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Thank you . dealer offered it to me for $375 with shipping . i may do it since I know it’s a good MVK2 ?

My group with a MVK3kr x...

Hello Chuck, The enamel looks fine on your MVO 4th with Crown and Swords by Weiss u. Co.  Each maker (Weiss, Leser, Gebruder Hemmerle, etc) had their own blue enamel shade.  Your enamel is of the

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NFW!!! WEISS made that daisy-L robust "Czech" lion? Wowwweeeee!!! Is it filed on all the edges, or better than that?

My FREAKY all silver/frosted Weiss has the cipher up onto the rim:

[attachmentid=19616]

no daisies!! Looks like small intestines, maybe, on the lower bit!! Weiss is my least favorite maker, for general "low bid" work like this.

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The cross-less, one-piece MVKs are smoother edged on the ciphers because the enamel laps up all around uniformly, without the expected rough edges of teensy, tiny, hand fitted separate disk devices.

From an MVK2XmKr

[attachmentid=19619]

Whereas on the real silver M1905-13 MVK2s, without enamel, the center devices (silver for this class) were ALSO separate pieces like the Order's cipher and lion. Being silver, presumably "easier" to work on at this microscopic level than softer gold. I doubt very much there were more than say 300 of these, so the "fit" is of much higher quality than even the wartime Orders:

[attachmentid=19620]

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Gentlemen,

It's been a while since we have had a good old fashioned discussion about a particular decoration and it's various forms and variations.

With good participation and sharing of information, we could build a valuable reference base. Let's stay away from something that only

one or two of us, if any, would be interested in...

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Although sometimes referred to as 4th class, as far as I know, these crosses were 3rd class pieces made out of zinc and war metal.

They were made and awarded from 1918-1920. I do not know who made these crosses and as far as I can tell, this one is unmarked.

Have fun Gentlemen -

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Although sometimes referred to as 4th class, as far as I know, these crosses were 3rd class pieces made out of zinc and war metal.

They were made and awarded from 1918-1920. I do not know who made these crosses and as far as I can tell, this one is unmarked.

Have fun Gentlemen -

Hello, only Deschler made those.

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Ever wondered how these were made?

Let's have look inside (autopsy performed on destroyed 3rd class by Leser...someone was upgrading it from MVK with swords to MVK without swords...or was it downgrading?)

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That's a variant I haven't seen before. The central medallions appear rather large in relation to the rest of the cross and the swords seem to be attached without the rivet normally seen.

The central medallion is usual size but the arms are smaller! Sure the swords attached without the rivet. The loop is not a standart one also.

Edited by stukapilot
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War time - Lauer, Hemmerle, Leser, Deschler, Weiss

Postwar - Godet, S&L

I'm not aware of any other.

Can someone explain how to identify each type ? I possess 5 or 6 cross, and I'd like to know the maker !

:cheers:

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