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RAL

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  1. 'Agreed. Reading someone's ribbons in the 50's and 60's was much more interesting . . . now it is "nice" that one can get a gong for just about anything. I can remember seeing the W on an Expeditionary ribbon/medal . . . pretty damn rare on folks walking around on active duty in the early to mid 1960s. Not as rare, but enough to be noticed was the Atlantic A for Neutrality Patrol on the American Defense Service ribbon/medal.
  2. A silver star on a Navy Achievement Medal or a Navy Commendation Medal is, in both cases, indicative of a total of six awards. Somebody must have really gotten around. One might note there is no Combat V so neither, apparently, for however many awards, was combat related.
  3. ROTC would normally use just an anchor. Without the letters, that's a commissioned officer's cap device and should not be worn by a midshipman even if one were, e.g., midshipman captain, that is, the senior midshipman in a ROTC detachment, he'd still wear just an anchor device on his cap.
  4. Watched the whole thing. It appeared to me that the uniform of the day for the event was service dress, not full dress. For example, the Army four-star general I saw was wearing the new pinks & greens uniform which specifies ribbons not medals. Medals are are worn with full dress, which for the Army is blue. In the photo above all these gents are in service dress. The blue service dress worn by the Army general center front has been replaced with pinks & greens and the blue uniform is now either dress - with ribbons, or full dress with full medals. I saw no one wearing full dress
  5. With the lettering on the front, it is not a regulation USN officers cap device of any era.
  6. Hope attached helps, army jargon translated orders extract.pdf
  7. Here's a set, my father's. I've eight of these sets,oddly, only one sports a national defense ribbon (obviously not this one) . . . guess he didn't like it.
  8. Here's a set. Interestingly, the Navy Cross on the full size set is a "Black Widow" variety and I've seen miniatures of that variety, so I'm presuming the one here was procured after the fact.
  9. A T Jones is a costumer. What you have is probable a costume as opposed to a uniform. https://www.baltimoremagazine.com/2018/3/12/on-with-the-show-a-t-jones-sons-costume-shop-turns-150 You can make a reenactor discussing the accuracy of his uniform really angry if you say something along the lines of, "Oh, you were never inducted into or actually served in the German Army? Well, then, what you are wearing then is a costume, not a uniform."
  10. Who is the Colonel with the Canadian ribbons? Idle curiousity.
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