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Dave Danner

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  1. I have for Dennerlein: • Prinzregent-Luitpold-Medaille and Bande der Jubiläumsmedaille für die Bayerische Armee • Militär-Verdienstorden 4. Klasse mit Schwertern • 1914 Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse • 1914 Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse • Ehrenkreuz für Frontkämpfer • Wehrmacht (Heer) Dienstauszeichnung 4. bis 1. Klasse (2.10.1936) • 1939 Spange zum Eisernen Kreuz 2. Klasse (8.6.1940) • 1939 Spange zum Eisernen Kreuz 1. Klasse (18.6.1940) • 1939 Kriegsverdienstkreuz 2.Klasse mit Schwertern (31.1.1944) • Verwundetenabzeichen in schwarz If he had the Demjanskschild, it was not mentioned in his HPA Personalakte.
  2. I would agree with Laurentius that the chain and the ribbons are to two separate people. The most likely candidate for the ribbon bars is Johannes Friedrich Albert Hugo Riemann, *14.6.1869 in Castell, Unterfranken. He was a Hauptmann in IR 138 in 1914 with the RAO4Kr. He was promoted to Major on 8.11.1914, was commanded to the Bavarian Kriegsministerium, and received the BMV4X on 6.7.1915, the BMV4XKr on 19.11.1915 and the EH3aX on 22.3.1916. He later commanded Reserve-Ersatz-Regiment Nr. 4 and retired as an Oberstleutnant. He died in 1927 in Partenkirchen. He is the only RAO4Kr/BMV4XKr/EH3aX recipient I know of who cannot be ruled out by other known decorations. Hugo entered the Army in IR 95 on 20.3.1890. The only question I have is that he was transferred from IR 95 to IR 167 on 22.3.1897 with effect from 1.4.1897, so he was not with the regiment in 1899. I am not certain what the exact criteria were for the Silberne Hochzeitsmedaille. Maybe being in the regiment for seven years, and being part of the battalion of IR 95 which was provided for the formation of IR 167 meant he was still connected to IR 95 as far as the Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha authorities were concerned.
  3. I was just going by Chinese Wikipedia, which lists 1st, 2nd, 3rd and "Special" Classes: 服務獎章 特(任职满四十年) 公教人员服务成绩优良者,于退休(职)、资遣、辞职或死亡时 1(任职满三十年) 2(任职满二十年) 3(任职满十年)
  4. Yes, that's the Hausorden von Hohenzollern. Rudolf Stark was a World War I ace and a Luftwaffe Oberstleutnant.
  5. Number 3 is a long service medal (服務獎章). It comes in 4 classes, for 10, 20, 30 and 40 years' service. It i not listed on the English Wikipedia page and there is no illustration on the Chinese Wikipedia page.
  6. It ranked before the Good Conduct Medal, after the MSM, Air Medal and the Commendation and Achievement Medals. It was moved up to after the Bronze Star in 1985. The Navy Cross is another interesting case. It was created in 1919 and made retroactive, so there are a large number of Marines and Navy personnel (mostly medical personnel and one chaplain) who received both the Army Distinguished Service Cross and the Navy Cross for the same action. Also, until 1942, the Navy Cross ranked after the Navy Distinguished Service Medal and could be awarded for meritorious service as well as valor. In 1942, the Navy changed this and Navy practice now paralleled Army practice, with the Medal of Honor at the top, the service cross as the second highest award and for valor only, and the DSM as the third highest decoration and highest decoration for merit. The Navy and Marine Corps Medal was also established for acts of valor not involving enemy action, for which a number of Navy Crosses had been awarded in the interwar period. It bothered me all the way back in the 1980s when the movie first came out that Kevin Costner's character in No Way Out should not have received a Navy Cross for the actions shown in the movie.
