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Hello to all,

I was pleased to find this medal bar at the SOS. I had walked through almost the entire show without finding a medal bar that I had to have. Then I found this gem in the third from last row. Hope you like it as much as I do.

Best regards,

Tom

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In a word-wow!

Do you realize just how rare that bar is?

@ 1941-42 I reckon....it screams somebody wearing a brown uniform in Bavaria and working for the state somehow.

Thanks to everyone for the comments.

Ulsterman: Thanks for your comments. Yes, I do realize that a bar like this is rare and I also agree with your estimate on a '41 or '42 assembly. I was very lucky to find this bar at the SOS and I can't believe that someone going through the show ahead of me didn't want it. When I look at this bar, I do see the brown uniform of a political leader in Bavaria. Taking it a step further, I wonder: Was this guy from Munich? Maybe a personal friend of the Führer? Could this guy have also been a recipient of the Blutorder? If this guy would have upgraded his medal bar in '44 or '45, would he have had the 25-Year NSDAP LS Cross on his bar? Questions, I'm sure, that will never be answered but it is nice to dream.

Best regards,

Tom

Edited by tyanacek
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Tom,

Nice bar. I prefer to buy bars without the Hindenburg on them but I would buy this one as it is an all cross bar and to go 7 places without a gong is rare! I like this kind of bar.

Hello CRBeery,

I agree that a seven-place bar with all decorations in cross-form is rare indeed. But your comment about going seven places without a "gong" made me laugh.:D Don't ever recall hearing that terminology for a round medal before, but I will certainly remember it now.

Best regards,

Tom

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Thanks to everyone for the comments.

Ulsterman: Thanks for your comments. Yes, I do realize that a bar like this is rare and I also agree with your estimate on a '41 or '42 assembly. I was very lucky to find this bar at the SOS and I can't believe that someone going through the show ahead of me didn't want it. When I look at this bar, I do see the brown uniform of a political leader in Bavaria. Taking it a step further, I wonder: Was this guy from Munich? Maybe a personal friend of the Führer? Could this guy have also been a recipient of the Blutorder? If this guy would have upgraded his medal bar in '44 or '45, would he have had the 25-Year NSDAP LS Cross on his bar? Questions, I'm sure, that will never be answered but it is nice to dream.

Best regards,

Tom

I can answer the last one from my own research-in all likelihood (odds 20:1) NO-no 25 year LS.

Why? Because of what happened in Spring, 1943.

But I doubt he had the Blutorder too, but there were exceptions. I do think he was in the party by early @ 1928 though and probably knew Rohm better than Hitler.

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I do think he was in the party by early @ 1928 though and probably knew Rohm better than Hitler.

Hi Ulsterman,

Thanks for sharing your insight.

OUCH!!!!!! Knowing Röhm a little too well could get you killed in 1934.:violent::speechless1:

Best regards,

Tom

Edited by tyanacek
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I never realized that the KVK would go ahead of the State bravery award. Was this a standard practice for a merit medal in the III Reich??

Hello Chris,

Not only was it a standard practice but it was the regulations. I think Hitler wanted to elevate the prestige of his own regime's decorations while lowering the prestige of Imperial State valor and merit decorations.

Best regards,

Tom

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Here is a picture of the reverse:

The Cross of Honor is by Carl Poellath in Schrobenhausen, Bavaria. Seems to make sense that a medal bar assembled in Bavaria would use medals produced by Bavarian manufacturers wherever possible.

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Here is a picture of the reverse:

The Cross of Honor is by Carl Poellath in Schrobenhausen, Bavaria. Seems to make sense that a medal bar assembled in Bavaria would use medals produced by Bavarian manufacturers wherever possible.

Hi

Just out of curiousity I have two questions:

1. what is that stunning looking second from last brown thing with brown ribbon?

2. Why do ribbons from the same periode on one good bar look brand new here and completely worn out on another bar?

regards

David

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Hi

Just out of curiousity I have two questions:

1. what is that stunning looking second from last brown thing with brown ribbon?

2. Why do ribbons from the same periode on one good bar look brand new here and completely worn out on another bar?

regards

David

Hello David,

1. The second from last medal on the bar is the NSDAP 10-Year Long Service Cross. It was awarded for 10 years of active membership in the Nazi Party.

2. There are many different variables that affect the condition of a medal bar, such as exposure to ultraviolet radiation, exposure to adverse weather conditions, storage conditions, how many times the bar was worn, and how well was it cared for over the years. It is the same as with any other kind of militaria or anything else for that matter: Examples can be found in mint condition, some will be found in poor condition, and many will be found in varying conditions between the two extremes. Let me say that for medal bars, though, it is not at all unusual to find them in excellent condition. In most cases, medal bars were only worn on a few occasions. They were stored away indoors and cared for by their owners. A medal bar, in many cases, represented a person's career and accomplishments over several decades so I'm sure the owner looked on it with pride and wanted to keep it in the best condition possible. The medal bar I showed in this thread is obviously one that has been well-cared for over the years. Even so, I can tell you that the ribbons and medals on this bar display those subtle signs of natural age that cannot be duplicated by artificial means. The pictures probably do not bring out all these subtle indicators of age but, in-hand, the age and authenticity is so very evident.

Best regards,

Tom

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