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I have an old charge/range book, I think it's dated 1913-1915 somewhere around that time frame. I'll look for it tonight.

Eric

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btw, the "patrone" in the grenade was a 8x57 IS case, many times one of the early steal cases not good enough for battlefield ammo. they had have many problems with steel for cartridge cases so go first time only for blanks and similar.

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Just got these two minenwerfer postcards, more of an artistic slant, a nice Divisional Feldpost stamp and Kompanie stamp on back of one of them. 8.Ersatz Div. and Minenwerfer Kompanie 162

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What self respecting garden gnome wouldn't want one of THESE, fully accessorized? :love:

Oddly enough- I actually have one of these in front of my local library-quietly rusting away, painted light blue.

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From the album of Leutnant Hurst. The Minenwerfer of 52. (Baden) Division am Winterberg 1917

File0057.jpg

File0057_cr-1.jpg

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The first mine thrower, in the first post of the thread, was the 76 mm spigot mortar. There also was a 76 mm tubed mortar. The "fuze" in the photo is actually a long lanyard to pull to fire the device. This model was called "the Priester" as it was supposedly designed by a priest! (A practical application of "Gott mit Uns", I guess!) The workshop of my father's flame regiment made a version that only weighed 20 kilos and could be worn on the back like a back-pack. (You put it on the ground to fire it, of course.)

Bob Lembke

PS: "Naxos", I finally burned a CD of the Gruss thesis and will mail it when I get some packing material.

Edited by bob lembke

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PS: "Naxos", I finally burned a CD of the Gruss thesis and will mail it when I get some packing material.

Thanks Bob

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. This model was called "the Priester" as it was supposedly designed by a priest!

Hi,

the Priesterwerfer could fire the same bomb as this one, but was a totally different werfer altogether.

best

Chris

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is this any big enough I need a better scanner!

Edited by sef1962

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Thanks for the information Cnock How many types of minenwerfer are there ?

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The group belongs to

"K?nigin Elisabeth" Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr.3 (note the Garde Litzen on the collars)

Hardy

Edited by Naxos

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Thanks for the information Cnock How many types of minenwerfer are there ?

I think there was the tubed 76 mm weapon pictured just above, at least two types of spigot 76 mm mortars as discussed and pictured above (I think all three 76 mm weapons were called licht M. W., or "light mine thrower"), the 17 cm "medium" MW, and the 24.5 cm "heavy" mine thrower. The Pioniere I think served all three for a while and then the infantry (such as in the photo just above) got the light MW back, while the Pioniere continued to serve the two heavier calibers.

I would also imagine that there were variants and some odd things like pneumatic mine throwers earlier in the war, but I think that they eventually settled on the devices listed above.

Bob Lembke

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Chris,

I used to have a Granatwerfer Taube in my possession, the launcher itself is heavy enough to be fired without the base plate (no, I didn't try to fire it)

Fuzes heavy and medium Minewerfer (middle), and light Minenwerfer.

Cnock

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Hi,

the problem is that in softer ground it would be pushed into the ground without the plate.

On the solid ersatz base it could work.

Best

Chris

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Hi Chris,

yes, indeed, and that is why it was fired from the parapet of the trench in the dunes at the Belgian coast, when there was no base plate.

Cnock

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