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One other area on para collecting that is not purely military are collecting the sport parachute badges of the Flug und Fallschirmsportverband der DDR (FFSV) which in English would be something like the Federation for Aerial and Parachute Sports. These sports parachute badges are often mistakenly described as freefall parachute badges. Below is my collection of these badges which is close to completion.

The badges in the top row were issued from 1982-1990 with the exception of the bronze level badge with white between the parachute lines, this was only issued 1980-81. The badges in the second row were issued 1957-1979. The bottom row are earlier versions of that badge without provision for numbered hangers. I've never actually seen hangers for these badges so my assumption are that they are quite rare.

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One other area on para collecting that is not purely military are collecting the sport parachute badges of the Flug und Fallschirmsportverband der DDR (FFSV) which in English would be something like the Federation for Aerial and Parachute Sports. These sports parachute badges are often mistakenly described as freefall parachute badges. Below is my collection of these badges which is close to completion.

The badges in the top row were issued from 1982-1990 with the exception of the bronze level badge with white between the parachute lines, this was only issued 1980-81. The badges in the second row were issued 1957-1979. The bottom row are earlier versions of that badge without provision for numbered hangers. I've never actually seen hangers for these badges so my assumption are that they are quite rare.

Kevin,

Thanks for sharing these!! I never even knew of this organization.

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  • 2 months later...

Very nice. What year was it made (year code) and is it wool or gabardine?

Hi Kevin,

it is gabardine and had an "M" date code for 1970. It was a used/worn tunic when I bought it and It had 4 holes above the right pocket so I guessed on the Para badges and Lv II Qual-spange. I also added the sholder boards and other awards. The sleeve patches and collor tress were already in place.

John

Edited by John F.
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These are a few of the Fallschirmj?ger Field items I have....

DSC01026.jpg

DSC01027.jpg

Assault Vest.

DSC01025.jpg

Jump Pullover.

DSC01018.jpg

Plastic Jump helmet.

DSC01013.jpg

DSC01014.jpg

Backpack.

DSC01022.jpg

DSC01023.jpg

DSC01024.jpg

Jump Bag for a MPi KM with DDR produced Goggles.

Enjoy.

Edited by Viktor
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Viktor - Outstanding para equipment! After years of looking this year I've finally found a reasonably priced para rucksack. I also picked up two of the three versions of the plastic para helmet. I still have to find the earliest.

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  • 1 month later...

That is some truely awesome militaria!! Thank you all for sharing. I am just packing up my stuff for a long storage due to my transfer next week. I came across these Early DDR Air Borne Litzen.

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Paul, Look at post #26 in this thread, this is a sport parachute badge of the Flug und Fallschirmsportverband der DDR (FFSV).

Crap! sorry about that! :rolleyes:

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks Gordon,

Was the orange beret only for parade?

Paul

Here are two officer paratrooper berets; field grey and orange. If the orange was just for parades, was the field grey for everyday wear? Why not wear the orange every day? Is this a common segregation among paratroopers of all nations?

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Here are two officer paratrooper berets; field grey and orange. If the orange was just for parades, was the field grey for everyday wear? Why not wear the orange every day? Is this a common segregation among paratroopers of all nations?

Grey was for wear with the field uniform and Orange with the dress uniform. I can't speak for other countries, but US Airborne forces only wear one color beret, Maroon.

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Claudius, my assumption is that grey was used for everyday/field use because it is easier to camoflage than bright orange! It would stink to be in the field, trying to conceal myself wearing a bright orange hat.

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Claudius, my assumption is that grey was used for everyday/field use because it is easier to camoflage than bright orange! It would stink to be in the field, trying to conceal myself wearing a bright orange hat.

Ahh...so really the orange used in parades is really a bit of vanity. The paratroopers need to be noticed and admired!

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Ahh...so really the orange used in parades is really a bit of vanity. The paratroopers need to be noticed and admired!

LOL! Exactly! There were(if I remember correctly) just over 600 of these guys at any particular time. I am sure that they had a sense of pride belonging to such a selective group of men!

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Claudius,

I don't know of any other nation than the DDR that had two different coloured berets. Dark maroon was sort of the standard set for para headgear by the Brits during the war and western nations still prefer that colour and wear it in the field as well as on parade.

Regards,

Gordon

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Claudius,

I don't know of any other nation than the DDR that had two different coloured berets. Dark maroon was sort of the standard set for para headgear by the Brits during the war and western nations still prefer that colour and wear it in the field as well as on parade.

