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Chris Boonzaier

WW1 Uniforms...all nations

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Thanks Chris - I have so many awards, just nothing to hang them on - so when the chance came I had to jump - even if it was pretty deep!

Edited by hunyadi

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Nice tunic. I know where this piece was before it turned up on the collector market within the last six months. :cool:

The colored stripe ("Egaliserung") was worn on the collar to designate the regiment of the wearer. The Austrian uniform regulations used a combination of button colors (white/silver or yellow/gold) and a piece of colored wool to designate the regiment. This particular tunic has vegetable ivory buttons, but does have gold stars indicating metal tunic buttons would have been yellow/gold.

If you check the gold/jaeger green color combination, that will give you the particular regimental number and whether the unit was part of the "Austrian" or "Hungarian" branch of the Imperial army. I don't have the list at hand, but a quick visit to Glenn Jewison's site on the Austro-Hungarian army ought to turn that information up for you.

After 1922, the Austrian Republic used jaeger green as the standard color for all infantry collar patches.

What are Austro-Hungarian tunics priced like?

Best

Chris

They vary. Officer's tunics turn up on the market more often than enlisted tunics. Also, WWI era and post-war Republic tunics (prior to the mid-1930's) are similar enough that unscrupulous people have attempted to convert pieces. There is not a big demand for Austrian Republican uniforms from the 1922 through circa early 1930's era, while there are people who do collect WWI era items. In the US, the demand is relatively "small" and "Echte" Austrian WWI feldgrau tunics bring about a third of what a German WWI era feldgrau tunic brings. In Europe, the situation is a bit different, particular in Italy where there is a thriving market for Austrian WWI era items.

Over the last ten years, I've seen several, and would advise caution when buying these. The wartime "feldgrau" tunics were made from all sorts of material: imported German woolen cloth, captured and converted Italian tunics, Austrian made wools (which have even more variation then German WWI feldgrau uniforms with colors that can include grey, green, dirty browns) and also cottons.

Post-war Austrian Republic uniforms are very similar, but have different collar patch and color systems. I have seen altered Republic era tunics that appear to have had the collar patches removed, and "iffy" looking patches added. People attempted to turn them into WWI looking tunics, not always convincingly.

This particular piece hasn't been altered or converted. I can say that from having handling and looking at it directly. I looked at the construction methods, how the stars and "Egalisering" were attached. There is nothing suggesting the piece is anything else than what it appears.

Edited by Les

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Nice tunic. I know where this piece was before it turned up on the collector market within the last six months. :cool:

The colored stripe ("Egaliserung") was worn on the collar to designate the regiment of the wearer. The Austrian uniform regulations used a combination of button colors (white/silver or yellow/gold) and a piece of colored wool to designate the regiment. This particular tunic has vegetable ivory buttons, but does have gold stars indicating metal tunic buttons would have been yellow/gold.

If you check the gold/jaeger green color combination, that will give you the particular regimental number and whether the unit was part of the "Austrian" or "Hungarian" branch of the Imperial army. I don't have the list at hand, but a quick visit to Glenn Jewison's site on the Austro-Hungarian army ought to turn that information up for you.

After 1922, the Austrian Republic used jaeger green as the standard color for all infantry collar patches.

They vary. Officer's tunics turn up on the market more often than enlisted tunics. Also, WWI era and post-war Republic tunics (prior to the mid-1930's) are similar enough that unscrupulous people have attempted to convert pieces. There is not a big demand for Austrian Republican uniforms from the 1922 through circa early 1930's era, while there are people who do collect WWI era items. In the US, the demand is relatively "small" and "Echte" Austrian WWI feldgrau tunics bring about a third of what a German WWI era feldgrau tunic brings. In Europe, the situation is a bit different, particular in Italy where there is a thriving market for Austrian WWI era items.

Over the last ten years, I've seen several, and would advise caution when buying these. The wartime "feldgrau" tunics were made from all sorts of material: imported German woolen cloth, captured and converted Italian tunics, Austrian made wools (which have even more variation then German WWI feldgrau uniforms with colors that can include grey, green, dirty browns) and also cottons.

Post-war Austrian Republic uniforms are very similar, but have different collar patch and color systems. I have seen altered Republic era tunics that appear to have had the collar patches removed, and "iffy" looking patches added. People attempted to turn them into WWI looking tunics, not always convincingly.

This particular piece hasn't been altered or converted. I can say that from having handling and looking at it directly. I looked at the construction methods, how the stars and "Egalisering" were attached. There is nothing suggesting the piece is anything else than what it appears.

Thanks Les! This does seem to be an area where US collectors have overlooked. For fielding such a huge army in WWI, it is surprising how little of the Austrain Military's uniforms are collected in America.

Speaking of this, How often, if ever, do Turkish uniforms ever surface?? The Ottoman's had a huge empire still at the start of the war, yet I never see uniforms/medal groups to Turkish soldiers. I see Turkish medals on German tunics, but not straight Turkish. (or Romainian for that matter)

Edited by Chris Liontas

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Hello,

I'd post a few additions to the thread, but unfortunately the collection is a thousand miles away. I'll add some to the thread as soon as I'm back in town, though, some time down the road.

