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Hello Chris,

Those are some fantastic pictures. They are all armed to the teeth. The only thing I new about the Boer War until recently was a movie(I can't remember the name) about some British soldiers accused of war crimes and are executed in the end. Every few years I'll catch it on television.

Here is a link I found looking for train wrecking.

http://abw.netfirms.com/photos.htm

thanks,

barry

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Great photos Chris,keep them coming they are very interesting as you do not see many photos of the Boers.That movie was not Breaker Morant was it if so that was about an Aussie who was shot by the British for despencing his own justice to the Boers Rule 303.

Cheers Rob :P

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  • 2 weeks later...

Aussie who was shot by the British for despencing his own justice to the Boers Rule 303.

I love that movie. "What rule did we shoot them under? Well we didn't carry rule books now did we. We were out on the velt (?) fighting the Boer the way he fought us! We caught them and we shot them under rule .303!"

Chris,

Great photos, keep them coming if you have more.

Dan Murphy

Edited by Daniel Murphy
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"What rule did we shoot them under? Well we didn't carry rule books now did we. We were out on the veldt fighting the Boer the way he fought us! We caught them and we shot them under rule .303!"

Dan Murphy

Dan

I agree that "Breaker Morant" is a great movie. The Aussies defence lawyer tells the court that "Before I came here I was poisoning wells and rounding up Boer women and children." [to put into "concentration camps").

The point is not that Morant and his men are shooting Boer prisoners but that they are pushed into it and have it winked at by their superiors, who can't come up with another way to win, then hung out to dry when the world objects. They're actually following Kitchener's orders when they shoot the Boers dressed in khaki but the court martial denies this. A "cracking good yarn" but also a fascinating look at the morality of war. One of my favourites!

Peter

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About thirty years ago, amongst the Martini-Henry Mk. IVs that hit the market were a number of Mausers with Boer names carved on the butts, released from the Rawalpindi Arsenal, if memory serves.

Their story was interesting. Apparently the British had two problems:

a. What to do with arms captured in South Africa, and

b. How to arm the Frontier Constabulary with modern arms, without giving them British service rifles.

The solution to both was to send the Mausers to India. If the Mausers were stolen, the ammunition supply was limited, and couldn't be augmented by ammunition stolen from the British and Indian regiments.

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