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Linasl

Spanish pilot badge - Spanish Civil War

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Posted (edited)

Hello.  Is this a set of Spanish Pilot's Badge from the Spanish Civil War?  If it is, which side (Franco or other)?

Made of gold (marked 750) and silver (marked 925) - see photos.

The amount of gold and silver are significant, this large badge is heavy. 

Can you please verify date and any other information that would be useful in properly identifying it?

Thank you.  Linas

 

span air 1.jpg

span air 2.jpg

span air 3.jpg

span air 4.jpg

span air 5.jpg

span air 6.jpg

Edited by Linasl

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Linasi ,go to my post of May 25 in the Spain section answering to someone asking about Spanish pilot wings

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Hello.  Thanks for your reply.  You said:

Hello ,the badge is called the Rokiski , or Roquisqui  for the name of a certain Mr Rokiski ,of Polish ancestry who in 1939 redesigned the Aviatiors badge first designed in 1919 . The badge was designed by Infante Don Alfonso de Orleans ,his wife and two officers of the Spanish Aviation Captains Kindelan and Herrera . the inspiration is Egyptian .the red sun and the wings of a Ibis . from 1919 to 1931 it carried over the Royal Crown ,from 1931 to 1936 a mural crown , then a red star for the Republicans and for the Nationalists a ST john eagle . In 1939 again Crown but open topped , this lasted until 1975 . from 1975 to today is used again in his 1919 model

So it this the Royal Crown or Mural Crown or Crown but open topped?

Sorry, I don't know the different.

Thanks.  Linas

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Posted (edited)

The crown of this piece is used between 1946-1977 (open royal crown). The gilt 5 points star over the the propeller blades denote the aditionnal qualification of "observer"

 

Wings for the period 1938-1946 (open royal crown)

blob.png.5b471005626cf330968aa18f9ff05181.pngInsert other media

 

Wing 1937-1938 for the Republican Air Force

blob.png.be736f8eb3e6a4e3c0b9007ce780e2af.png

 

Wing 1936-1937

blob.png.f70ad9efcc3815761013ca7471a9c57b.png

 

Wing 1913-1931 (royal crown)

blob.png.a124a89a31fd2bf76ac8020aad36d57e.png

 

Edited by Antonio Prieto

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Hello Antonio.

Thanks for the information.

So they made badges of real gold and silver from 1946-77?

Linas

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Posted (edited)

I understand what the red star means when it's on the top of the badge, but what does a gold star stand for when it's in the middle of the propellers, like it is on Linasl's badge?  Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex

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Posted (edited)

The red star above the emblem was used on various aviation badges in 1937 and 1938. A gold star on the propellers is that which marks the observer course as well as the pilot course. 

 

Of the wings model 1938 exist copies of Paul Meybauer

In the same way there are indeed copies of jewelry made by Rokiski.

image001.jpg.ea8a1ca3b65b2cada83fd7a2abb3ccc7.jpg

image003.jpg.7b054d759707b3e82a73cd76b9f36156.jpg

Emblem of the Spanish Air Force, with four bladed gold propeller on a red enamelled circle, circumscribed a ring of sixteen zircons, in groups of four between the blades. Golden royal crown. Museum of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Collection: ES-DFMMAA. Signature: MAA-4165

image005.jpg.3655fe27e02ae951d4e07cdba06ce765.jpg

Edited by Antonio Prieto

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Antonio - when I clicked on your links, nothing happened.

I am very confused right now.  What is the date of this pilot/observer badge?

If it is post WW2, was it custom to use precious metal like gold and silver?

Thanks.  Linas

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Antonio Prieto said:

The red star above the emblem was used on various aviation badges in 1937 and 1938. A gold star on the propellers is that which marks the observer course as well as the pilot course. 

Thank you very much for the clarification.  I have never in my life seen a star on the propeller of a Spanish Air Force badge before.  It's fascinating to know that it's a pilot/observer badge!!  I must also tell you, that I cannot see your attachments.  Maybe you could try to convert them to JPEG format.  Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex

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Linasl . The use of silver and gold denotes a specially made Badge. commisioned for someone .usually badges of such quality have on the reverse the name or seal of the manufacturer .the gold star was authorized in 1927 to distinguish the Observers. 

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Posted (edited)

Edited post with the images

The emblem of the first image corresponds to the pilot and observer courses. It is after the Second World War, and made of silver, surely by an officer who wanted something more quality in the badge and had the money to pay the jeweler or artist. But this model does not look like Rokiski, because it does not bear the marks that it included in its pieces, as can be seen in one of the images
 
 
Edited by Antonio Prieto

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17 hours ago, Antonio Prieto said:

Edited post with the images

The emblem of the first image corresponds to the pilot and observer courses. It is after the Second World War, and made of silver, surely by an officer who wanted something more quality in the badge and had the money to pay the jeweler or artist. But this model does not look like Rokiski, because it does not bear the marks that it included in its pieces, as can be seen in one of the images
 
 

I agree Antonio.Rokiski ever put his tradename .

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