Regards,

Gordon

The ( CSSR) CSLA's Paratroopers had a reversable Beret, Raindrop Vzor 65 Field and a Maroon Service Dress side, when the Vzor 85 Uniform was adopted the Field side is a Plain Green, inline with the "new" Combat dress colour.

I don't know what is the Norm now with their Green Woodland Pattern.

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With regard to the colour of the DDR's Airborne beret; it simply matched the designated branch colour for Airborne troops. The rank insignia, uniform piping and beret were all done in this particular orange colour (except in the field, of course). This colour was the traditional colour of Airborne Troops since the Third Reich (the Luftwaffe Airborne used more or less the same colour). I doubt seriously that vanity was involved here.

Also, the beret's use was becoming more widespread for all branches toward the end of the DDR. The last proposed uniform change for the DDR placed everyone in a beret. So, all those pretty branch colours would have been "on parade" once the change was completed (which it wasn't) and everyone would have had a second, field-use beret.

It seems the DDR's idea latched on here in the states- everyone in the Army is now wearing a beret (albeit most are black). Certainly cheaper to produce and less cumbersome than the billed service cap, I still prefer the days when only one beret was seen- that colour was green and it meant something back then.

Edited by Greg Collins
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With regard to the colour of the DDR's Airborne beret; it simply matched the designated branch colour for Airborne troops. The rank insignia, uniform piping and beret were all done in this particular orange colour (except in the field, of course). This colour was the traditional colour of Airborne Troops since the Third Reich (the Luftwaffe Airborne used more or less the same colour). I doubt seriously that vanity was involved here.

Also, the beret's use was becoming more widespread for all branches toward the end of the DDR. The last proposed uniform change for the DDR placed everyone in a beret. So, all those pretty branch colours would have been "on parade" once the change was completed (which it wasn't) and everyone would have had a second, field-use beret.

It seems the DDR's idea latched on here in the states- everyone in the Army is now wearing a beret (albeit most are black). Certainly cheaper to produce and less cumbersome than the billed service cap, I still prefer the days when only one beret was seen- that colour was green and it meant something back then.

I'm not doubting or questioning the use of the "beret". I understand paratroopers or other branches of the military using a beret for regulation headgear. I just didn't fully "get it" why there was the orange beret for parades and then a dr. grey for field wear.

Why not wear the dr. grey in the parades? Or why not wear the orange in the field? If the "field" is the home barracks, no problem. If the "field" is combat or near combat areas I can see why you don't want to be glowing like a firefly for snipers. But then the dr. grey would be their beret color and they would use them for parades as well.

Is it that the orange beret is for wear with the dress uniform and the dr. grey for the field fatigues? If so, then it is notable that no other country does this distintion. Are there any photos of EG paratroopers, both in uniform and in field gear?

Also, don't misunderstand my use of "vanity". "Vanity" might suggest an over self-indulgence on appearance.

Paratroopers are hand-picked troops that have unique training. Distinguishing markings and coloration would be due to an elite group to set them off from other troops. It represents a notable and deserved pride.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Gents,

I'm new here and would like to add some pics in regards, to the above topic as i've been serving in the FJB/LstR-40 from 1986 to 1989.

I've made a subscription but can not upload any pics as it shows me thefollowing message:

The server returned an error during upload no_upload_dir_perms

Does anyone have any idea what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks,

JD

Edited by gismo2004
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Hi,

Your problem with up loading photos is due to the restrictions the GMIC places on probationary members. Here is an excerpt from the GMIC rules that covers this area.

4. Probationary Members Accounts:

On joining the forum members will be given a restricted users account. This account gives members the ability to post messages and upload small photographs, but has other restrictions placed on it. This account will automatically be upgraded to a ?Full Membership? account when the new member has shown commitment to the club and is deemed by the management to be suitable for full membership.

Note that probabtionary members have the right to upload "small photographs". Unfortunately, the club rules don't specify what constitutes a "small photograph" so that you would know what you are restricted to. I went looking on the forum to find what size you would be able to load but I was unsuccessful in finding anything. It is probably listed somewhere but not in any place that I looked. I beleive I have heard someone say that 70k was the largest photo a probationary member could post. I would very much like to see your photos so please try and reduce them to a size that will be accepted.

Regards,

Gordon

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