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I think its a Serbian Royal Guards Badge, Probobly Pre Yugoslavia.

It has the same outline as the "Medaile za zásluhy o Knížecí a Kralovský dvůr"

or in English "Medal for the Service to the Royal Household"

Which was instituted by the King, it also has his monogram in Latin

Edited by Rogi
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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...

Your welcome ;) was glad i could help a bit. I found something similar a month ago but my computer went down and couldnt find it again, if ebay still keeps the old auctions will try and find it again for you.

Edited by Rogi
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I'm not really sure what's that piece. Coat of arms is from kingdom era and the motto connects it with Obrenović dynasty, so it should be from 1882-1903 period. I'm not convinced that Barper emblem is really from cartridge pouch. The Yugoslav ones I've seen look little bit different, I could be wrong but I think all of them had smaller double-headed eagle and a wreath around it. Here's an example from "Official Dress in Serbia" (original title: Службено одело у Србији 19. и 20. века). As for the emblem on the cross belt I think it had suspension ring on the top of the crown and upper corners of the cloak (see the 2nd photo).

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05.jpg

Edited by paja
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Here's one more interesting photo from the book "Guards in Serbia" (Гарда у Србији 1829-1945).
Three types of the cross belt and cartridge pouches, from top to bottom, 1850s, M1861, M1903 (Military Museum Belgrade).01.JPG02.JPG

Edited by paja
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And one more illustration from the Official Military Gazette (1900). You can see wreath underneath the double-headed eagle here as well. Considering that your emblem has suspension ring perhaps it's from the cross belt but I can't say for sure.
Anyway it looks very well made and I doubt it's a modern repro whatever it might be.
03.jpg

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Sorry for not replying sooner, that would be my guess but unfortunately I really can't say for sure. 
All in all, interesting and beautiful piece, thanks for sharing it with us.

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  • 6 months later...

One like yours got sold over ebay couple of weeks ago, you can find it here.

Seller's description:
"Very Rare WW1 French Commemorative Medal For Serbia 

During WW1, as a way of fundraising, the French Government authorised groups to organize nationwide days that became known as "Journées". These days normally helped to raise funds for French soldiers (les Poilus), their wives and children. Other days were set aside to raise funds for allied forces such as Belgium and, in particular Serbia - a country that suffered devastating military and civilian casualties. By the end of 1915, it was estimated that one sixth of the country's population was dead.

This beautiful and rare hollowed white metal medal measures 43 x 34 mm and has the Serbian Royal Coat of Arms which consists of two main heraldic symbols representing the national identity of the Serbian people across the centuries - the Serbian eagle (a white double-headed eagle adopted from the Nemanjić dynasty) and the Serbian cross. It bears the legend "Tempus Et Meum Jus" (The Time Is Right), the motto of Milan Obrenović who was the ruler of Serbia from 1868 to 1889, first as Prince (1868-1882), subsequently as King Milan I (1882-1889)."
s-l1600.jpg
s-l1600 (1).jpg

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I have some doubts regarding the badge depicted. First, it bears the coat of arms of the defunct Dynasty, which disappeared in 1903, some 13 years prior to alleged manufacturing. Second, it is the coat of arms of the Obrenovich Royal House, not of the Kingdom of Serbia itself (observe the ouroboros, shield form and the motto). Third, notwithstanding possible errors and lack of knowledge, France of Great War period was not that uninformed or desinformed to struck a wartime ally commemorative badge with wrong armorial bearings, Fourth, whoever did the job was not particularly skilled or informed about heraldry, otherways one could not explain the curious position of the cords binding the mantle (look at the inner part of the mantle!).

Dragomir  

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