Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the information. As a new "researcher" it is more than welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great guide Dave, really clear and helpful, and also inspiring in terms of getting mroe research done!

Keep up the good work,

Gilbert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. Marvelous material! Thanks Dave!! :cheers:

It as important to understand issues of context and procedure as addressed in your essay as to understand the Russian texts in our efforts to make sense of these awards and their arcival sources.

Thanks again!! :beer:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outstanding and extremly valuable work, specially in this concentration on a few pages, Dave :beer:

Best regards

Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that information Dave as a fledgling to collecting Soviet Awards. So you have a third party to collect the information personally from the records office? Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As research is a totally new world for me, I have a lot of questions. There is only one fellow who interfaces with the Archives? If I want to contact him, I can contact one of you for his name and contact details? Then the researcher knows what to do, he goes to the Archives and copies the Award Card en Citation for me? And I assume he wants something for his services too?

Thanks,

Auke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As research is a totally new world for me, I have a lot of questions. There is only one fellow who interfaces with the Archives? If I want to contact him, I can contact one of you for his name and contact details? Then the researcher knows what to do, he goes to the Archives and copies the Award Card en Citation for me? And I assume he wants something for his services too?

Thanks,

Auke

Auke,

exactly thats, how it works. And yes, he wants something for his service of course. If you want details, send me or anyone of the others, who replied here, a pm and you?ll get a contact.

Gerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What are the non-military awards that can be researched?

How about prizes / distinguished titles?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Research of Soviet Labour Awards

What are the non-military awards that can be researched?

How about prizes / distinguished titles?

Dear Bob,

if you have access to the archives of the (former) Supreme Soviet, you might research nearly all of the Labour Orders, Prizes & Titles :cheeky: .

The fact is, that Gregory, who conducts the research of my Glory-group http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=5536 , can do the research for lower-numbered (screwback) Labour Orders. Gregory is THE expert for researching Labour Awards. If you want, I can PM his mail-adress to you.

Best regards :beer:

Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, please do. Might already have it but want to get some first research done on some awards I have so any / all routes are good:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, please do. Might already have it but want to get some first research done on some awards I have so any / all routes are good:)

Dear Bob,

I already sent a PM to you with Gregory's e-mail-adress.

Best regards :beer:

Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob,

So did I, two days ago.

Yep - thanks. I guess I was almost expectin there to be more than just 1 person doing research - guess I was wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest I expected that too - why only one person who conducts the research for all of us? He must be a busy man...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest I expected that too - why only one person who conducts the research for all of us? He must be a busy man...

Gregory is a busy and highly valueable man :D .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that currently there are a lot of intermediary's:

Alex: http://www.russian-awards.com/ResearchServices.htm

Alexei: http://home.netcom.com/%7Emerezhko/research.html

Eugene: http://www.russianglory.com

But do they all deal with Gregory? It seems that Alexei is really fast and provides scans instead of xerox copies:

http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=21529

Who knows more?

Auke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Auke,

also researcher Gregory provides now scans and no more xerox copies, as you can see by the latest research of my Glory-Trio: http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?s=&showtop...st&p=198433 :D .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

To all:

Logistically, it's a lot easier to save a digital copy (should he receive additional requests for the same research) than it is to trudge on over to Podolsk for repeat hard copies. Digital age = greater efficiency = higher profit margins.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All:

It's back! Sorry for the vacation. :rolleyes:

Now, of course, I can't guarantee that you'll get back things in a timely manner, but hey - it's still worth a shot! This was the fun of collecting Soviet awards for me for over a decade.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
    • I know the way I got into collecting is like so many other people; through a sibling. I also know that my love of history is barely unique in a place like this. So I know I have a shared background with many people. A less shared area - perhaps - is that I've always loved the thrill of the chase. When I decide I want, say, a 1914 trio with an original bar, to a cavalry unit, the utter thrill of getting out there and, (a) finding groups that fit the criteria and, (b) comparing them re: ranks, uni
×
×
  • Create New...