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Amazing Nassau Inf Rgt 88 group


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I have a chance to get 3 jackets all from the same guy. they're in outstanding condition!!!!

The only problem is I don't collect uniforms :speechless:

I can get 2 of these types, one has print on the inside the other is a black silk like material.

Edited by Eric K.
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Also included are ALL his posts from the war!!! most are from France he was also a POW in Russia theres TONS of documents, letters etc..... he also has an EK1 and 2 with docs. but the family wants to keep these for some reason, they will part with all the photos but wants to keep the medals??????

Thanks for looking

Eric

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TERRIFIC One Year Volunteer Unteroffizier blue tunic-- the other is the same, or with a button on each side of the collar?

Leutnant der Reserve M1910 Field Gray.

And a WHOLE life's documentayion!!!!! :jumping::love::jumping::love::jumping:

Marvelous good fortune to find such a group miraculously still all together. Imagine it as 954 lots on eCrap.

:cheers:

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Rick

You wouldn't believe the documentation!!! I mean every little thing you can imagine..shooting records, ALOT of feldpost, and pages of that beautiful script that gives me a headache, His little leather wallet with family photo's and notes he carried during the war. plus pictures of his unit with some pretty hefty medalbars!!!!!! I'll be picking it up this weekend.

Oh yeah his feldposts say "Leutnant company commander" does this make sense????

Eric

Edited by Eric K.
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The Feldposts are great lots of info on them

21 FEB 1915 (eastern Front) for 3 days now we get a well earned silence from the the front, I hope all is well at home

May 1915, this feldpost is on a piece of bark from a birch tree... I guess paper was in short supply!!!!!

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Birch bark postcards were a popular item, but amazing to have them SURVIVE this long.

Can you imagine OUR postal systems processing a hunka tree bark? :speechless1::cheeky:

I have a pre-WW1 "postcard" from my old college (no, not from when I was there :shame: ) that was stamped on a piece of leather as soft as a slice of bologna. No way THAT would have made it through automated machinery, but hand-processing actually worked, once upon a time! :rolleyes:

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May I suggest to get copies of the EK documents made so you can keep them with the other items.

Very nice feldgrau Waffenrock. It appears that this issue piece had the collar altered to make it a bit more impressive. This was commonly done, as it was cheaper than getting a whole custom tunic made, but still gave the impression of a tailored piece. I have an issue Bavarian Waffenrock with the same type of period collar "improvement".

Chip

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A Huuuuuuuuuuge thanks to Erik who not only saved this group.... but also passed it on to me.

It is great to see community work in action.

Was a pleasure to have Erik around for a couple of beers tonight, talking BS and drinking a couple of beers.

Herr Webers stuff are in my grubby and appreciative paws.

I had given up all hope of getting a mint, Kammerstempled M10 jacket. I now need some wartime boards for a Lt in RIR258 :-)

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RIR 258 was not a Good Place for Leutnants der Reserve named Weber:

From Major d. L. Friedrich Uebe's luckily timed 1939 "Ehrenmal des preu?ischen Offizier-Korps" published in Berlin by E. S. Mittler & Sohn.

More familiarly (and briefer) known as "Dead Prussians."

:cheers: Glenn !

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I would imagine this is one of the rarest possible jackets to find in this condition. From the first pic I thought it was a thinner private purchase jacket. From the second pic I saw it was issue stamped. My then thoughts were, ?Great! An issue piece!? but I thought the shoulder boards had been cut out and was prepared for a well worn field jacket.

It knocked me off my feet to see the superb, astounding condition of the jacket. Hardly ever to be found in that condition as by the time they stopped making these there were still a few years of war to go through.

Added to that, the shoulder boards were not cut out, it is set up for slip on boards. I assume these would be Lt boards with a white underlay, not yet subdued but still bright metal wire?

Added little bonus was a worn buttonhole ek ribbon in the pocket.

To display this I am going to try set it up as he would have worn it in August 1915? ie, correct shoulder boards (but without numbers as I don?t want to ?create? a set) and either a peeked cap or picklehaube.

His death notice only mentions an EK2 so maybe the news of his EK1 had not yet reached the family. There is a very bitter letter he wrote to the family about 2-3 months before his death, basically disowning them and saying he was breaking off all contact with them so maybe that is why they never knew.

Anyway, my task now is to recreate his service life. He was killed almost exactly to the day of the 1 year anniversary of the outbreak of the war.

I assume the only reason that such an early jacket was not worn out was because it was safe at home.

I am ecstatic to have the chance to own and research this.

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Chris

Looks like your getting some good info already!!!! hmmmm I wonder what the story is with the TR medals if he bought the farm in WW1? family maybe?

I'm glad it's in a good home for years to come and keep us informed..oh yeah thank for the beers!!!

Eric

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