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I don't comment on items being sold by unknown 3rd parties since putting money in the pockets of sellers who are too lazy to do their own research is SUICIDAL among us as fellow collectors.

Please do not ask for identifications of items while they are being sold.

And please do not identify items while they are being sold.

AFTER such items are sold-- IF someone here HAS successfully bid on an item, we are thrilled to help.

I've never had a lazy seller yet share his profits with me for information volunteered or an unknown offsite buyer come along and thank me for posting added data.

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I'm not a seller and only infrequently try to buy something of special interest. In my naivety, it never even occurred to me that my simple request for help from the vast amount of expertise participating in this Forum could be misused by "unknown 3rd parties since putting money in the pockets of sellers who are too lazy to do their own research is SUICIDAL among us as fellow collectors". I will be more careful in future and curb my impatience for knowledge until such time the article in question has been sold.

I'm glad Christophe, that the picture has found a good home, and sincerely hope that with our combined knowledge we can put a name to the face. He certainly bears a strong resemblance to Erich W?llwarth.

Best regards,

VJK

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  • 2 weeks later...

Seems I missed this thread. Yes, this is char. General der Infanterie Erich W?llwarth (1872-1951). He is wearing only his wartime awards, so the WF3a (a peacetime award WITHOUT swords!) is left out, as well as his BO3 and RAO4.

The Reichswehr 1924 ranklist shows only a BMV3X, but the award lists confirm: BVM3XmKr on 11.6.1917 as KW Oberstlt and Chief of General Staff.

1929 aD as char General d Inf, BUT reactivated in 1939.

1940 Gen d Inf zV, Kommandierender General Stellv. GK IV. AK and Befehlshaber WK IV

1942 aD

And even got the DKiS on 12.6.1943 - at 71!

I also found out he survived the Bombing of Dresden and fled to his native W?rttemberg, saving only what he could carry. He then had to live on social welfare (72 DM monthly), from 1949 on he got a tiny pension of 160 DM. He was running low on wood, coal and potatoes during the winter.

And he was an anti-Nazi, strictly opposed to radical ideas propagated by people like Remer after the war.

A wonderful photo, Christophe!

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  • 4 months later...

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