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Brian Wolfe

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Everything posted by Brian Wolfe

  1. Oh, well no matter we are all "well aged" here on the GMIC, good vintages each and every one. Regards Brian
  2. Hi Peter, I do hope you meant to write your "aged brain" and not "aged brian". πŸ˜„ Regards An aged Brian.πŸ˜‰
  3. I find it interesting how "regulations" were not always adhered to in use. At lot had to do with the personal preferences of the individual officers. Basically the introduction of the 1854 hilt (no folding section) did not mean that all officers either purchased a new sword or had the old one fitted with the new regulation hilt. I think the Gothic style is the British Infantry sword most often encountered. With the number of different rank insignia, branch of service and Monarch's ciphers found on these sword's hilts it can become a whole collecting theme onto itself. I have found infantry hil
  4. If it were mine I would spend the time and money (?) to restore this interesting sword. Another possibility might be that this was ordered "shorter" to be used as a levy or "walking out sword". Levies were official events such as balls and Royal functions. A walking out sword would be a sword use worn when not of duty and yet still in uniform and out in public. Either way I would certainly restore this sword. Just be sure not to use a steel wire wheel. better left "under-cleaned" than ruin it by removing more metal or leaving scratches in the surface. On the topic of Sergeant's swords, th
  5. I doubt this as, taking some measurement from my examples, if this had been ground down the distance from the fuller to the tip would be about 2 inches. The example shown here has a proportionate distance from the end of the fuller to the tip which would indicate that the blade is as manufactured. IMHO, of course. Regards Brian
  6. It is not a sergeant's sword as they were without engraving on the blade what-so-ever. There is a possibility for the short length and that is in the practice of rank purchase during this time period. A young man with "means" could purchase a entry level officer's rank and at times this could well result in the fine young officer and gentleman being of a shorter than average height compared with other officers. While it would appear that "regulations" were hard and fast rules when you read Robson and other experts work they are giving the reader what the regulations said but not necessarily wh
  7. Well from what I've seen being gay and happily married (same sex) is about as difficult as being straight and happily married. So, either way, good luck with whatever your choice. Regards Brian
  8. Peter, your opinion is worth at least a gold tuppence; right on target. This is a fantasy term created by not only dealers but family members of the soldier well after he, or she, had gone to Valhalla. It's right up there with Ninja swords and unicorn horns. Of course that discounts that the original owner simply had a hate on for everyone regardless of national affiliation. They are interesting in that it shows what one soldier thought important and relevant and took the time to collect them. Ah, collectors "Bless 'em all, the long the short and the tall". Regards Brian
  9. Hi ccj, Thanks for your comments. Funny how, for me at least, coffee has become a habit more than a conscience choice. It's the old, "Well if you having one (coffee) pour me as well". When I get together with my son-in-law, a former Brit, it's tea all the way. Thanks again. Regards Brian
  10. Since I posted this I have made some changes that works better for me. The original stands hold the sword and scabbard vertically and it was difficult to photograph. I made new stands that hold both the swords and scabbards at an angle to make taking the photos a lot easier. I used wooden blocks to hold the supports as once cropped they didn't show anyway so even though I like the first ones as being all Plexiglas these new ones work so much better. The photos show the stands, the stands with the sword and scabbard ready to photograph and the sword and scabbard once they have been croppe
  11. Thanks for your reply Patrick, just in case some might not know what the Belgian WW1 Medal you were referencing looks like I have included one here. I understand that the small crown on the ribbon denoted the recipient was a volunteer.
  12. Many thanks JustinG, I have modified these a bit since this post and should add those pictures. Regards Brian
  13. Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian
  14. Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian
  15. The British and Their Tea. History is not just about the dates of battles, there is the consideration of planning, tactics, and supply, as well as establishing objectives and the logistics in general to be considered. All of these factors and more could never take place or even be considered by the British Military of the Victorian era without the key ingredient; tea. Some background: Before we get out the Brown Betty let’s consider tea and the way different counties enjoy this beverage. I understand the British like their tea with milk and in some areas of the UK with the ad
  16. Interesting how that statement and your avatar picture complement one another. πŸ˜‰ Regards Brian
  17. I have just compared yours with the only one I have in my collection and I believe yours to be authentic. Well done. Regards Brian
  18. Interesting. It seems ages since I took out my collection of Indian Police Service Medals and looked them over. I'm sure adding the COVID19 service medal to my collection will not be something that I'll see anytime soon, perhaps not even within my collecting lifetime. Thanks for this new information and the excuse for me to go over my medals collection once again. Regards Brian
  19. Is there a discount if someone wanted all 5 items?
  20. Very nice sword and the history that comes with it makes it a one of a kind. He may have had the final guard installed as the Pattern 1897 guard had the inner edge turned down to protect the uniform from wear commonly caused by the guard of the Pattern 1895. I would assume that he anticipated that he would only be using the sword for ceremonial purposes during his retirement. Not that it couldn't have had the guard changed as a gift, that is totally possible. It also, of course depicts the cipher of the reining monarch of that time. The leather scabbard is the field issue and I would bet there
  21. Peter, I have been following this thread and was also looking in my WWI material for photos of these "masks" to no avail. On the other hand if I had been a betting man I would have made a small (very small) wager that these were fairly modern remakes or even fantasy items. After reading Bayern's reply I'm happy I didn't waste my money, once again proving, "Wagering bad, collecting good" is the best motto.I also wish this was the first time I was wrong. A few years ago I passed by a really nice supposed British sword at a show thinking there was never such a thing only to find out recently that
  22. No problems Spasm, Colin's work is indeed awe inspiring. Regards Brian
  23. Thanks for the kind comments Brett and Peter. An additional tip of the hat to Peter for setting the record straight regarding the Asian flu. I like my writing to be as accurate as possible and anything medical is a long way from my comfort zone. Regards Brian
  24. Many thanks for your comments and wishes for Spring's arrival. I don't know where spring is hiding as it is snowing here at the moment. Like winter, we will be happy when this virus becomes a part of history. Stay safe. Regards Brian
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