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Gents,

One of my passions is collecting German Trench Photos. I look at their facial expressions and contemplate what they must have been thinking. Trying to put their minds in a better place of being home with their friends and family or are they trying to forget the horror and carnage of a War thought to end all Wars....

Cheers,

Joel

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Here is an interesting German Look-out post.

Edited by buellmeister

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Joel, great photos my friend. Just recently have I really started to appreciate images like these. Many thanks for posting these.

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My pleasure! I have always loved these pictures and other's who have the same please post away!

Regards,

Joel

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The Feldwebel in charge of the regimental laundry takes time out for an overview of the 6th Guard Infantry Regiment's sector at Dombras in the Bois de Caures, 6 May 1916:

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Rick,

Great Additions! Love them all. Especially, the picture of the Stormtrooper's with their gas masks at the ready.

Edited by buellmeister

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I'm not sure if this photo is staged or not, but it is interesting. I suppose the lack of helmets would indicate either a posed photo or a picture taken during a training session where you try to fire while wearing your mask.

Chip

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Chip,

I am leaning toward your assessment of a possible training picture as well. Great picture!

Regards,

Joel

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Hi,

Excellent photos. It's interesting to try and get a feel for what these men were going through/thinking at the time they were photographed.

Regards,

Sam

P.S. Those "pork pie" hats were just awful looking. I understand they were not real popular with the troops either. Another benefit of making NCO; get a visor for your mutze :D

Edited by sambolini

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Hello Joel,

This POW has been through a lot....

Jef

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Jef,

My apologies on not commenting on this picture earlier.. The strain is certainly very apparent on this guy. Great picture!

Regards,

Joel

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Guy's,

Here is another picture that came in the mailbox. Not exactly in the Trenches. However, I love the barbed wire in the background and as well as, the amount of soldier's who earned their Iron Crosses.....

Regards,

Joel

Edited by buellmeister

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Gents,

Here is another that just arrived. Though, not exactly a trrench picture, I think this one constitutes for telling a story all in it's own.

Regards,

Joel

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Lt. peters: "Our observationpost (Klinuki) in in the front lines in Tarbok: June 25, 1915

Uttroffcr. Garlius left

Uttroffcr. Bossert right

Lt. Peters (without hat)

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Positions in front of the II/249 in (Zolkyuier?), August, 1916-dead Russians:

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Lt. peters

25 july 1915

Explosion of russian shrapnel above our lines:

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Gents,

Here is another addition to my picture collection which just arrived. Love the EKI! Dated 20.9.17 Taken in Flanders.

Regards,

Joel

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Gents,

Here is another recent arrival. Nice shot of an Officer with his, by the looks, newly awarded EK2.

Regards,

Joel

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Meldehunde, Courier dogs at the Front

Regards, Hardy

File0225.jpg

File0226.jpg

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Naxos,

Is there any addtional information written on this card?

Chip

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