Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club

Recommended Posts

Some Protective clothing/equipment:

1. A machine gunners waistcoat with padded shoulders to provide periection when carrying the machine gun or tri-pod etc. This was later replaced by using sandbags rolled up to cushion the load.

2. A bayonet-fighting mask and protective jacket used during bayonet fighting training and competitions.

3. Private purchase body armour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Better than any official national collection I have seen. Nowhere else have I ever seen the breadth oand scope of yours-- from pocket contents on up. Truly magnificent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an overview of my rifle and bayonet collection. I have tried to find a de-activated example of the variations used by South African forces in WW1. All the firearms in my collection are de-activated in accordance with South African laws. The Pattern 07 bayonets in the collection were manufactured by the various contracted companies and the collection is almost complete. Amongst the firearm collection are variations of the bayonet practice rifles or "lunges" which were used to teach bayonet fighting and competitions were also held to promote the dexterity and interest in this aspect of warfare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a very small American WW1 collection but the collection is starting to take shape now. This is the uniform of a WW1 American Engineer Sargeant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This showcase houses the display of the uniform of the Staff Captain of the 1st South African Infantry Brigade, a Brigadier-General and a Line Officer from the 1st South African Infantry Regiment. The light reflection makes it difficult to take a clear photograph but the officer's private purchase Brodie helmet carry/sling bag can be seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Detail of the Staff Officer showing trench periscope in leather carrying case, blue Brigade brassard on right arm, camera in pouch on belt, in front of him is a folding officers chair with map case and map instruments.

The Brigadier-General has a private purchase officer's Brodie helmet in his hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the uniform and equipment that was carried into battle by an Officer of the 1st South African Infantry Regiment. He still wears the rank on his cuff and carries the typical equipment used by an Infantry Officer on the Western Front. This is the last posting for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi William

An astounding collection! The S A Military History Museum staff must be very envious! I hope that one day you will get public and official recognition for making this priceless collection of part of South Africa's military history.

Regards

Brett

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2009/post-3034-1237292717.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2009/post-3034-1237292745.jpg

An original signature and portrait photograph of Sir Douglas Haig.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

British Medical Generals Cap and private purchase officer's leather trench coat, in the foreground is a officer's cap/helmet tin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The original brassard worn by the Staff Captain of the 1st South African Infantry Brigade, Major Pepper, OBE, MC, DCM. The Springbok emblem is very apparent. The blue brassard indicated Brigade Headquarters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some sundry items including an ADC brassard and a sandbag that was converted into a first aid bag by Pte Betteridge of the 4th SAI. This bag was used by him during the battle of Delville Wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outstanding! Amazing! Stunning!

You put many a museum to shame! My compliments on the set up, it's magnificent!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

Very impressive, I have never seen such a personal museum like yours. :jumping: It's incredible. Thanks for sharing with us here. Congrats

Christophe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×