says ""Pichl Klammer Insbruck"

 

Regards,

Pete

post-326-1183677907.jpg

 

Edited by Scowen
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Nice badge Pete. I can't find out any info on these badges to indicate what they were for. My original thinking was that they were the "event" badge, much like a tinnie. However they come with & without the oak leaf surround, & there's evidence to show that they may well have come in silver as well as gold.... So perhaps not a tinnie type badge after all.

I was sceptical about them but if you check out post #2 you will see that I got 2 of these in with a grouping I purchased sometime ago. Using the documents I obtained the other day, I was able to ascertain that all of the 5 large Meisterschütze badges were indeed awarded to the same man, so it is possible that these 2 were originally part of the grouping & not "thrown in" later.

Is your one magnetic?

Cheers

Don

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  • 1 month later...

Any thing new and exciting from Tirol ? All grouped together these can be quite spectacular.

Don, your collection, enthusiasm and knowledge of these awards has prompted me to add at least one example to my collection.

--dj--Joe

Edited by --dj--Joe
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Any thing new and exciting from Tirol ? All grouped together these can be quite spectacular.

Don, your collection, enthusiasm and knowledge of these awards has prompted me to add at least one example to my collection.

--dj--Joe

I will return to Finland from my several weeks trip of medal hunting around the world. I got nice lot of these badges and will post them here as soon as I am back in Finland by wednesday.

Greetings from hot Houston,

Jani

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Thank you Joe, I look forward to seeing you first piece! :jumping:

 

Not new but un-posted here, these are the 3 year Gaumeistersch?tze mini & full size badges. Awarded only in 1943 & '44, these were given for attaining the grade & badge of Meistersch?tze 3 years in a row. Identical designs exist for 6 years & 9 years however, obviously these were never awarded due to the end of the regime...... This Piece was awarded to Josef Flotzinger of M?nchen who's cased set of Meistersch?tze can be seen on the previous pages.

 

Jani,

 

I look forward to seeing you collection of Tirol Badges.

 

Cheers

Don

 

post-116-1187014004.jpg

 

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Nice looking set! Don, Is there a rule of thumb about base metal materials used? Perhaps a break down by years? I know some to be made of zinc base metal due to the color loss. As reported by Pete, a magenetic badge, and your 1939 silver badge. Was a tombac base metal used on early awards?

Much to learn before I dive in. :)

--dj--Joe

The enamel work appears to be high quality.

Edited by --dj--Joe
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A very good question Joe, & not an easy one to answer rolleyes.gif

Let's start at the top.

First of all as far as I & others who collect them can tell, these have not yet been faked (probably due to the lack of interest in them). So there shouldn't be any real fears in starting a collection of them......

1938

Of the three badges that I've examined so far (the small 4cm bronze, & larger 5cm bronze & silvers) all are non magnetic.

1939:

The badges marked AG & Co München are magnetic, however the unmarked badges from a different, as yet unknown maker are non magnetic.

1940

All of the badges I've encountered so far are magnetic.

1941 -1944 badges with distictions or disciplines written on them (pistole etc):

Curiously, the standard 1941 badges (bronze, silver, gold) I've handled so far are not magnetic (full size), although the gold with oakleaves is magnetic...... However with the exception of the 1944's which I haven't collected yet, all the other years are magnetic (full size & mini).

Meisterschütze 1941 - 1944, both sizes:

These are a zinc based metal of varying quality & therefore non magnetic.

3 Year Gaumeisterschütze

These are strange beasts. The mini is non magnetic, however the full size has a magnetic centre (enamelled section) & a non magnetic wreath :unsure:

The small shield shaped badges 1941-1944

These are magnetic

The small round lapel sized badges with Standesschützen Verbandes on with dates 1940-1941

The ones I have encountered so far are non magnetic.

So there you are, I said it wasn't easy......

Cheers

Don

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Managed to pick up a couple of 1943 bronze badges this week.

 

The bronze are the hardest grades of the 1941-'44 badges to find. There seem to be plenty of the gold & gold with oakleaves, but silver & especially bronze are hard to locate. This is probably due to the fact that the shoot could be repeated to achieve a higher level if the participant wished to do so. Lower grade badges could be exchanged for free for a higher grade badge once the appropriate score required had been reached (bronze for silver, silver for gold etc). If however the participent wanted to keep an awarded lower grade badge & also receive the next grade up he/she would have to pay for any higher grade badges awarded. One badge was included free with cost of the Stammkarte/entry fee for that discipline.

 

Cheers

Don

post-116-1187192505.jpg

 

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