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Feldpost / Fernmeldsonderpersonal

Fernmeldsonderpersonal

---Hoherer Dienst

---Gehobener Dienst

---Mittlerer Dienst

---Einfacher Dienst

Horchdienst (H)

---Gehobener Dienst

---Mittlerer Dienst

Nachrichtenwesen (N)

---Hoherer Dienst

---Gehobener Dienst

---Mittlerer Dienst

Telegraphen-technische Beamte bei Nachrichtentruppen (Post T)

---Hoherer Dienst

---Gehobener Dienst

---Mittlerer Dienst

---Einfacher Dienst

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This is a work in progress. I have wanted to post this for quite some time but was always waiting for another piece to arrive, at that rate I will never get it done, so I have decided to start now.

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Thanks for the photo Roman.

With permision from Roman Slivin I have copied his photo here, and have added what info I have found out about him. many thanks to Diane Schriber for the following info

"One is a senior NCO / Paymaster candidate. When he finished his probationary candidacy he'll upgrade the boards. Note, also that senior NCO's who were officer candidates were authorized to wear Officers type collar tabs and chin cords on their visor caps."

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With kind permission from coldstream I also copied his photo here. It is been confirm as noted by Paul, that he is wearing shoulder cords (Schulterschn?re) instead of boards. I am trying to find more info on when this was in effect.

"The Admin Officer appears to be wearing the thinner wartime officials shoulder cords."

Edited by Laurence Strong
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  • 4 weeks later...

PaulR..go to WherAwards,new pictures section,item #3679..Petz foto.Looks like NCO beamte a k portrait.Please give your eval.I have a huge image collection and my beamte section is growing nicely. I tried sending you a private message but could not find a Paul R address. John Wilson

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Sweet photo. :cheers: Of the top of my head I would say he is a Sonderfuhrer wearing the 1939 regulation shoulder cords and collar tabs. Here is a pair off boards for a Sonderfuhrer post "Z" with the same device on a set of 1940 regulation boards. I would love to see more of your photo's John :jumping::jumping: Many thanks for the link

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  • 2 months later...

New item. :jumping:

Great job Larry!! Second pattern Sonderfuhrer boards are not easy to find. I love that cypher!! Congratulations!

Roman, another amazing board. Early Admin boards are also very rare, especially in that high ranking!

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  • 2 weeks later...

My father entered the Heeresverwaltung in 1936. Until that time he had been in the infantry. He was a Zahlmeister / Oberzahlmeister /Stabszahlmeister with the XXX Armeekorps. In 1944 he was transferred to the newly-formed TSD - Truppensonderdienst, but I don't think he ever got the new insignia. he an my mother were maried June 3, 1944 and he is still wearing the "HV" on his boards. The collar tabs no longer had the white piping, just the dark green in the middle of the Kragenspiegel.

I have almost all his medals, documents and lots of photos. He was a career soldier, having joined the Reichswehr in 1925.

I am almost through with my book of his military life.

Arnim

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My dad was a paymaster. The buttonhole ribbons were the KVKII / Ostrfront/ Romanian Crusade.

Father served with Manstein's 11th Army in the Crimea, later at Leningrad, the Rzhev Salient and at Voroshilovgrad. Before that he was in France, East Prussia, Bulgaria, Romania and Greece.

Arnim

Edited by Arnim
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Very interesting family history. Thank you for sharing it Arnim :cheers:

Thank you for sharing these treasures with us here! I cannot read the documents as the letters are too small for me. I assume that the first two are for promotions? Can you help me with these?

Did he volunteer to go into the TSD in 1944, when that program emerged?

Regards

Paul

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Yes, these are his promotion documents. I'm not sure one volunteered for the Truppensonderdienst. I believe it was simply a reorganization. By August, 1944 father was assigned to the 49th Infantry Division near Paris but he never reached them. He got as close as Beauvais, but the Canadians and Brits attacked across the Seine and he ended up in Dunkirk for the rest of the war. He was assigned to a regimental battle group. He earned an EKII at Dunkirk in 1945. At the end of the war he stayed there for two months while they lifted mines and got the town ready for civilians, then he became a guest of the French army until February, 1948 when I first greeted him with the words "Tag Karl."

He left a lot of stories, most of his documents and medals and lots of photos. Being on a corps staff he met a lot of high-ranking men.

Arnim

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  • 1 month later...

He was awarded the EKII at Dunkirk in 1945. He was a member of "Festung Duenkirchen" assigned to Kampfgruppe Scharnhorst. He was there until war's end, then went into captivity until February 1948 when I finally met him.

Arnim

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