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China Incident Commemorative Medal


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Excellent info. As usual, Nick Komiya comes through with fantastic stuff. He really should write a book. Thanks Nick K, and thanks Nick from Russia for this insight. Still a bit strange that no cas

Dear Mr. Ulsterman, It appears I owe you an apology. You have a memory that is working. Forgive me for suggesting it never happened. I do that quite a bit these days much to the consternation of m

I have a copy of his handwritten notes on the Chinese Medal Book he was planning to publish plus his article on 'some ambiguos Chinese Medals" If desired I could post them. Richard

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Well, these aren't exactly common. I mean common, if they were you would see more on the market. I wouldn't call it RARE, but is it definitely uncommon in my book. Frank, your purchasing experience is similar to one of my Korean Census medals - that I blight for exactly the same price you paid for your China Incident Commemorative. "Buy It Now" on eBay and I just happened to be in the right place at exactly the right time, seller had no idea what he had and I spotted the listing just a few minutes after it went up! :)

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Rarity is often a matter of perspective. For those of us actively involved, the China Incident Commem. Medal can certainly be called Very Scarce, or maybe Rare. To others in the hobby who have never seen one, it's very rare. In the main sector of the numismatic hobby, i.e. coins, in the last century or longer there have been many attempts to establish a rarity scale that would be universally applied...sort of a rarity language that everyone understands. Some tables used a R1 to R5, others R1 to 10, with the lowest numbers for the most common items. I prefer the ten point scale and as we learn more about the actual numbers of items out there, I hope such a rarity table will come to be used by all of us in the ODM hobby.

Great buy on the Korean Census Dieter...when at shows, it always pays to turn them over when we see one...could be the Korean variety!

Thanks to Mr. JapanX for the photo posting tips. I'll try it now. BTW, Mr. X, I love that Pawlonia Star in your icon. It would look great with my similar badge, especially if I had a sash and case! Should you ever tire of looking at it.... Perhaps someone has an extra sash at least?

Anyone near the Dallas area should attend the OMSA convention. The public day is Saturday, August 18th. Check for further details at OMSA.org Has anyone seen any advertising for the convention by OMSA here at GMIC?

Best to All, Frank Draskovic

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Rarity is often a matter of perspective.

Everything is a matter of perspective ;)

BTW, Mr. X, I love that Pawlonia Star in your icon. It would look great with my similar badge, especially if I had a sash and case! Should you ever tire of looking at it.... Perhaps someone has an extra sash at least?

That's a good one Frank!

Nice piece by the way :)

Regards,

Dr. X

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