I've seen, I think, one Ottoman uniform for sale. It went for a very reasonable price, around $1000. However, they're rare enough that the National World War One Memorial Museum in Kansas City still doesn't have one - and they've been building their collection since the '20's! I suspect it's in part because the Ottoman Empire was somewhat distant, and their uniforms were somewhat plain. Some of the most sought-after uniforms are the simplest of field uniforms, because unlike dress uniforms their is no obvious reason to keep it looked away with mothballs for a century. That's why Union sack coats from the Civil War (produced in the millions) go for $30,000 and up, and why the M15 feldbluse is so hard to find.

I'd own more Austrian uniforms besides my single rotten tunic if they ever came up for sale. Trawling American, French, and British eBay has yielded only one good Austrian uniform for the collection. (If anyone knows of good dealers, do tell!) I have, however, picked up Japanese, Belgian, and various other odd WWI uniforms from my sources.

TTFN,

~TS

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If anyone would have Austrian uniforms, I am betting it would be Sergio Seminio. He comes upon the most rare items I have ever seen from WWI and before.

He does not speak English, but usually with small translations, he gets what you are trying to say

http://www.kunst-und-militaria.de/

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Here is a good combat uniform. Uniform of CPL Walter Francis Miller, of Portage, WI. Enlisted in Wisconsin National Guard in 1916, after Mexican expidition was incorperated into Co F, 128th Infantry during WWI. Served in the 64th Brigade, 32nd Division until 8 Octover 1918. On that date, the 64th Brigade was in support of the 63rd Brigade (32nd division) to crack the Krimhilde Stellung. CPL Miller was hit by German Artillery fire. His wounds being such, he did not rejoin the division until after the Argonne offensive.

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Nice uniforms showed here. It's not my collection area but i own to nice WW1 unifoms.

Here the first.

Ulanka M10 from Ulanen Reg. Nr 11 to an Lt. who later changed to air service.

Not the best presentation, sorry.

Regards Alex

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Nice uniforms showed here. It's not my collection area but i own to nice WW1 unifoms.

Here the first.

Ulanka M10 from Ulanen Reg. Nr 11 to an Lt. who later changed to air service.

Not the best presentation, sorry.

Regards Alex

Wow Alex!! That is an amazing tunic!! Is it named? Any history with it?

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Hi Chris,

yes it is named. Belonged to Lt. O. Kaiser from UR 11. Sometime in 1917 he changed to air service. I have him 1918 listed on air servive.

Still not known if he was pilot or observer. I suppose he was observer.

Regards Alex

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Let me send his name to a few of the guys that run "The Aerodrome" form. They have lists of German aviators that were not destroied in allied bomb raids in WWII. They might have him. That is a beautiful tunic. Very rare.

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Unfortunately one of the uggliest color combinations... the Germans say "Gruen und Blau schmueckt die Sau"...

But is is my "local unit".... 2nd Bavarian Jäger...

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Just came across this site,so nice to see information on my great grandfather Samuel Schermerhorn, thank you very much!

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Hello all

My name is Boris and I think is the first time I get into this subforum. Pleased to meet you. (Maybe i had to open a new topic but could like be presumptuous for my side)

I don't know if you know that I am making one part of the British WW1 Rank. Anyway I think that been a WW1 matter, would be a good idea to make the idea to have a walk around.

Thanks

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Hello Chris

Thanks a lot. I have an idea. A Great War Map Room. Still I don't know how to do it, but have to be someway. :banger::)

Regards

Boris

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Hello Chris

Thanks a lot. I have an idea. A Great War Map Room. Still I don't know how to do it, but have to be someway. :banger::)

Regards

Boris

Welcome to the Great War sub-forum, Boris! As Chris said, feel free to post your interests. I saw your excellent maps in the modelling sub-forum and if you have any of WWI battles they would be very interesting to see.

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Hello Irish Gunner.

Thanks very much, you are very kind. The idea is not to make the maps, that would be too slow cause each map could cost around one month and now I'm making a ranks table.

Is to make a collection or recopilation of maps with any clasification judgement. I have several interesting sources. The problem was that the imagen upload of the forum have not enough resolution for maps than needs in jpg format as less 1 to 2 megas. I attach one or two maps or Verdún. And you will see what I mean:

Then If you want download those HR maps to see the quality:

Maps

Anyway, the same I can made with images, artist WW1 specialista as Jonas, Flameng or Chagal and Otto

Dix.

One tematic exposition of artist by example.

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Well as I see this is an uniform trhead, and very good, I feel i have to inform about the uniform-ranks project cause I feel that is too much for myself.

And a question that I didn't thought and Odulf comments in the original trhead: There is renactors that could be confused by the ranks, then, all have to be perfect... as less I understood that.

The objetive is once finish each work (it is going to be support by plates) place it in the forum at the Rick Ribbon style (as Nick said)

This is the work untill now, the new work cause there is lots of old bad or not very good work.

Little details can help a lot, by example I can't find an marshall shouder badge and I don't know if it was embroidered or metalic.

Thanks very much for your patient. I am in holidays and a lot of time yet.

Regards

Boris

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One of only two preserved Serbian officers' service tunics M1908 from WW1, from my collection. Second one belonged to Tsar Nicholas II as honorary commander in chief - Colonel of the 16th IR, and is in Tsarskoe Selo - Alexander's Palace.

A book on the Serbian Army in WW1 that I recently published in Serbia with lot of material on uniforms, insignia, equipment...

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