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Russian Soldiers Awards to Romanian Soldiers


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Reverse of the Victory Medal :beer:

Hallo Igor, :beer:

thanks for the close up of the rear of the Romanian Inter-Allied Victory Medal. :jumping:

The Romanian award pictured is of an unofficial variety: Type "C" as identified in Mr. Alexander J. Laslo book

"The Inter-Allied Victory Medals of World War 1, Second Revised Edition."

Please see also my post at: http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=9376 with regards these medals.

It is very common to find unofficial Romanian Victory Medals on large bars, and in noway degrads the historic value of the item. :jumping::jumping:

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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Igor....

What a ..... WONDERFULL pictures!!!

but... What is this one about???

IPB Image

Kind regards,

Jacky

p.s

Keep going on with those pictures.....

Award-Certificates are fine...

But pictures of the awardees are best :):D

:beer:

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These men are all holders of the Order of Michael the Brave (the highest Romanian order awarded for bravery). They are wearing the special cape and hat of the order.

According to the text on the photo, they are at a parade on 10 May 1939 (The Kingdom's Day) in the Cotroceni district of Bucharest.

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The holders of the Order of Michael the Brave had many privileges: they attended official ceremonies in a special sector, they received a plot of land from the state, they could travel by railway, plane or boat for free, free education for their children, etc.

The Order could be awarded only to officers. The highest bravery award for lower ranks was the Cross of Military Virtue.

Edited by dragos03
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Igor, here is the translation of the last 2 documents. The first one authorises him to wear the distinctive lanyards which showed that his unut was awarded the Michael the Brave Order and Military Virtue Cross for bravery during WW1.

The second awards him the "2nd Balkan War Victory Medal" for taking part in the victorious campaign against Bulgaria in 1913.

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Igor, here is the translation of the last 2 documents. The first one authorises him to wear the distinctive lanyards which showed that his unut was awarded the Michael the Brave Order and Military Virtue Cross for bravery during WW1.

The second awards him the "2nd Balkan War Victory Medal" for taking part in the victorious campaign against Bulgaria in 1913.

MULTUMESC !!!!

Thank you ! :beer:

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Hummm :blush:

It's a blue fouragere... Just to denote that the unit he commanded or where he served had cited several times for their bravery. Just like the french did.

But from what medal are the colours???? :blush:

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  • 6 months later...

I believe the fourragere was attached to the Order of Michael the Brave. Soldiers of the unit awarded with the order were entitled to wear it as long as they remained with the unit. The blue reflected the color of the order badge's enamel.

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I believe the fourragere was attached to the Order of Michael the Brave. Soldiers of the unit awarded with the order were entitled to wear it as long as they remained with the unit. The blue reflected the color of the order badge's enamel.

No Lukasz, the fourragere for the Order of Michael the Brave was dark red with gold stripes, thus reflecting the colour of the ribbon, not the badge. The only fourragere that reflected more the colours of the badge than those of the ribbon was that for the Order of the Star of Romania: blue with red stripes, while the ribbon was red with silver stripes.

The book by Safta et al on Romanian war decorations mentions only 4 fourrageres, for the following decorations:

- The Order of Michael the Brave: dark red with gold stripes

- Military Virtue Medal: red with blue tripes

- The Order for Aeronautical Virtue: light blue with silver stripes

- The Order of the Star of Romania: blue with red stripes

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Hello Your Majesty,

My fault! Thanks for correcting me. And two questions:

1) do you know if there was a fourrgere to the orders of the Crown of Romania and of the Naval Merit too?

2) most of major Romanian orders (with the exception of the Crown of Romania for obvious reasons) have been restored. Do you know if the fourageres for them have been provided as well?

It seems to be a "fourragere day" at GMIC look here.

Best regards,

Lukasz

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1) do you know if there was a fourrgere to the orders of the Crown of Romania and of the Naval Merit too?

The Naval Merit was only a medal. Anyhow, only the fourrageres of the four orders above are described in the book.

2) most of major Romanian orders (with the exception of the Crown of Romania for obvious reasons) have been restored. Do you know if the fourageres for them have been provided as well?

I do not think so. For example the Guard Regiment has been decorated with the Order of the Star of Romania, but they do not wear any fourrageres.

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  • 4 weeks later...

On some photos Lt. Col. Chiritescu with blue "furajera".

Igor, can you please give some details about the fourragere in your collection? What are its colours, dark blue and ...?

The image below is from an old auction from La Galerie Numismatique where a certificate for the fourragere of the Star of Romania is paired with a red fourragere with blue stripes. This appears to be in contradiction with the book by Safta et al where the same fourragere is described as blue with red stripes.

galerie04xp2.jpg

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