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Laurence Strong

belgian Order of Leopold l

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Copy... hmmm... traded it for an unknown obscure African continent Order :unsure:

Oh well... you win some, you lose some...

Depends on what the "obscure" african order was....

Jacky

:shame: How can any copy have more (historical)value than the real thing? :speechless:

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:shame: How can any copy have more (historical)value than the real thing? :speechless:

OK, bit :off topic:

But here's what I traded it for, any of you gents have an idea what it is?

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ooooh I knew that order,

The three star order of virginity of the sahara, :P

very very rare, :cheeky:

as there are hardly any virgins in the desert!!! :speechless:

No, just joking, couldn't find it on Internet, maybe are there any clues on the back??

Kind regards,

Jacky

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Nope, just some standard silver marks, will look up the scan later, have to go to work now (already running late!)

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Knights level Civilian Division

If I am not mistaken Gustave Wolfers is one of the better Belgian medal makers, though I am not sure how to tell if the medal is genuine too the case

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The medal itself, again I believe the I in the center of the reverse indicates it's from the reign of Leopold I (1831 -1865)

Edited by Laurence Strong

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Close up of the reverse again very fine work in my opinion.

Thanks for looking :cheers: Always open to your comments and opinions. Could this be the right medal for the case?

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The medal itself, again I believe the I in the center of the reverse indicates it's from the reign of Leopold I (1831 -1865)

Beautiful cross and a very nice acquisition, Laurence ! And your pictures show that great "old" red enamel perfectly :love: - any markings to be found in the suspension ring ???

I'm not so sure about your dating though. I'm certainly no expert on it but rather think your knight's cross is of the type used between 1900 and 1918, judging by its crown suspension shape. Could any of the more informed forum members confirm this or correct me ?

In fact, it wouldn't do any harm if anyone could give some tips on what to watch out for in order to properly date the various "types" of this order - any hints as to how to recognize specific maker's differences would also be welcome. Every scrap of information in that respect would be useful !

Cheers,

Hendrik

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Hi Hendrik

What I did was

a: miss read, and then;

b: missquoted this post

Dear Jef

There are no marks in them, even in the first crosses made in 1832 some time you find the monogram with I in the middle, what is sure is that those with a II are made by Heremans, periode of Leopold II, at the periode of King Albert I we find some time back a I in the Monogram. ;)

My dating was defientely a little "off". No marks that I can see of.

I agree about the enamel work, it was the first thing that caught my eye when i open the box, the colours are really vibrant and translucent.

Thanks for the kind words from both of you

Edited by Laurence Strong

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In fact, it wouldn't do any harm if anyone could give some tips on what to watch out for in order to properly date the various "types" of this order - any hints as to how to recognize specific maker's differences would also be welcome. Every scrap of information in that respect would be useful !

If Pat would read this, he would probably just say: "Just wait, my book is forthcoming!" :rolleyes:

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Pat? and which book?

Captain-Commandant (ret'd) Pat van Hoorebeke of the Belgian Army Museum is about to publish his book on the Belgian Orders and its suppliers. Should have been finished last October, however...

He's knows quite a lot about boxes, maker's marks, types, etc.

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Thanks Erik, any link to his book?

Not yet, as soon as it's published I guess Guy will post something on it! (@ Guy?)

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Not yet, as soon as it's published I guess Guy will post something on it! (@ Guy?)

It will be there hopely end of this year, the Royal Army Museum will do an exhibition about the Belgian National Orders and specialy about the 175 aniversery of the Order of Leopold. By that occasion normaly the book of our dear Pat will be Publiched, but first there will be a remake of the book of Ren? Cornet, about the l?gislation of the belgian orders, adapted by Pat, with beautifull pictures made by BC. So some day it will be there :rolleyes:

But my book about the french Imperial orders would be first (no more command on that, ... only that it will be beautifull) ;)

Edited by g_deploige

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Beautifull one for merit in the Corea war!

Kind regards,

Jacky

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Wow I just noticed we have our own Belgium forum now. Thanks Nick :rolleyes::cheers:

Anyways. were these for real or is it made up. it's probably as close as I might get to the real deal!!

Edited by Laurence Strong

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