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Medalbar with:

 

1. Iron Cross 2nd class 1914

2. Bremen Hanseatic Cross

3. German Honour Cross of the World War (for front-line veterans)

4. Colombia Centennial Cross of Boyaca (1922-1928)

5. Inofficial Colombian Cross with a inscription on the reverse side: A / HANS WILKENS / CONTADOR DE LA EXPE= / DICION AEREA INTER= / AMERICANA AL INICIARSE / TE SERVICIO DE COLOMBRIA. / SEPTIEMBRE 1925. / EL CONCEJO MUNICIPAL DE B. QUILLA / A. LOMBARDI

 

Is there a Hans Wilkens to be found in the Bremen Hanseatic Cross rolls?

 

Thanks in advance, Komtur.

 

Wilkens, Hans a.jpg

Wilkens, Hans r.jpg

Wilkens, Hans detail.jpg

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A nice bar, I am allways fascinated about the history which stands behind these bars! This makes our hobby so much more fun, at least for me. 

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Hi,

Sampeling the Bremer Addressbook 1914, 1919 und 1929 did not produce results for this name.

Best,

GreyC

 

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With great input of Andreas 👍 the mystery of the last decoration could be solved:

Diario Oficial 23. Oktober 1925 121.JPG

Diario Oficial 23. Oktober 1925 125.JPG

Flugroute Dornier 1925.jpg

Hans Wilkens vor dem Zentralamerikaflug mit den Dornier Wal Flugbooten Atlantico und Pacifico.jpg

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Hi Komtur,

 

it was a pleasure for me.

 

Regards

 

Andreas

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I read about this over at SDA, simply outstanding Schnalle with great history. And don't show this bar to Claudio......

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Posted (edited)

This is a beautiful looking medal bar just bursting with interesting and eye-catching colors.  

Could somebody please clarify why Hans Wilkens received these 2 Columbian medals?  I don't read spanish, although in about 30 years, it will probably be the official language of the United States.  The other article is in English but the letters are so small and faint, I can't possibly even begin to read the words.  Simi.  

Edited by Simius Rex

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2 hours ago, Simius Rex said:

... Could somebody please clarify why Hans Wilkens received these 2 Columbian medals?  ...

Wilkens got the Colombian decoration for his services in connection with transfering two flying boats of the Dornier Do J type (civil version) from Europe to America. The memory cross on the last position of the bar shows the route of the Central America flight of the Dornier ATLANTICO and PACIFICO in August 1925. On the picture with this two flying boats before starting for this flight Wilkens is to be seen as a member of the crew.

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according to the article he was the accountant for the aerial expedition team

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Posted (edited)

Thank you very much for the clarification.    

I notice you begin your thread with the name of the medal bar's owner.  Could you associate the name of Mr. Wilkens with this medal bar because you obtained this bar from his estate, because it came with existing provenance, because his name is engraved on one of the medals, or because you researched the bar based on a combination of the Luebeck Cross and the Columbian Centenial Cross?  This would be extremely interesting information to know.  Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex

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On 17/07/2020 at 20:05, Komtur said:

...

5. Inofficial Colombian Cross with a inscription on the reverse side: A / HANS WILKENS / CONTADOR DE LA EXPE= / DICION AEREA INTER= / AMERICANA AL INICIARSE / TE SERVICIO DE COLOMBRIA. / SEPTIEMBRE 1925. / EL CONCEJO MUNICIPAL DE B. QUILLA / A. LOMBARDI

...

The name is engraved as part of the inscription of the last decoration. This memory cross is fixed so strongly, that it is impossible to take a picture of the reverse side.

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I guess I need glasses because I completely overlooked seeing his name.  When I see Spanish text of any kind, I just simply tune-out.  Wouldn't it be nice if all medal bars had the original owners' names engraved on one of the awards?  

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Komtur,

 

might that be Johannes Wilkens, born Bremen, 17.12.1883

He's got the Bremen Hanseatic 10.12.1915 as Lt in 3.Kp/RIR 75

 

Best,

Daniel

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The first name Johannes would match to Hans, however, the correct date of birth for the wanted Hans Wilkens is 01.07.1897.

Regards,

G.O.

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3 hours ago, aviaticus said:

The first name Johannes would match to Hans, however, the correct date of birth for the wanted Hans Wilkens is 01.07.1897.

Regards,

G.O.

Could you please tell me the source of the birth date? 

Thanks and regards, Komtur 

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Sorry for the typo, but the correct date is 01.03.1897.

G.O.

 

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