  7. One approach would be to pick specific units and look at their various campaigns. That way, you would be learning some more military history while deciding how your notional "Soldier A" or "Sailor B" fit into it. Some examples: 1. There are only a handful of US Army units which served in both the Asiatic-Pacific Theater and the European-African-Middle East Theater. These were units which served in the Aleutians campaign, and included the 87th Infantry Regiment, the 159th Infantry Regiment and the 1st Special Service Force (a joint US/Canadian unit). The 159th, after serving in the Aleutians, only arrived in Europe in 1945, so it saw limited action. The 87th Infantry, as part of the 10th Mountain Division, fought in the Northern Apennines and Po Valley campaigns in Italy. The 1SSF, the Devil's Brigade, received credit for the Anzio, Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno, Southern France and Rhineland campaigns, including an arrowhead for the assault landing in Southern France. 2. The US units which probably saw the most action in Europe in World War II were the regiments of the 3rd Infantry Division, who served in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, France and Germany. Audie Murphy's regiment, the 15th Infantry Regiment, had 10 campaign credits in World War II - Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe. Four of these - Algeria-French Morocco, Sicily, Anzio and Southern France - were assault landings for which the arrowhead was authorized. The division received the Presidential Unit Citation for the Colmar Pocket, while several companies and battalions of the 15th Infantry received the PUC for other actions. The regiment also received the French Fourragere. The division and its regiments also served in the occupation of Germany and in the Korean War. 3. The 32nd Infantry Division was one of the first US Army formations to enter service under MacArthur in the Southwest Pacific. It joined the Australians in the Papua campaign in late 1942, and continued on in the New Guinea, Leyte and Luzon Campaigns. Its regiments received the US and Philippine Presidential Unit Citations. The division also served in the occupation of Japan. There's an infantry bias in my examples, mainly because I was an infantry officer, but you can also research the roles played by other units - armor, artillery, aviation, etc.
  8. Friedrich-Wilhelm Viktor *28.04.1890 in Blankenburg am Harz †29.01.1951 in Königstein am Taunus Lt. (Pat. 18.8.11), IR 25, 5.10.16 OLt., OLt.a.D., served with Freikorps Lützow. reactivated in the Wehrmacht as an E-Offizier. Hptm.(E) (RDA 1.10.33), 1.3.38 Maj.(E), ... Oberst a.D. I have not seen his personnel file, assuming it is at the archives, so I can't confirm the awards and that the pictured Wehrmacht officer is Friedrich-Wilhelm. Oldenburg and Braunschweig seem more likely for a X.Armeekorps officer rather than a VIII.Armeekorps officer like Friedrich-Wilhelm. Eitel-Leopold served with 3.GRzF and the 2.Garde-Reserve-Regiment. Oberleutnant on 27.1.15, Hauptmann on 18.4.17.
  9. A few observations: 1. The Air Medal is not an Air Force-specific decoration. It is/was commonly awarded to all services. For example, in Vietnam, it was customary to award it to Army personnel like helicopter crews and aerial observers for each 25 hours of flying time over a combat zone. For the Air Force, it was usually awarded for a certain number of missions. 2. Remember that until 1947 the Air Force was part of the Army, so with regard to World War Two campaigns, the Army Air Force was usually wherever the Army was. Also, the Air Force-specific decorations like the Air Force Cross were created after the services were separated. So Army Air Force personnel in World War II received the same Army decorations as their fellow soldiers on the ground. 3. With regard to the Campaign in the Pacific, for various reasons, both political and strategic, the Allies had a two pronged-approach to Japan, which kept the Japanese from concentrating on one prong. Admiral Nimitz followed an island-hopping campaign through the Central Pacific, with Navy forces attacking the enemy and landing Marines and Army troops to seize various islands. Air bases were then set up on those islands, eventually close enough to allow bombing by Army Air Force bombers of Japan itself. Meanwhile, General MacArthur's forces moved across the land and islands around New Guinea in the direction of the Philippines. This involved mainly US and Australian Army ground troops, US Army Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force aircraft, and US Navy ships, as well as a large contribution by Philippine guerrilla forces. The Marines played a small role, as they were mostly involved in Nimitz's Central Pacific campaign. The last major land campaign in the Pacific, the attack on Okinawa, was a truly joint operation. The Tenth US Army combined an Army corps of four divisions and a USMC corps of 3 divisions, supported by a combined USAAF/USMC tactical air command and naval gunfire. When the commanding general of the Tenth Army was killed in action, a Marine general took temporary command. 4. Because the USMC was concentrated in the Pacific for operations there, there were few Marines in the European Theater. Amphibious operations by US forces, such as in North Africa, Sicily and Normandy, were conducted by Army troops.
