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Brian Wolfe

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Everything posted by Brian Wolfe

  1. I have been told, by Ed Haynes a number of years ago, that once a soldier is awarded a medal he (or she) is expected that medal or the ribbon without the medal to appear on the medal bar by the time of the next parade. Apparently it takes time for the medal to arrive in the soldier's hands. I have several with what looks like medals missing when in fact is is a matter of just the ribbon there representing the medal itself. I suspect that the tailor's copies fill that regulation's need, providing the service person has the funds, which lower ranks probably lack. Regards Brian
  2. I would agree with 922F, this is probably a tailor's copy. The one I have is struck from silver, named and the detail is much more "crisp" especially the word "Territorial" on the medal's bar. Still a tailor's copy is not worthless in a collection at least until an original comes along. Regards Brian
  3. Hello Alan329, Welcome to the GMIC and a great collection as well by the way. Well done. Regards Brian
  4. Hi GrantRCanada, Thank you form your comment and the correction, it is appreciated. When I saw this post I had forgotten about making the original entry way back in 2012. Regards Brian
  5. Well done Dave, a very nice looking display. I'm in the process of trimming down my collection as well; I have pretty well run out of space. Thanks for sharing your pictures of your new den. Regards Brian
  6. Hello RGJDEE, Great photo of your grandfather and the stacked (proper term?) SMLEs. You've progressed to swords and especially cavalry sabres? I'd say you are going in the correct direction! 😉 Thanks for the comment. Regards Brian
  7. You certainly posted a sword that had me looking through my reference books. The "R" looks like an attempt to copy the first letter of the famous sword supplier, Runkel" of Solingen. Runkel wrote Solingen with a spiral start to the "S" which looks to have been attempted on your sword. The more I looked at my references the more I must agree with Peter. Possibly this was an attempt to "cash in" on the great need for swords during the Napoleonic War. During the Napoleonic campaigns Infantry Officers often equipped themselves with the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Sabre rather than the light w
  8. Hello bolewts58 and mconrad, Thank you very much for your comments. Not being a real writer (I'm more of a conversationalist) I must think that, like a sports game from the day before, if there are no comments or disagreements about the game then it surely must have been a dud. Some people liked the acting and others the writing, so all in all it was a great series. We own all seven seasons and when season eight is out for sale we intend to binge watch it until our eyes bleed. That's my plan, I doubt my wife would agree, she being the brains of the household. Thanks again it is
  9. OK, I've had time to do some reading and I can see how the history of the War of the Roses could very well have had a bearing on the writing for The Game of Thrones. However, I would like to hear the opinions of others. Regards Brian
  10. The Game of Thrones The Game of Thrones or How I Wasted 8 Years worth of Sunday evenings – and Enjoyed Every Minute. The television series “The Game of Thrones” (GOT) is ”all the buzz” at the moment, on the Internet and around office water coolers everywhere. I know as I constantly have to chase the staff back to their duties here at the Home Office. Just because I don’t pay them and they are not allowed outside...ever, should not give them the right to waste time. Ingrates! They should have read the small print. If you have not heard about the series, “The
  11. There is an interesting myth surrounding the design of the “dumb-bell” cross section blade. This is a myth that has been around from the very issuance of this pattern and has been held as fact by many sword collectors in the past. Unlike the scandal over inferior British blades, both sword and bayonet, of the mid 1800s this was not, to my knowledge, exaggerated by the media or politicians of the day to further their personal agendas. Rather than stumbling through a paraphrasing of the work of another I will quote the passage from John Wilkinson Latham’s book, British Military Swords, From 1800
  12. Hi aussiesoldier, Thanks for the submission it was most interesting. I was hoping others would join in on what I think a most interesting subject, thanks again. My example is marked to the 1st (Canadian) Hussars.Sorry for the poor quality photo. Regards Brian
  13. Thank you very much, that was greatly appreciated. Regards Brian
  14. Hello eurorders. Thanks for your comments and what beautiful reproductions. You are a very talented fellow indeed. I tend to stay in the area of less attractive archaeological specimen copies, such as the two mummies shown below. These are copies from photos of British museum specimens and represent the mummified remains of cats and hawks used as temple offerings in ancient Egypt. The wraps are on carved wooden bases and the wrapping style is as close as possible to the originals. I attempted to make the cat look as if the pitch and natron used on originals had seeped through the bandage
  15. Hello eurorders, Thank you for your comment. I would have to agree with you completely. I like to reproduce different museum items for my own amusement and a friend of mine often assists me. We were talking about what we do and both agree that we, for the most part, lack the talent to develop, weapons for example, that are unique or fantasy items. We are pretty handy at reproducing what we see but the idea of developing items completely of our own design is beyond our skill base. I think the same thing holds true with fiction writing as compared with non-fiction. Personally, I simply lack
  16. Congratulations on the new addition. This hobby is never dull, always something to challenge the collector's knowledge. Regards Brian
  17. Congratulation on an excellent addition to your collection, well done. Regards Brian
  18. Guarantees in Life – Guaranteed “If you purchase our product we guarantee it will improve your life and you’ll be a happier person”. “Use this product and we guarantee you will be 150% more likely to stop smoking.” First off there are no guarantees in life; based on the theory of probability some external force with assert itself which changes the basis of the initial guarantee’s claim. Secondly, in the second example, 100% is the maximum of any given quantity. One could argue that government could, and at times will, spend 150% of a budget. However this is far from accurate as “th
  19. Hi Nightbreak, So your the fellow who reads my blogs. Good to hear from a fellow over taxed and under-appreciated, Canadian. Happy fiirst day of spring.😎 Regards Brian
  20. Hi Mark, I must have been experiencing a senior's moment when I wrote "William" as when I review the photos now it looks clearly like a "G" for George.Looks like I was not the only one to have missed that, except for you,. well done. I have written several articles for publications in Australia and New Zealand and some have been on early British police. Suddenly people started to call me the "British Police Guy" which I am not. Perhaps I should forward this post to those I correspond with as proof that I am not an expert on matters police. British or otherwise. 🙄 I will say this with
  21. Hi Mark, I would say that you have a 100% original piece. The truncheon is in excellent condition yet the paint is showing its age, which is exactly would one would expect. I have a feeling this was used more like a tipstaff in the sense that it showed the officer's authority rather than something that was used to get a criminals "attention". Possibly a rural constable. I would put this one in my collection in the blink of an eye, had I the opportunity. Well done on an excellent William IV specimen. Regards Brian
  22. More great finds, thanks for sharing them; you have made me rethink and consider this area of collection Regards Brian
  23. Space: The Final Frontier or the Confessions of a Addict It starts out quite harmlessly, perhaps at the insistence of a friend, peer pressure as it has become to be known. It seemed harmless enough; after all it was just a “one off”, and not something you were intending to become a habit. Not like those others, all consumed by the drive for more. You know them, with their excuses of being able to stop at anytime, no one is getting hurt and staying well within their financial parameters. After a while you started to look for more sources, buying wherever and whenever y
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