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Per the other post there was only one Haverkamp and he went into the Reichheer. The Haverkamp listed in the 1924 Army RL has the EK1, Black Would Badge, BMV4xKr and ÖM3K. He was with 19 Bayern IR and was a Hauptman. The awards don't match.

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Hello Chris.

Congratulations for this find. I have never seen a group belonging to a former member of one of the regiments entitled to the "Gibraltar " cufftitle. Thanks for showing it to us.

And thanks to Dave Danner for a concise description how the "Gibraltar" cufftitle came to be and was reinsstituted by Wilhelm II.

Bernhard H. Holst

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Possibly a civil servant long service award (with Swaz) or one of the 20-30s let me buy an award type of thingy. Measure the distance from the hook where the medal would hang from to the bottom of the row of awards. Everything else is in a nice straight line so what you are looking for should equal that distance. Perhaps a Kyffhauserbund.

Edited by dond
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Hi,

I am guessing a Kyffer... if he recieved the 3rd reich civil servant, he would have recieved a Hindy before that...

Most logical is a Kyffer , removed when they were forbidden... then never having the bar finished... He died in 1955, so he must have got a Hindy...

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A Lt.d.R. Fritz Haverkamp appears twice in the Verlustlisten. He appears in Prussian Verlustliste Nr. 780 of 10 March 1917 as "leicht verwundet" and Prussian Verlustliste Nr. 1014 of 14 December 1917 as "schwer verwundet".

He was born on 29 March 1893 in Lienen, Elsfleth, Großherzogtum Oldenburg. I assume that's your guy? A native of Oldenburg, and as Andy noted, originally commissioned into Infanterie-Regiment Bremen, so that would fit the awards. Only two wounds in the casualty lists, but if he lost a leg on that second one, that would get him the Verwundetenabzeichen in mattweiß, right?

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Magic Dave!

I am guessing he was posted to the 73rd After his March 1917 wound.

I wonder if he is the officer that took over Ernst Jüngers Company? Lets say he was wounded in March, hospital and Ersatz kompagnie... Jünger says a new Dienstältester officer from the Ersatz Kompagnie took over the kompany in July 1917. Haverkamp was wounded in Flanders, and the next Chapter Jünger has the company again.

The fact that Haverkamp turned up in Jüngers Dugout to go on a "drunken patrol" would seem to imply they were in the same company as it is doubtful an officer would cross company lines for something like that...

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Don seems to be the eagle eye...

I must admit i had wondered why the Ehrenkreuz ribbon had been removed... I had so much happening this week I did not really look closely... indeed the Ehrenkreuz is too high...

As per Dons Suggestion, I measured it up with a kyffhäuser medal... it fits perfectly from the height.

Alos, reading the letter, the group came with EK1 and 2, bremen Cross, Wound badge in Silver, and 2 awards that the man did not recognise... (The Oldenburg)... I suppose the Ehrenkreuz was added along the way to complete it.

So, based on logic, but not proof, I am guessing it is a case of the Kyffer being removed... and for whatever reason, he did not get around to applying for or at least mounting the Ehrenkreuz...

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Possible, but unnesesarry cost? The Kyffer had to go anyway on the 3rd reich bar... Would have taken a tailor a few minutes to exchange the Kyffer for an Ehrenkreuz.... much cheaper than ordering a totally new bar, especially because the bar is in pretty good condition.

I think we exchange things much easier nowdays than back then.

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Possible, but unnesesarry cost? The Kyffer had to go anyway on the 3rd reich bar... Would have taken a tailor a few minutes to exchange the Kyffer for an Ehrenkreuz.... much cheaper than ordering a totally new bar, especially because the bar is in pretty good condition.

I think we exchange things much easier nowdays than back then.

Unless he ended up with two items needing mounted, a hindy and perhaps an LS medal. What did he do after the war?

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Unless he ended up with two items needing mounted, a hindy and perhaps an LS medal. What did he do after the war?

Hopped around from job to job... ;-)

I am guessing no Post 1917 service due to amputation, and just regular national service before the war, so probably no LS.

I wish I did know what he did after the war just to complete the history....

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Wow Chris!! Nice group from a nice RGT. You've got the magic touch. Is he mentioned in Junger's book??

Jup indeed... the man of many vices... once because he and a brother officer were drunk and danced around under fire in front of the french lines collecting the silk from French parachute flares... the second time he was badly wounded puffing away on a cigarette....

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