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I don't know about it,

the paper only mentions that it was awarded by the ministerie of foreign affairs...

But further... Nothinkg known.

Might be indeed the refugee's, but also possible is that he worked on an embassy as a militairy attachee??

Give me your 2 cents :)

:beer: for you too!!!

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also possible is that he worked on an embassy as a militairy attachee??

In Nijmegen ??? I noticed that's the town mentioned on the certificate and assume he must have been stationed there at the time ...

Cheers,

Hendrik

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OOOH again... :blush::banger:

How can I ever obtain my Ir and MSc with such a stupid answers and not reading papers correctly??

Indeed Reserve lieutenant of the Netherlands Army stationed in Nymegen....

Mind that he became later a Major..

But if you know the place...

Nijmegen is quite far away from the Dutch-Belgian borders...

I would doubt if they had there a refugee's camp, I thought that Refugee's camps were relatively close to the borders, so people were helped immediately when they crossed the border...

But.. I'm sure that you will correct me when I'm wrong!!

:beer: for your sharp observance!!! :D

Cheers

:cheers:

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But if you know the place...

Nijmegen is quite far away from the Dutch-Belgian borders...

I would doubt if they had there a refugee's camp, I thought that Refugee's camps were relatively close to the borders, so people were helped immediately when they crossed the border...

But.. I'm sure that you will correct me when I'm wrong!!

Or else I will... no camps were close to the border! A company of foreign soldiers might think to liberate their brothers!

Nijmegen indeed had a military prison camp which was 'host' to Belgian, British and French soldiers which 'accidently' crossed the Dutch border. If it also hosted Belgian refugees is unknown to me.

But than again: the medal could have been awarded for that, but since the man was in the reserves it could also be for something else he did during WW1 as a civilian.

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So... all options are still open.

But didn't you mention that his L" wasn't mentioned in the reference-books??

Could that mean that he hasn't asked for permission to wear them??

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So... all options are still open.

But didn't you mention that his L" wasn't mentioned in the reference-books??

Could that mean that he hasn't asked for permission to wear them??

That certainly is a possibilty. But then again, the Officer Lists are more often incomplete or totally wrong than correct, so I will just have to wait what C.P. Mulder has to say about Reserve-Major A.A. Schilleman of the 11th Regiment of Infantry.

Cheers,

Erik

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Here a few knight crosses, the one left with the little crown is one of the first types 2nd model "Belgian model" with the belgian arms in the center and the motto "l'union fait la force"

The crown is the same as the first models of the Congo free State withe the arms of "l'Etat ind?pendant du Congo" with the motte "Travaille et progres" see here

The ribbon is olso of the first type, small black line, see the difference with the other two.

The last one is an model after 1952, the motto is in French and Dutch, befor it was only in french.

Edited by g_deploige
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A group of 2 medals (Golden medal of the Order of Leopold II and the Military Decoration 1st Classe)

Golden medal is given for 20 Year Military Service to NCO's or 25 years service to soldiers and coporals and the Military Decoration 1st Classe for 15 years of Military service to NCO's and Soldiers and coporals

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oooh :o

Well, I did consider them a little older due to the french unilingual text...

But on the otherside... Thought that they had been remounted and reribbonned that did look newer!!!

I thought that medals HAVE to be bi-lingual nowadays???

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