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:speechless: I think that a good part of the answer to much of this has been in front of us all along; and I apologize for not having recognized it before :blush: .

In the naval uniform photo, Bareebin has two Orders of Glory and a Victory in Europe medal. This would indicate that the picture was taken sometime between May of 1945 (Victory) and May of 1946 (award of Glory 1st class). So, he was most likely straight army/infantry during the course of the war and then, for an indefinite time served in an unknown capacity that called for a naval uniform. This would also explain the army guards badge on the naval uniform, as pointed out by Rick.

Make sense?

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:speechless: I think that a good part of the answer to much of this has been in front of us all along; and I apologize for not having recognized it before :blush: .

In the naval uniform photo, Bareebin has two Orders of Glory and a Victory in Europe medal. This would indicate that the picture was taken sometime between May of 1945 (Victory) and May of 1946 (award of Glory 1st class). So, he was most likely straight army/infantry during the course of the war and then, for an indefinite time served in an unknown capacity that called for a naval uniform. This would also explain the army guards badge on the naval uniform, as pointed out by Rick.

Make sense?

Wild Card,

Possibly. As noted above, however, the Navy switched to the standard Guards badge during the war. Since Barybin left active duty in September 1945 and returned to civilian life (his bio entry makes no reference to continued/subsequent military service), there would have been only four-five months for him to serve in the Navy. This seems very improbable to me - especially if he went from the most senior Army NCO rank to that of a basic seaman.

You might also consider contacting one of the researchers to see if they can access the Navy archives to get a definitive answer on Barybin's potential naval service.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Edited by slava1stclass

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As I am able to mine its information (Russian language only), Airapetyan's nice little book Breast Badges of the Red Army, 1941-1945 lists 4 types with a total of 8 varieties of this naval guards badge (pp. 71-73). He seems to say it was awarded ca. 1942/43 only.

At the risk or taking us :off topic: in this very interesting thread, here is the badge in wear, G. I. Matiukhin. Clearly, this picture is after the redesign of the decorations and creation of two campaign medals (which?). So the naval badge may have lasted longer?

Edited by Ed_Haynes

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As I am able to mine its information (Russian language only), Airapetyan's nice little book Breast Badges of the Red Army, 1941-1945 lists 4 types with a total of 8 varieties of this naval guards badge (pp. 71-73). He seems to say it was awarded ca. 1942/43 only.

At the risk or taking us :off topic: in this very interesting thread, here is the badge in wear, G. I. Matiukhin. Clearly, this picture is after the redesign of the decorations and creation of two campaign medals (which?). So the naval badge may have lasted longer?

Ed,

He's wearing only one campaign medal - Defense of Leningrad. The other decoration is the Medal for Valor.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Edited by slava1stclass

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Thanks. You have better eyes than I do at this time of morning. :P

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Gents,

With nine recorded wounds (note paragraph 8.), Lt M. F. Shcherbakov was indeed a wound stripe wonder.

Regards,

slava1stclass

post-1011-066195900 1291481784_thumb.jpg

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Gents,

This unidentified veteran tops them all thus far - three gold, five red and two blue wound stripes.

Regards,

slava1stclass

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Gents,

Records are meant to be broken and so it goes with wound stripes. If this vet is legitimate (he does tend towards being a "Badgefinder"), I count 13 wound stripes on his right sleeve - nine gold and four red.

Regards,

slava1stclass

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Gents,

Records are meant to be broken and so it goes with wound stripes. If this vet is legitimate (he does tend towards being a "Badgefinder"), I count 13 wound stripes on his right sleeve - nine gold and four red.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Do you have a pic of the awards on his left breast? Probably not but I thought I'd ask.

Thanks.

Jim :cheers:

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Gents,

This vet's nine wound stripes are also noteworthy.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Our Colonel wears a Hero of the Russian Federation. Former guards. 3 OGPWs (one of which must be a 1985), 2 ORS. Bravery or Combat service(?), Germany, and then anniversary awards. Perhaps I am missing something significant under his right lapel?

But these do not seem to be the awards of a Colonel, unless the ORS's are the best he could get as long service awards. With the Hero of Russian Federation being instituted in 1992, do we know who he is and why it was awarded? (Given his age I'd have imagined him to wear an HSU instead).

Interesting!

Jim :cheers:

Edited by JimZ

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Gentlemen,

I just thought that you may be interested to see other types of wound stripes. Thanks.

Cheers,

Jim

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Gentlemen,

I would be most grateful if somene could post a nice, clear, close-up of the obverse and reverse of a BLUE wound stripe. Thanks.

Cheers,

Jim

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Gents,

Records are meant to be broken and so it goes with wound stripes. If this vet is legitimate (he does tend towards being a "Badgefinder"), I count 13 wound stripes on his right sleeve - nine gold and four red.

Regards,

slava1stclass

There is no way all of those are his, legitimately. Notice the Afghan Medal on his right side(veiwers left).

What was the blue wound stripe for? I have never heard of this one.

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Gents,

Over the years, we've seen many images of combat-decorated Red Army female soldiers. This is the first time I've encountered one with wound stripes - an unidentified Guards Junior Lieutenant medical officer.

Regards,

slava1stclass

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