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Wound Badge Evolution


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Oval badge with white enamel? I think we are talking about this one. There is a whole family of these badges out there. It is "on the occasion of ..." badges. Association started issuing them in

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This one looks very much like honorary member of imperial military reservist association gold gilt badge on outer orange ribbon (2nd type of honor badge that was in use after 1940). Here it is for comparison.

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For high rank executives of Imperial Wounded and Disabled Soldiers Association we have this very original badge.

It seems that there were two classes of this badge.

Gold gilded badge for top level executives and silver for middle level executives.

But there is a probability that this gold/silver variation was just a consequence of different manufacturers.

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Another type of wounded association membership badge (later and most numerous of them all) is this specimen (we will call it “general” badge). It was introduced in late 30s. Here comes its obverse.

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In addition to general wounded soldiers association badge practically every branch of association established and issued its own badge.

The design of these badges is practically matching of general badge.

Only the central chrysanthemum is bigger and in its center prefecture emblem (usually clan crest) is imposed.

Usually these badges have individual number on reverse and additional information about issuing branch.

Hopefully next compilation will give us general idea about the design of these interesting badges.

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Who’s this dude?

Yep. Sometimes you can hear this question in connection to type 4 wound badge.

Kusunoki Masashige (1294 - July 4, 1336) was a 14th century samurai and national hero who epitomized loyalty, courage, and devotion to the Emperor (this point if view was especially popular during 30s).

Wanna more? Go to http://en.wikipedia....unoki_Masashige

But before that, take a look at this portrait of our prototype hero.

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Document number: 8426

Recipient name: Murakami Hisakichi-san

Dated: January 9, 1941

Wound type: shell splinter hit at right thigh

Wow, even naming the location and type of wound? Fascinating!!!

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My jaw drops at viewing your collection of wound badges, as I sit here with only one in my collection.

I've said it before and I'll say it again.

What a great post and the range of your collection of wound badges is fantastic.

Thanks again for this top notch post Nick.

Regards

Brian

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My jaw drops at viewing your collection of wound badges, as I sit here with only one in my collection.

I've said it before and I'll say it again.

What a great post and the range of your collection of wound badges is fantastic.

Thanks again for this top notch post Nick.

Regards

Brian

Hi Brian

Thank you for kind words.

Of course not all badges are from mine collection ;)

That's why I want once more to express my gratitude to my colleagues and friends (in fact they are GMIC members too) for their invaluable help.

And I dare to say second little appendix is coming in the next few days.

Regards,

Nick

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some wound badges were signed on reverse by their owners (same goes for the pilot badges and army/navy classification badges). However I saw only type 4 signed badges. Here is a nice example of such signed badge.

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