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Hello,

I collect Imperial German items mostly but recently I have wanted to add a WW1 trio to my collection to balance things out. I did buy one single medal and figured out how to look some information on the original recipient. That medal had a 5 digit number, a name, and an abbreviated name for his unit??

This week I was on the road and I found a trio and I am totally lost as to what or who this man was. I will list what the medals have on them and if you can help I would greatly appreciate it.

1914-1915 star

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR.

SHROPS. L. I.

War medal (I am not sure of the real name)

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR. R.F.C.

Victory medal

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR. R.F.C.

I know the rank and name but I am lost as to the rest. I will post pictures when I get a little more time as they are on an interesting display from Harrods - sorry I am just worn out from the drive around Lake Erie.

Thanks,

CRBeery

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Lieutenant Kerr was originally in the Shropshire Light Infantry and then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps.

I'm sure one of the British guys here can tell you whether he survived the war or not.

As an aviator, try the experts at

http://theaerodrome.com/forum/index.php

by asking about this name in their "People" sub-Forum

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Hello,

I collect Imperial German items mostly but recently I have wanted to add a WW1 trio to my collection to balance things out. I did buy one single medal and figured out how to look some information on the original recipient. That medal had a 5 digit number, a name, and an abbreviated name for his unit??

This week I was on the road and I found a trio and I am totally lost as to what or who this man was. I will list what the medals have on them and if you can help I would greatly appreciate it.

1914-1915 star

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR.

SHROPS. L. I.

War medal (I am not sure of the real name)

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR. R.F.C.

Victory medal

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR. R.F.C.

I know the rank and name but I am lost as to the rest. I will post pictures when I get a little more time as they are on an interesting display from Harrods - sorry I am just worn out from the drive around Lake Erie.

Thanks,

CRBeery

Hi,

Sounds like a very above average Trio.

He moved from the Shropshire light infantry to the Royal Flying Corps, if you are very, very lucky, he may have been a pilot !!!!!!

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AND I had time to zip down into the Vast Subterranean Archive to see if this Kerr was kindred to the Marquesses of Lothian (I don't think so), checked out the British 1935 "Who's Who?" (no joy) and the 1970 Burke's Knightage (ditto).

There's always the possibility he emigrated to the U.S. and died locally to where you picked the medals up, but DRAT our Social Security Death Index which requires a first name, date of birth AND doesn't bother with useful/crucial middle initials.

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Well, I have to admit that Royal Flying Corps did come to mind but I am not ever that lucky. Wouldn't it be funny if my first pilot group was British! I will get photos and try the link from Rick over the weekend.

THANKS!!!

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What a fantastic group!

I just did a quick check on the Commonwealth War Graves site and only 1 Lt. kerr (in the 2nd Flying Training School) of the RAF is listed. He was Lt. RW Kerr from Canada who died 12.8.18.

I don't have a copy of the Soldier's Died CD but GKG Kerr may be on it, I can ask elsewhere.

I always thought medals to the RFC where for members who didn't make it through to April 1918 when the change to RAF was made, I'm probably wrong there though.

Here's a link to the CWGC in case you turn up with more Commonwealth medals. http://www.cwgc.org/cwgcinternet/search.aspx

Tony

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War medal (I am not sure of the real name)

LIEUT. G. K. G. KERR. R.F.C.

Forgot to mention before, it's the British War Medal or BWM.

By the way, I was in the KSLI museum 2 weeks ago with Dave B. Shame we didn't have his name then as they may have had some info too.

Tony

Edited by Tony
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I might have found him.

Geoffrey Kemble Grinham Kerr

Shropshire Light Infantry, Lieutenant

Royal Air Force, Captain

He didn't turn up on the 1901 census so he could have been Scottish or even related to RW Kerr from Canada.

At least you have a name for him and may even find more info if you are prepared to pay for his medal index card download.

I wonder why the NA site has him down as a Captain and his medals don't. Acting rank maybe?

Tony

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Soldiers Died to my recollection does not include RFC officers.;)

Nick

Well that's a good reason for not finding him there. :rolleyes:

I've been told he's not in the book 'The Sky Their Battlefield' either which lists casualties from enemy action.

Tony

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Though notoriously unreliable unless verified, the Mormons show a "Geoffrey Kerr" born 25 January 1895 in London, England, married by 1930 to a June Walker (b. NY 14 June 1904) "of New York" and there are TWO subsequent generations of New York Geoffrey (unusual spelling this side, where Jeffrey is the norm) Kerrs of New York state on the Social Security Death Index. May all be red herrings.

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Hi All,

I have seen frames from time to time - usually in antique shops rather than medal fairs etc. I suspect they are a relatively frequent purchase for middle class families of officers, most often with casualties, which incorporate the 'death penny'.

The Harrods label is a nice touch, though it can get even more interesting if you have a frame made locally to the soldier - I saw one which was made up to a Wimbledon officer casualty and the framers was still there - in fact only closed about a year ago, to make way for luxury flats (naturallY).

Cheers

Gilbert

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I posted this on Aerodrome and two people have replied. I knew I was not lucky enough to get a pilot but an observer is almost as good to me considering I just bought this as a trio to an officer. I am very happy with my new group.

Thanks for all of your help.

Frank_Olynyk

Forum Ace

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He was an observer with 15 Squadron in 1916. He and his pilot (Capt. A B Adams) filed three combat reports for indecisive combats, while flying the BE 2c.

Frank.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He is also mentioned in RFC Communique No 45 where he is listed as having been wounded in action on 28 July 1916.

Graeme

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Awesome set there!

i have not seen a display frame like that before,

prolly not down here anyways...but i like it!

its nice and period looking which is part of the history of the display.

But certainly a nice find indeed! RFC...wow!

Heres my wee tribute to my Great Grandad

Leslie Gordon Forbes NZMGC

(It was huge...so i resized it and thusly lost quality...sorry)

Cheers

Paul

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