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The picture was taken in Plön and he is wearing:

RAO4; KO3; Dienstauszeichnung; 1870/71 medal ? ; one of the 1866 crosses? 

so I concluded it has to be Oberstleutnant Billig, cause the decorations would fit; he might got the OV3 WF3a after the picture was taken.

could this be a possibility or could I be wrong?

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(entry from the 1914 ranklist)

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image.thumb.png.e1618815cb7c1366402e7ed8d3013190.png

Edited by Utgardloki
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Oberst Boeckh (18.11.37-4.11.1908) spent much of his career with the corps of cadets from early 1866 onwards. Although he returned to his regiment, the Kaiser Franz Garde-Grenadier-Regiment for the campaign in Bohemia in 1866 (fighting at Alt-Rognitz and Königgrätz), he remained at the cadet school in Wahlstatt during the Franco-German war. He served at Plön for numerous years, starting in 1873, becoming the commander there on 22 January 1880 as a Major. He left some ten years later as a charakterisierter Oberst on 18 October 1890 to become the director of the military orphanage in Potsdam. Retiring on 27 September 1893, he died in Berlin in 1908.

Regards

Glenn

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Thanks a lot,

I am buying more photographs lately, but my knowledge about 19th to early 20th- century photography is quite limited.

I would be thankful for any suggestions on good books about the topic.

Edited by Utgardloki
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Helo!

 

19 hours ago, Glenn J said:

Oberst Boeckh (18.11.37-4.11.1908) spent much of his career with the corps of cadets from early 1866 onwards. Although he returned to his regiment, the Kaiser Franz Garde-Grenadier-Regiment for the campaign in Bohemia in 1866 (fighting at Alt-Rognitz and Königgrätz), he remained at the cadet school in Wahlstatt during the Franco-German war. He served at Plön for numerous years, starting in 1873, becoming the commander there on 22 January 1880 as a Major. He left some ten years later as a charakterisierter Oberst on 18 October 1890 to become the director of the military orphanage in Potsdam. Retiring on 27 September 1893, he died in Berlin in 1908.

Regards

Glenn

Hi Glenn!

I can add, he promoted to Oberstleutnant April 5, 1884

Edited by The Prussian
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  • 1 year later...
On 05/01/2021 at 09:00, Glenn J said:

(...) he remained at the cadet school in Wahlstatt during the Franco-German war.

Which, for those who didn't hear this before, made him a recipient of the 1870/71 medal in steel on the combatant ribbon, while officials, civil doctors/medics and members of the "Freiwillige Krankenpflege" that were close to the frontline in France, would receive same medal on the non-combatant ribbon...

 

:wacky:

 

According to my sources, a total of 341,949 such medals was awarded to soldiers that stayed "at home", while the other group to receive steel medals, officials and civil medics, were no more than 57,094 persons, including an unknown number of females.

 

See Gerd Scharfenberg and Klaus-Peter Merta: Die „Medaille zur Erinnerung an des Hochseligen Kaisers und Königs Wilhelm I., des Großen, Majestät“ – Zum 100jährigen Stiftungsjubiläum der „Kaiser-Wilhelm-Erinnerungsmedaille“ (sog. „Zentenarmedaille“). In: Orden-Militaria-Magazin No. 77, Steinau 1997. p. 1–34.

 

Edited by saschaw
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