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Treuedienst award sermony.


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Hello Gentelmen!

Thanks all for comment.I have not a scanner.

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-1000-0-67713100-1410095459.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-1000-0-99234900-1410095477.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-1000-0-09428700-1410095518.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-1000-0-58850400-1410095533.jpg

Best regards,Morten.

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The so called "Sonderstufe" of the Treudienst-Ehrenzeichen was in gold (gilted) AND on the 12 o'clock arm of the cross the decoration had the number "50".

In the photo I do not see the number "50" on the cross.

The "Treudienst-Ehrenzeichen" could be issued to long serving civil servants (per Decree from 30 January 1938) after 25 years service (2nd class) and 40 years (1st class), and for 50+ years as a "Sondersufe" (extra class). The awards were put on halt from 1-3-1943 until "after the war".

Let's not jump to early conclusions...

What would be the age of the recipient? If he was qualifying for the Sonderstufe he must have started his continuous career at a very young age.

Perhaps the omission of the "50" cyphre on the cross and the "50" in a wreath on the wall leads to the conclusion that it is his 50th birthday, and the Ehrenzeichen is for 25 years (2nd class) or (more unlikely) 40 years (1st class).

Edited by Odulf
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Hi,

I support, that "... the "50" in a wreath on the wall leads to the conclusion that it is his 50th birthday, and the Ehrenzeichen is for 25 years (2nd class) ...". There is no 50 in the upper arm, and he is in my opinion to young for it.

Please notice, that a man can only have the Ehrenzeichen for 25 and for 40 years, but that the same man can not have the Sonderstufe for 50 years too.

And a man, who had been decorated with the Sonderstufe for 50 years, can not have the Ehrenzeichen for 25 and for 40 years before.

Uwe

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Odulf,

It was a silver cross with a gold wreath the 50 was also gold on silver so not that clear to see if it were there at least not on my computer, I was hoping some one could zoom in a bit, when I do it goes pixelated. If he is 50 and it is his birthday then he has had a very hard paper round. Another possibility is Golden Hochziet I suppose? I was hoping it would be a 50 as I have never seen a picture of one in wear. I also thought it was for a private sector worker and not officials or Beamter, I read that somewhere recently and it may not be correct? That is why the reverse is for true labour as opposed to true service? I don't know for sure so I'm asking?

Cheers

Jock :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Guys,

While searching for the SS/Polizei thing I stumbled on this and it appears the sonderstuffe has no mention of Beamter and seems on the face of it to be for the private sector as at 1938 anyway. I wonder if that is just simple mechanics in that as a beamter you could perhaps simply not serve for 50 years under normal circumstances, 16+50=66 and I guess you retired at 65 or am I way wide of the mark? That is if you could be a beamter at 16 years old? I guess on the other hand you could have started work as early as 14 in the private sector and I suppose not retire at 65? I don't know just guessing?

Jock :)

Edited by Jock Auld
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Hello Jock.

Ref.# 13 in Germany by just finishing basic schooling ( Volksschule) at age 14 one could as you state, finish 50 years of a given trade at age 64 or 65. Civil service may have required a step up as a minimum ( Mittelschule) which one would leave at age 16. And I believe mandatory retirement at 65.

Bernhard H. Holst

Edited by Bernhard H.Holst
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