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bazsi

Victorian Infantry Tunic - Help Needed

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This tunic is my latest item in my collection.

It looks like an infantry tunic from 1889 without shoulder boards, and a badge also missing from the lower part of the right sleeve.

There is a stamping on the inside which reads 'RBR 1889'. What do you think RBR stands for? Is it Royal Berkshire Regiment or Border Regiment or something else?

The place of the badge looks like a bandsman badge. What do you think?

Thanks,

Balazs

 

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Edited by bazsi

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57 minutes ago, Mike McLellan said:

Haven’t a clue, but very, very nice. 
Mike. 

Thank you Mike. Yes it is a very nice tunic, luckily in a very good condition.

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Hello bazsi, A question ,the lace on collar and cuffs is made of gold thread ? The silhouette and position of the absent insignia appears to be that of a WO1 badge of rank, the quality of the tunic points in the same direction .apart from that, the cuffs are not pointed so it is not a Royal Berkshire Regiment Tunic , the buttons are not of the RBR too

The buttons bear the crest of arms with queen Victorias crown , this fact dates the buttons until 1901

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Hello Bayern,

Thank you for your help. Yes, the laces are made of gold thread. It wasn't in my mind that the absent badge could a WO1 badge be, but you are right, it is the most possible solution.

The impact of the collar badges are also different from the Royal Berlshire Regiment.

Edited by bazsi

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Hello bazsi, well WO1 but in which unit ? the question persists .

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It’s much too tempting to assume that RBR stands for Royal Something Regiment. After we eliminate the obvious Berkshire, Borders, Bermuda, etc , there are very few to zero in upon, even among the amalgamated regiments. I would almost wager that it was not a Royal regiment, but rather a privately sponsored entity with or without official endorsement. I think that it’s also safe to say that it is now defunct but still within the grasp of a zealous historian. Good luck!

Mike. 

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Posted (edited)

Sgt Major tunic. 1881 pattern. Badge would have been a crown not normally with anything below it. Perhaps there was a qualification badge below the crown.

Edited by colonelhavok

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Posted (edited)

"I would almost wager that it was not a Royal regiment, but rather a privately sponsored entity with or without official endorsement."

As Colonel Havok says, it looks a lot like a Pattern 1881 tunic and Sgt Major [no 'WO1] would make sense.  The painted 'RBR' etc is a classic British Army marking style, from the use of white paint to the shape of the letters/numbers used. 

I can't solve the 'RBR' mystery but I can't see any reason NOT to think it's British Army issue. :)

Edited by peter monahan

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Thank you Gents for your opinion and help.

A fellow forum member from another forum has helped me. He's opinion is a Pattern 1881 Royal Berkshire Regiment Bandmaster (Sergeant Major) tunic. The missing badge is the bandmaster's badge with he laurel wreath, lyra and the crown.

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