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So they used the same collar tabs for gehobener and mittlerer Dienst?

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Heeresbeamter auf Kriegsdauer,

Left to right: Höheren Dienst - Gehobene Dienst - Mittleren Dienst

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So they used the same collar tabs for gehobener and mittlerer Dienst?

The standard book "Die Deutsche Wehrmacht - Uniformierung und Ausrüstung" Band I - Das Heer, by Adolf Schicht & John R. Angolia, on page 343 says:

Beamte des mittleren Dienstes im Offizierrang: They collar tabs identical to those of Beamter des gehobenen Dienstes. To distinguish these two, per Vfg.v. 10.4.1940 (HV 40B, Nr.269) new collar tabs were introduced: hand embroidered and identical but significantly more narrow.

Beamte im Unteroffizierrang: collar tabs of woven fabric, and greyish white or grey.

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I had this set, rescued from a moth infested jacket (Gehobene Dienst)

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I have found a page that provides detailed info on the collar patches: http://moebius.freehostia.com/beamten1.htm

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Thank you WTH for this very useful link!

This is by far the most useful and comprehensive outline I have ever seen, about this complex matter (to my opinion).

Still I would advice, for a deeper insight, the source I have mentioned above, because it adds dates and other relevant background information, if the book is still available...

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A fairly recent addition to my collection is this soldbuch to Stabszahlmeister Alfred Lehmann...

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Personal details & Units. He served with Verpflegungsamt 4 up until at least 16th Oct 1942 (verified by a slip of paper in the SB for the issue of a pistol with that units FpNr) but obviously managed to leave that unit before it was destroyed at Stalingrad.

Edited by hucks216

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Finally, his Lazarett pages and also his awards - KvK II & I Kl mit Schwertern & the Ost Medal.

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He was lucky to escape Stalingrad!! Great book!

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With many thanks to Kevin (Hucks216) i was able to find a HV Soldbuch Its for a lagermeister - which I believe would be a storesman. He has Elecvated tabs and NCO boards. Sweeeet :D

Once again many thanks Kevin :)

I will post more when it gets here.

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NICE!!! Can you do a closeup scan of the photo? Beamte candidates wore this combination as well. After the probationary period, they were given an Officer grade.

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Hi Paul

At this time that is the best I can do with it. I took it from the advert that was on the website I bought it off of. It hits the mail today and is coming from Florida so it should not take too long to get here. I also believe he was an Officer aspirant. And yes they were allowed the elevated grade tabs prior to promotion.

later

Larry

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Hi! Zu dem Thema:

Mittlerer Dienst (schmale Form)

Waffenfarbe weiss

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Hi! Zu dem Thema:

WH-Beamte, mittlerer Dienst (schmale Form)

Waffenfarbe weiss

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Hi! Zu dem Thema:

WH-Beamte, mittlerer Dienst (schmale Form)

Waffenfarbe weiss

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Danke! :)

Heeresbeamte a.K. gehobener Dienst, "matte Version"

Edited by Andrew42

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Finally scored a Soldbuch, Kevin (Hucks216) has been kind enough to send me some links on these, the first one I sent my money and I am still waiting - 6 months later - I sent an email to the owner asking to confirm my shipping address but never recieved a reply.....it was a sweet one to an Unteroffizier. Can't remeber what happen with the others however they did not pan out.

This one is to a Zahlmeister Karl Jack

Entitled to the 1914 EK2 BWB 1918, and the WW1 Vetrans Cross SA Sports badge and the KvK2 mit Schwerten

Served with front-Stalag 190 a feild POW camp in France, in June 1942 the was renamed Dulag 190, He then moved on to a transitional POW camp of the 6th Army in southern Russia, before moving to Dulag 111, also in Southern Russia In 1942 he served in a POW camp in Alsace. 1943 -45 he served with Kgf.Bau-und-Arbeits-Btl.1 a POW labour unit in northern Norway

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