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Have been looking at some pics of highre officers, Really high officers with boxes of medals and pin back awards...

It seems that if ever they "dress down" the awards they still leave on is the EK1 and maybe its ribbon... inspite of having other, higher awards....

Why do you think this is? or am I imagining it?

All the best

Chris

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How does this factor with the Pour le Merite? Do we see that being worn as the only other glitter with the EK's?

Seems like at least for aviators, that was the coin of the realm.

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Regulations required the wear of the Pour le Merite (unless in underwear!)

Note that at the point the photo of Paul v. Hindenburg was taken he was "only" a Generaloberst. He won his Blue Max as a Generaloberst but 5 months later as a Field Marshal, he was awarded the Oakleaves (23/2/15). *** edit - he was promoted within 2 months of award so it is likely that this is a "pre-award pic *** I would make a small wager that the photo above was taken before the award of his PlM and that is why it was not in wear. I doubt that such a visible senior officer (very traditional in his views per my reading) would have flaunted the regulation. I've seen many "fashion statements" by highly decorated officers who wore only the EKI & PlM but I've not seen photos of any but the most candid (out of or partially out of uniform) shots where a recipient of the PlM did not wear it. Boelke is one case but he was hatless with open collar.

Edited by W McSwiggan

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Have been looking at some pics of highre officers, Really high officers with boxes of medals and pin back awards...

It seems that if ever they "dress down" the awards they still leave on is the EK1 and maybe its ribbon... inspite of having other, higher awards....

Why do you think this is? or am I imagining it?

All the best

Chris

Hi Chris, you know this book ("Das alte Heer" von einem Stabsoffizier): Das Alte Heer - Google Bücher

He wrote also something about the awards (I scaned the pages about Orden & Ehrenzeichen and put a PDF-file here):

Download DasAlteHeerOrden.pdf from Sendspace.com - send big files the easy way

.. you have to click on: Download Link: DasAlteHeerOrden.pdf

Have fun and best regards, cheers.gif

Jens

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Chris,

My feeling is that the Iron Cross — indeed it's very shape is nothing less than iconic in German history — much the same as the Maple Leaf is iconic in Canadian history, the white cross in Switzerland, the Stars and Stripes in the USA and other examples.

Look at how many surviving photographs of ordinary soldiers showing them proudly wearing their EK there are — this was a big deal to them at the time and they wanted it recorded for their family history, often with their wife and or family by their side.

The Iron Cross shape is still used as a military marking in the German armed forces to this day.

The wars of liberation against Napoleon is hugh in German history and the Iron Cross was introduced during this time.

During the first war German patriotic jewelry for the most part was in the shape of the Iron Cross (literally hundreds of different designs exist) while so called "sweethearts" in Britain and Canada were in the shape of individual regimental badges, although there were exceptions in both cases of course.

I have observed non-collectors over many years who are able to easily identify the Iron Cross but are hard pressed to even come close to being able to ID a Victoria Cross, Military Cross or DFC. I think, in part, this is because of the EKs classic if simplistic and clean design and colouring.

Also, in Canada for instance, there are different national symbols which have been used over the last 200 years and which have been depicted differently; the Beaver for instance, differing designs and colours for the Maple Leaf, the national flag. But in Germany the Iron Cross shape has remained constant as a national symbol, even though it's shape has been depicted sometimes in an altered form.

Cheers,

Gary

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Hi,

It seems that if they have a PLM it is worn... but often all is laid off other than the PLM and 2 EKs...

Early shot of L here, but at the time he had way more than just the two...

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Don't forget that the history of the EK can really be traced back, iconographically, to the Ritterorden of the 12th century, which of course formed the Wappen of Ostpreussen, so it doesn't get more ingrained than that.

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