  10. The August 1916 rank list adds the plM (5.6.16), Star and Swords to the RAO2EKr (8.5.16), EK1&2, BMJ1 (6.6.16), SH3 (2.6.16), EH1X (HSH1X) (13.6.16) and WMV1 (7.6.16) to his prewar decorations. The other Prussian decorations in the 1918 rank list entry, as well as the Hanseatic Crosses and Mecklenburg and Oldenburg awards appear to have been awarded later, or were not updated in the rank list. So, by 31.5.1915, he might only have added the Iron Cross to his prewar decorations, and maybe Oldenburg (his OV1X was dated 3.6.16, but I don't know when his Friedrich August Crosses were awarded).
  11. I don't think any other Imperial German decoration had as many different abbreviations in the official sources than the Herzoglich Sachsen-Ernestinischer Haus-Orden. To elaborate on what Daniel said: • HSH: Prussian Army and Imperial Navy / Reichsmarine rank lists, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Mecklenburg-Strelitz and Reuß j.L. court and state handbooks, Siekmann's Rangliste der Beamten der Militärverwaltung. • EH: Reichsheer ranklists. • SEH: Saxon and Bavarian rank lists, Bavarian, Saxon and Baden court and state handbooks. • HSäH: Handbuch für das deutsche Reich, Deutscher Ordens-Almanach. • HSEH: The Prussian, Württemberg , Hessen, Braunschweig and Schaumburg-Lippe court and state handbooks. • SEHO: Anhalt and Sachsen-Meiningen court and state handbook. • HSachsEH: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach court and state handbook. • icons: Sachsen-Altenburg, Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha court and state handbooks. The Prussian Königlicher Haus-Orden von Hohenzollern also has many abbreviations. The main Prussian sources used icons, as did the Reichsheer and Reichsmarine rank lists in the Weimar era. Then you have HOH, PrHoh, PrHohenz, PH, PHoh, PHH, PKHOvH, PrHvHhz, etc.
  12. If its an EK2 on the black-white ribbon and an AKw on the green-white ribbon, there are dozens of possibilities. As I mentioned above, Bezirksfeldwebel types and people at the stellv. Generalkommandos. NCOs at POW camps, as you mentioned, and at reserve Lazarette. Many of these got the EK2 rather than the EK2w if they had spent any time at the front or in the rear areas of the operational area, although in many of these cases, once they documented service at the front, they also got their AKw upgraded to an AK on the green-red ribbon. Most of the Vorschläge for the AKw are lost, and among the files that remain, there are few details, unlike the AK-Vorschläge from various front units and commands. Many non-Anhaltiners, especially among the IV.Korps personnel in Magdeburg. Many higher IV.AK personnel who received Anhalt decorations also received awards from Braunschweig and/or Sachsen-Altenburg, since parts of those states were also in the Korpsbezirk. Hamburg, though, points more toward someone with a navy connection or a native of the city-state.
  13. Anhalt generally followed Prussian Army practice for award of the so-called "non-combatant" ribbon, so an Iron Cross on the white-black ribbon (EK2w) and a Friedrichkreuz on the green-red ribbon (AK), rather than the green-white ribbon (AKw), is quite unusual. If anything, Anhalt would err in the other direction, awarding an AKw to someone who did not serve at the front whom Prussia awarded an EK2 rather than EK2w for whatever reason (typically, soldiers in Bezirkkommandos and stellvertretende Korpskommandos). So, either an error on the bar or one of a very small group of exceptions. Possibly Kriegsmarine, since navy practice on awarding the EK differed from Army practice. The only EK2w/AK combination I know of is to a Marinebaumeister. He is not your guy since he had an Oldenburg Friedrich August Kreuz. A Hamburg Hanseatenkreuz to an Anhaltiner also hints at a navy connection, though not definitively so. A possibility is Marine-Konstruktionssekretär Wilhelm Hundt, about whom I have no awards information (construction officials are not in the 1918 rank list). However, Hundt got his AK while with the Hafenbau Marinekorps, which would put him in the combat theater, so I would expect any EK2 to be on the black-white ribbon.
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