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Japanese Orders in Tamatebako Miyake (Boxes for Nobles and Foreigners)

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thanks to our colleague Pieter we have a nice close ups of another 3rd class box ;)

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Now 4th class box.

What we have here is an exellent example of 4th class sacred treasure that was awarded to Generalleutnant Georg Heer in 1899. Between 1897 and 1899 he was an instructor (back in these days he was only Major) in artillery school in Jüterborg - many young japanese officers took his courses ;)

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And another 1st class.

This one was awarded to His Excellency Sir Reginald Edward Stubbs, Governor of Hong Kong, 1919-1925 on 24 November 1921.

Stubbs was born 13 October 1876, son of the Bishop of Chester and later of Oxford. Educated at Radley and Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Entered the Colonial Offce in 1900. Sent on a Special Mission to the Malay Peninsula and Hong Kong in 1912. Colonial Secretary of Ceylon, 1913-1919. CMG 1914. KCMG 1919. Governor of Hong Kong 1919-1925. Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief Jamaica 1926-1932. GCMG 1928. Governor and Commander-in Chief Ceylon 1932-1933. Governor and Commander-in Chief Cyprus 1933-1937. Retired in 1937 after the Bracegirdle Incident. Died 7th December 1947.

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Now 2nd class.

There are two versions of boxes for 2nd class rising suns.

Why?

Because there were two versions of 2nd class rising sun order between 1875 and 1920s.

Peterson was absolutely right when he wrote that The Second Class of the Rising Sun originally consisted of the same breast star alone, worn on the right breast. Imperial Edict No. 76 of November 17, 1888, provided that an accessory insignia would be worn on the neck, and Imperial Board of Decorations Directive No.1 of November 19, 1888, specified that this accessory badge is identical to the Third Class badge of the Order. ("Orders and Medals of Japan and Associated States", 3rd edition, p. 24)

Unfortunately not all our colleagues were able to read Peterson opus thoroughly. Otherwise why some of them made such false, sweeping statement like this one: "The Rising Sun breast star does not have its own case since it is always part of a 1st or 2nd class set. Hence, it will be in the relevant case, these are rectangular". I must say this is very poor scholarship. We'll let this statement lies heavy on their phaleristik conscience ;)

That`s how early 2nd class case looks like (thanks for the pictures Pieter!!!)

Edited by JapanX

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Now later (after 1888) 2nd class box (many thanks for the photos David!!!)

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  • Blog Comments

    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
    • I know the way I got into collecting is like so many other people; through a sibling. I also know that my love of history is barely unique in a place like this. So I know I have a shared background with many people. A less shared area - perhaps - is that I've always loved the thrill of the chase. When I decide I want, say, a 1914 trio with an original bar, to a cavalry unit, the utter thrill of getting out there and, (a) finding groups that fit the criteria and, (b) comparing them re: ranks, uni
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